View Full Version : GeneSightRX?


ysabeau
02-28-13, 07:44 PM
Really couldn't work out which was the most appropriate spot to post this, so please feel free to shift elsewhere if need be.

Have been looking into whether there is a general sort of scale or something of that sort, to rank stimulating ssri's and trying to somehow find either anecdotal or research based feedback about who does better on which drug. Have been changing drug regime around to try and make it more effective and fell into a gigantic black hole so to speak. What I thought would be more stimulating infact was almost like going into some suburban version of cryostasis.

Thats when I wandered across an advertisement (post name is product name also). My understanding is it tests a patient for certain genes that allow some degree of predictability in prescribing, focus on psychotropics/ADHD/analgesics.
So I guess covering a lot of controlled substances.

I find it a bit odd because gene mapping and testing is still fully establishing itself in practical hands-on clinical settings I had thought.

And the lunatic fringe element of my personality wonders if its not just about profit motive or even the beginning of medical insurers having access to increased genetic information about its customers/clients/whatever, by default.
I mean who wouldn't want to cut to the chase and get the right drug for themselves first try?

Anyone tried it, read about it, or have any knowledge that would be instructive at all?

The name of the test is the title of this post.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 07:14 PM
Interesting.

I read a little bit about this information.

If I understand correctly, the doctors can do all these tests for a patient anyway.

If I understand correctly, it helps to determine the way the medication is absorbed by the body.

Helps determine if a person should take higher or lower dosages of certain medications that are absorbed through the P 450 enzyme system?

It might help improve the trial and error ways of determining which amounts and when to take certain medication.

But if the doctor can request these tests in a lab, why not do it that way.

This is the first time I considered the topic.

And don't claim to know for sure.

But it was a challenge to understand the new material.

I am only posting this information for discussion purposes,

and don't know for sure.

Thanks

Amtram
03-07-13, 08:29 PM
It is way too early for this to work. A company like that is looking for individual SNPs that are most common for certain risk factors, because that's pretty much all we know so far. A complete genome profile for an individual can run as much as $10,000. If they're charging a lot less than that, well, you get the idea. . .

mildadhd
03-07-13, 09:50 PM
It is way too early for this to work. A company like that is looking for individual SNPs that are most common for certain risk factors, because that's pretty much all we know so far. A complete genome profile for an individual can run as much as $10,000. If they're charging a lot less than that, well, you get the idea. . .

Yes this is the only time I ever heard of the concept.

The P450 enzyme system is interesting.

It would be interesting to learn more about how our stomachs, (or gut?) (or intestines?) what is the differences?

Absorb our medication ,

and how does the medication go from our mouth, to our stomach, to the organs, to get to our brains? (I think)(what order does blood and hormones belong?)

Never really thought about it before?

Where does the medication go when I swallow it?



I don't know what a genome profile is?

I wonder if a persons genome profile changes through out life?

,

mildadhd
03-07-13, 10:09 PM
A complete genome profile for an individual can run as much as $10,000. If they're charging a lot less than that, well, you get the idea. . .-Amtram

I don't really understand the cost of health care, like where you live. I imagine we would have to pay to

Just guessing but I have never discussed anything like this test with my doctor.

Probably because of the monetary issues you describe above.

Trial and error would be cheaper.




Stresses me just thinking about it.

Amtram
03-08-13, 12:32 PM
Gene sequencing isn't medical treatment yet. A genome profile is the complete detail of your DNA, and your DNA does not ever change in your lifetime.

Gene-specific medications will be a thing as time goes on, but the human genome is so complex that it's going to take a long time. Most recently, I had read that scientists had found a gene that determined resistance to morphine, and that made me happy because I know that morphine and codeine are like sugar pills for me. It's kind of a "see, I told you it wasn't working!" moment.

I think the way it will probably go is that response to individual chemicals or chemical compounds will be tested in lab animals, one at a time, until they can narrow down the likely genes. It's not going to start with the genes, but the medicines.

mildadhd
03-08-13, 04:40 PM
From what I understand, Affective Neuroscience is working on molecules,

inolved in the primary emotional systems that are safe opioids.

And also other molecules that involve the primary emotional systems.

I think that is where the future medicine might also found..


I find it hard to understand the genome stuff.

If all people have the same genes in the genome. (read only 22 000?)

why don't we have the same genome?

What makes one persons genome different than another person's geneome?

.

Lunacie
03-08-13, 05:01 PM
I agree that's it's much to early for a test like this to be really helpful, but
I don't have any spare cash to give it a trial anyway.

I thought I'd heard that DNA does change in very small ways over a lifetime.
http://www.wisegeek.org/can-your-dna-change-during-your-life.htm#slideshow

Amtram
03-08-13, 05:12 PM
Gene expression changes during our lifetime. That article needs to be tweaked a bit, IMO. It mentions how epigenetics is "interesting," but the DNA changes it discusses are epigenetic changes, not actually changes in DNA.

Peripheral, the key in genetic variety is how many different ways the proteins in DNA can be mixed up and put back in order. The genome is like a filing system, and it comes with more folders than you can possibly fit into it. Even though everyone may get the same number of folders and the same amount of space in the filing system, everyone will put it together a little differently and have a different set of folders that don't get used.

mildadhd
03-09-13, 04:06 PM
Gene expression changes during our lifetime. That article needs to be tweaked a bit, IMO. It mentions how epigenetics is "interesting," but the DNA changes it discusses are epigenetic changes, not actually changes in DNA.

Peripheral, the key in genetic variety is how many different ways the proteins in DNA can be mixed up and put back in order. The genome is like a filing system, and it comes with more folders than you can possibly fit into it. Even though everyone may get the same number of folders and the same amount of space in the filing system, everyone will put it together a little differently and have a different set of folders that don't get used.

How do we know the difference between epigenetic related gene expressions and non epigenetic related gene expressions?

Some seem more newer adaptive related and some more ancient instinct related?

I am guessing the environmental influence might be stronger in the newer adaptive gene expressions,

and less in the ancient instinct related gene expressions?

But I still cannot count out some environmental influence in both?

Amtram
03-09-13, 05:53 PM
Epigenetics is gene expression. Epigenetics is the process by which instructions from the DNA are directed by RNA to make proteins produce all the cells of the body. Whether it's a heritable trait, a random mutation, or a chemical that alters myelation of the histones that make the proteins go to work, it's all part of the epigenetic process.

Environmental influence in the epigenetic process usually means that whatever part of the body that was being "planned" at the time of exposure is going to be altered, and not for the better. Environmental influence on the epigenetic process is going to take the form of a chemical that interrupts the myelation of histones, and therefore the original plan for development.

If this happens during fetal development, you end up with deformities or functional abnormalities. If this happens later in life, you end up with degeneration or age-related diseases because the replacement cells being created through this process are defective copies of the cells they're replacing.

mildadhd
03-09-13, 06:16 PM
Epigenetics is gene expression. Epigenetics is the process by which instructions from the DNA are directed by RNA to make proteins produce all the cells of the body. Whether it's a heritable trait, a random mutation, or a chemical that alters myelation of the histones that make the proteins go to work, it's all part of the epigenetic process.

Environmental influence in the epigenetic process usually means that whatever part of the body that was being "planned" at the time of exposure is going to be altered, and not for the better. Environmental influence on the epigenetic process is going to take the form of a chemical that interrupts the myelation of histones, and therefore the original plan for development.

If this happens during fetal development, you end up with deformities or functional abnormalities. If this happens later in life, you end up with degeneration or age-related diseases because the replacement cells being created through this process are defective copies of the cells they're replacing.

If every gene expression is epigenetic, then is there environment factors required in every gene expression?

Sounds like environment is a decisive factor in gene expression?

I don't believe environmental influences are always "not for the better".

Doesn't sound like anything is totally decided or "planned" til the environmental exposure occurs?

It seems like some gene expressions are more environmentally influenced (adaptive), some more hard wired (Instinct), but they all have environmental influences?

Sounds like both good and bad environmental influences seem very important in gene expression?

I read that gene expression and protein synthesis occurs in learning, how can learning be bad?

I read that gene expression is involved in smelling, how can smelling be bad?

I read that gene expression is involved in eyesight, how can eyesight be bad?

How can I learn or smell without environmental factors?

Environment is as important as the genes.

In my opinion your underestimating the environmental influence in gene expression,

especially with higher adaptive brain involved in ADD.

.

Amtram
03-09-13, 09:03 PM
Gene expression is how the instructions from DNA are expressed in the form of a living creature. In fetal development, this is the combined DNA from sperm and egg being expressed as organs and limbs and bones. . .it happens as a process all the time, with the only necessary environmental exposure being a womb with a good lining.

mildadhd
03-09-13, 10:23 PM
Transgenerational effects of posttraumatic stress disorder in babies of mothers exposed to the World Trade Center attacks during pregnancy.





Abstract

CONTEXT:

Reduced cortisol levels have been linked with vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the risk factor of parental PTSD in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to report on the relationship between maternal PTSD symptoms and salivary cortisol levels in infants of mothers directly exposed to the World Trade Center collapse on September 11, 2001 during pregnancy.

DESIGN:

Mothers (n = 38) collected salivary cortisol samples from themselves and their 1-yr-old babies at awakening and at bedtime.

RESULTS:

Lower cortisol levels were observed in both mothers (F = 5.15, df = 1, 34; P = 0.030) and babies of mothers (F = 8.0, df = 1, 29; P = 0.008) who developed PTSD in response to September 11 compared with mothers who did not develop PTSD and their babies. Lower cortisol levels were most apparent in babies born to mothers with PTSD exposed in their third trimesters.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data suggest that effects of maternal PTSD related to cortisol can be observed very early in the life of the offspring and underscore the relevance of in utero contributors to putative biological risk for PTSD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15870120