View Full Version : Dyspraxia questions-


ana futura
02-25-13, 04:11 PM
I just read up on dyspraxia and it explains things about me that seem beyond ADHD, like my sensory issues and my physical awkwardness/ clumsiness.

It doesn't fit perfectly though- I don't really have any verbal issues, other than difficulty pronouncing certain words- I get tongue tied often.

As far as other inconsistencies, I have problems with gauging distance, but I'm a visual learner and love reading maps.

I have pretty decent balance (although I've done a lot of balance improving activities). Riding a bike came fairly naturally.

The biggest inconsistency is my drawing- I'm a very good drawer, extremely precise. I have a lot of trouble with altering pen pressure though. I often think my drafting skills are not as good as they should be for the amount of time I've spent doing it. My handwriting is crap though, always has been, and it always hurts my hand.

All the other symptoms seem to fit, especially the difficulty telling right from left.

If I do have a mild form of this, it would explain a lot. I'm not sure if it's worth getting diagnosed as an adult though. And my love of riding bikes and my ability to draw make me question it.

I'm really not sure how I'm impaired by it, beyond making messes, or upsetting people when I bump into them/ break their stuff. The sensory issues are really annoying. I'm not even sure how to separate dyspraxia from ADHD obliviousness.

Should I pursue a DX? Is it worth it? Is it even possible that I have it?

Can I get special accommodations for it in college, like not being penalized for typos? I'm always leaving words out and mixing up homonyms.

ana futura
02-25-13, 04:33 PM
And I already did the WAIS and some other tests during my ADHD evaluation- should it have shown up then? I remember there was some sort of drawing test, I think I did it perfectly.

Can a person simply be uncoordinated/ clumsy? What is the difference between ADHD plus clumsy, versus ADHD plus dyspraxia?

Another interesting thing is that my handwriting improves on meds, but my leaving out words when I write does not.

daveddd
02-25-13, 10:38 PM
the dyspraxia is just part of the ADHD

the only reason for a separate dx would be treatment

for motor skills, that would just be therapy

for the sensory issues i have seen a couple small, successful studies involving medication. i believe atypical anti-psychotics

ana futura
02-25-13, 10:58 PM
Thanks Dave, that's what it seems like to me. That's interesting about the sensory treatment.

dresser
02-26-13, 02:32 AM
I t's somthing you can keep an eye on and see if it explins itself further. I thaught my hand-
writing improved at start of meds N when i noticed having to put words in the sentence
that I thaught I had put In I even asked friend if I spoke that waymmm

hopeing the Info will add some peace to you life kiddo knowing you and Dave has put some in mine
I'ts nice to be among'st friends. I'ts 2330 I just woke up been sleeping to much

stay well both of ys Ana N Dave

Idiota
02-26-13, 05:47 PM
I have no sense of literal direction and when put on the spot, I mess up. I hope you are in the UK, because it's just not recognized that much in the US. I can't draw or handwrite properly and this has limited my educational achievement, especially since I couldn't get a real dx any time I went to a doctor. I'm not sure if I just walked a bit better because I was a doctor, but I've been apprehended by law enforcement several times because of how I walk and they perceive me to be high or drunk.

mommytriz
03-04-13, 12:52 AM
I'm not sure as an adult what the benefit of a dx might be if you don't attempt O/T to help compensate. I am almost certain my 8 year old has it alongside her ADHD. Her O/T never mentions her condition by that name so I guess we'd need to see a specialized Dr. for an official dx. She has pretty much every difficulty listed for dyspraxia except the verbal/language ones.

She has been receiving O/T for about 9 months to train her to recognize her R and left, improve her spatial orientation on the planet and improve her fine and gross motor skills. It has been a very long road, but I do see some progress.

I guess if you find out about college accomodations, that may be a benefit of an official dx.

Flory
03-04-13, 01:14 AM
i have a dyspraxia dx, in all honesty :/ not alot they can really do for you except recommend accomodations, i use dragon speak and various other computer softwares, a dictaphone etc...since i ma total bum atm none of this really has any impact on my condition, because of the combination of my conditions its hard to see what is caused by what (ADHD Severe C, Dyspraxia, Irlens, Autistic traits) and in alleviating one sometimes the problem still exists as a result of something else :( the balance is something though that i find i can help by all of the exercises i do, it doesnt however stop me from occasionally kicking the pad holder in the face or groin by accident :p

Flory
03-04-13, 01:16 AM
as far as clumsiness goes im often left wondering whether its as a result of my impulsivity, rushing and general hyperness and not paying due care to my envrionment

ana futura
03-04-13, 01:23 AM
the balance is something though that i find i can help by all of the exercises i do, it doesnt however stop me from occasionally kicking the pad holder in the face or groin by accident :p
:lol: I've done this! I've also punched myself before, don't ask how...

I think my symptoms are very mild. I'm really just a klutz. I suppose it will forever take me 30 seconds to figure out right from left.

as far as clumsiness goes im often left wondering whether its as a result of my impulsivity, rushing and general hyperness and not paying due care to my envrionment

Me too.

Idiota
03-04-13, 02:20 PM
The accomodations are the best part. I couldn't even get a diagnosis for even dysgraphia even though it had been noticeable throughout my childhood and after. Consequently, when I got to the Uni level, I'd mess up mid terms and finals and my thoughts wouldn't be organized because it was taking a lot out of me to write anything. The stress is constant and people just don't give a **** if you don't have a dx. Here I am with no future.

roseblood
03-17-14, 10:00 AM
I'm trying to get evaluated for dyspraxia (called "Developmental Coordination Disorder" in the diagnostic manuals) at the moment. I have been significantly impaired by it occupationally (trying to do "unskilled" manual labour was a complete disaster) and socially (people get frustrated with me, I get in the way and collide/nearly collide with others far too easily which seems rude or careless, and I'm extremely reluctant to dance in front of others, which might not sound significant but it has felt so in this club-loving culture). About half of people with ADHD also have dyspraxia, but research is limited and some think the proportion is even higher. The association is so strong that parts of Scandinavia treat ADHD+dyspraxia as a distinct condition, instead of as a dual diagnosis. Google "Deficits in Attention, Motor Control and Perception" - that's what half of us would be diagnosed with, in Sweden and Denmark.

By adulthood, as you have found yourself, the brain has often caught up to normal development so it's not clinically impairing anymore, just as ADHD isn't for some lucky people. It's more common to grow out of dyspraxia than to grow out of ADHD.

For diagnosis, you don't have to have problems across the board with motor skills, i.e. both gross motor and fine motor, or both planning/ideation and execution; almost nobody is impaired across the board. Certainly "verbal dyspraxia" isn't necessary for diagnosis: it's not even supposed to be diagnosed as dyspraxia/DCD, but as Phonological Disorder. You just have to be clinically impaired by a deficit in some or other aspect of the complex process of performing motor tasks.

For example, one of my biggest problems is that it takes a long time to automatise a task. I have to think consciously about what I'm doing, dramatically slowing me down, long after everyone else is able to do it absentmindedly while multitasking. That's a common reason to be diagnosed with dyspraxia. I also have significant problems understanding how to manipulate the environment in ways other people find simple, a kind of ideational dyspraxia. It took me far too long as a child, for example, to learn how to fold towels or clothing, and how to use the tags that hooked our sheets of paper into our folders at school. Even the mentally retarded children could do this before I could. Someone can show me how to do something, like tie a knot in something so that it won't come undone, and I just can't make sense of what I'm seeing them do. I can't follow an aerobics class because I can't relate what I'm seeing someone else do, to my own body very well. Left and right confusion contributes significantly.

The very bizarre thing is that I actually score above average on standardised tests of visual-spatial reasoning, including the non-verbal part IQ tests I took as part of the ADHD evaluation. My ideational dyspraxic symptoms would suggest I have extremely poor visual-spatial reasoning, but obviously whatever deficit I do have in that regard, is too narrow or irrelevant to those tests to be detected by them. The tests you take for dyspraxia cover a broader range of visual-spatial skills, both integrated and in isolation, and use direct motor skill testing as well, so I hope that they will identify exactly what skill I have a deficit in.

Flory
03-17-14, 03:00 PM
Whilst I can understand wanting a dx for clarification rose there's honestly not much point in it as there are now services available at all to treat it especially not in our region of kent

Flory
03-17-14, 03:00 PM
*no services

Flory
03-17-14, 03:04 PM
I was referred to an OT at 15 and got turned away because I was too old for the services :(

Hyperman87
03-17-14, 03:12 PM
as far as clumsiness goes im often left wondering whether its as a result of my impulsivity, rushing and general hyperness and not paying due care to my envrionment


:goodpost:

Hey, Flory :) I'm clumsy too,very clumsy! :lol: Well, at first it was due to Developmental Coordination disorder(Developmental Dyspraxia) & it still does play a huge part in my movement difficulties @ 26. :o ADHD never really seems to effect my balance or movement to any degree that I'm aware of, that is!:lol:

Now though, the big concerns with my movement symptoms center on or surround Parkinson disease! Both Developmental Dyspraxia & Parkinson disease can make a man or woman/boy or girl, appear drunk, tipsy, or just plain careless. :(

ADHD & Developmental Coordination Disorder classically co-occur here in the states. If you have ADHD symptoms & a history of clumsiness,the good news is your ADHD dx is certainly correct! :lol::o The bad news is you also have Dyspraxia. There really is no effective remedy for the disorder either.

It's now usually considered a life-long disorder of the nervous system along with many cases of Attention Deficit Disorder. :mad:

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001533.htm


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_coordination_disorder

Hyperman87
03-17-14, 03:25 PM
I just read up on dyspraxia and it explains things about me that seem beyond ADHD, like my sensory issues and my physical awkwardness/ clumsiness.

It doesn't fit perfectly though- I don't really have any verbal issues, other than difficulty pronouncing certain words- I get tongue tied often.

As far as other inconsistencies, I have problems with gauging distance, but I'm a visual learner and love reading maps.

I have pretty decent balance (although I've done a lot of balance improving activities). Riding a bike came fairly naturally.

The biggest inconsistency is my drawing- I'm a very good drawer, extremely precise. I have a lot of trouble with altering pen pressure though. I often think my drafting skills are not as good as they should be for the amount of time I've spent doing it. My handwriting is crap though, always has been, and it always hurts my hand.

All the other symptoms seem to fit, especially the difficulty telling right from left.

If I do have a mild form of this, it would explain a lot. I'm not sure if it's worth getting diagnosed as an adult though. And my love of riding bikes and my ability to draw make me question it.

I'm really not sure how I'm impaired by it, beyond making messes, or upsetting people when I bump into them/ break their stuff. The sensory issues are really annoying. I'm not even sure how to separate dyspraxia from ADHD obliviousness.

Should I pursue a DX? Is it worth it? Is it even possible that I have it?

Can I get special accommodations for it in college, like not being penalized for typos? I'm always leaving words out and mixing up homonyms.

:goodpost:

Yes Ana(excellent question btw) :) You should get a dx(even if you feel you are much too old for or have outgrown many of developmental dyspraxia's impairments now as a dx.) It will help you to understand certain sensori-motor issues you have now & mostly always had. Plus dx of Developmental Coordination Disorder virtually guarantees that your prior ADHD dx was no mistake or was about 100 accurate. :yes: