View Full Version : Are allergies genetic?


mildadhd
03-05-13, 10:40 PM
i!i




Are allergy sensitivities genetic?

I think they could be.


Does that mean there is no environmental factors in allergies?





i!i

sarahsweets
03-06-13, 05:44 AM
There's no "maybe" option peripheral;)

fracturedstory
03-06-13, 07:28 AM
I got a Vitamin C allergy from something. I wasn't born with it. I think it was the Pill.

I started noticing a weird skin condition around my 20s too. It's called photodermatitis. I've always just had eczema.

Most of the other stuff could be genetic but I've definitely got some recent food allergies. Or perhaps my intolerance has increased as my sensory sensitivity has increased.

Lunacie
03-06-13, 10:12 AM
Yes, allergies have a genetic link. But if you were never exposed to the
thing, you wouldn't ever know it. Sometimes all it takes is one exposure.
More often it takes several exposures, with the allergy getting worse each
time.

Everything in our lives is interconnected. No one here has made any claims
that ADHD or anything else is solely caused by inherited genetics. This is
getting soooooo old.

I don't care which came first - the chicken or the egg - I'm grateful for any
and all research that leads to better diagnostics, better treatments and,
maybe for my great-grandkids, prevention. Of allergies and mental health
disorders.

KellySG
03-06-13, 12:50 PM
My husband and I have no allergies but our 3rd child has MANY. She was born early. Its the only reason I can think of as to why she has them. None of my other kids have any.

Conman
03-06-13, 01:01 PM
like many things, im pretty sure allergies can have genetic ties or be completely genetic in some cases, but there also plenty of people in the world who seemingly have no genetic basis for allergies at all.

when i was 5 or 6 i got the allergy skin test thing, i tested all 26 out of 26. go figure. practically allergic to anything.

today, im only allergic to cats/dogs if im in a place with a high concentration of them (like a house that has 5 cats and 2 dogs for example). if its one cat or one dog, no problem just so long as i dont rub my eyes before washing hands at some point (i usually use my non-petting hand).

however what doesnt make sense is im allergic to my grandma's shih tzu (****zu) since she got it and it's apparently a Hypoallergenic dog, and im allergic to it. whatever, i hate 99% of toydogs anyway.

pollen is a nightmare for me. springtime is my hell when it starts. im mostly allergic to plants now, although go figure, i have no clue which ones specifically.

there are a few people in my family who have much more severe allergies to animals than me, but allergies are not widespread. my dad's allergic to penicillin and me and bro are fine, only like 3 people total (out of 25) on my moms side actually have allergies

mildadhd
03-06-13, 02:31 PM
like many things, im pretty sure allergies can have genetic ties or be completely genetic in some cases, but there also plenty of people in the world who seemingly have no genetic basis for allergies at all.

when i was 5 or 6 i got the allergy skin test thing, i tested all 26 out of 26. go figure. practically allergic to anything.

today, im only allergic to cats/dogs if im in a place with a high concentration of them (like a house that has 5 cats and 2 dogs for example). if its one cat or one dog, no problem just so long as i dont rub my eyes before washing hands at some point (i usually use my non-petting hand).

however what doesnt make sense is im allergic to my grandma's shih tzu (****zu) since she got it and it's apparently a Hypoallergenic dog, and im allergic to it. whatever, i hate 99% of toydogs anyway.

pollen is a nightmare for me. springtime is my hell when it starts. im mostly allergic to plants now, although go figure, i have no clue which ones specifically.

there are a few people in my family who have much more severe allergies to animals than me, but allergies are not widespread. my dad's allergic to penicillin and me and bro are fine, only like 3 people total (out of 25) on my moms side actually have allergies


Wow, I am so curious to know why?

I am kind of the opposite, (when it comes to those tests, because I am mildly allergic to things that don't show up as allergic.)

:scratch:


But dust mites swelled big time,

cats less.

One Doctor said something about missing an enzyme, but for some reason I never looked up what that means, not sure why I don't want to?

:scratch:

Enzymes Supplements made me feel better,

but not the entire sensitivity.

.

Lunacie
03-06-13, 03:04 PM
If you're missing the right enzymes to digest milk, you're not actually
allergic to milk.

I've never been completely sure what the difference is between an allergy
and a sensitivity. I'm very sensitive to sand flea bites, but they don't cause
anaphylaxis, just unbearable itching.

I have seasonal allergies, that's what they're called. The only medication
that has ever helped me is Zyrtec. And I've tried a lot, prescription and OTC.

I've only had an anaphylactic reaction once, to a medication to treat high
blood pressure.

Lunacie
03-06-13, 03:18 PM
This study about whether allergies are genetic shows results that are very
similar to the studies that ask whether genetics are responsible for ADHD.
http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f03/web3/m1teicher.html

mildadhd
03-06-13, 04:06 PM
This study about whether allergies are genetic shows results that are very
similar to the studies that ask whether genetics are responsible for ADHD.
http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f03/web3/m1teicher.html

Both, Allergies and ADD are the result of a relationship,

between the genes and the environment.

I'm not trying to be a buttox.


It is just the way it is.


Not environment

Not genetic

Environment and Genetic

Consider the relationship for prevention, severity, and treatment.


An allergy needs to be allergic to something in the environment for the hyperreaction to occur.

Gene Expression related to ADD, also requires an environment for the expression occur.

Until til someone proves otherwise.

(There is no brain damage in ADD.)

There is critical time of development before the age of 7 to 10.

Critical Periods of development.

The most critical period involving development of implicit/self regulation. (more specifically right hemisphere, right Orbito Frontal Cortex) is birth, to the age of 3

Genetic Sensitivity before birth probably occurs in the middle and lower (emotional) brain.

Affecting the development of the higher brain (self regulation brain)


.

Abi
03-06-13, 09:26 PM
Moderator Note

The discussion about the roles of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of ADHD has been moved to a more appropriate section of the forum, the Theoretical & Philosophical Discussions section. That thread may be found by clicking here (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=141514)

Please note that the Co-Existing conditions section is for people to discuss conditions that they have other than ADHD, either for their own sake; or with respect to their ADHD.

In the case of this thread, the majority of the discussion focused on the aetiology of ADHD, with no reference to the co-existing condition (in this case allergies) after the first handful of posts.

Please keep posts on this thread confined to Allergies or (Allergies + ADHD) in future.

Thank you :)

mildadhd
03-06-13, 10:21 PM
Are allergy sensitivities genetic?

I think they could be.


Does that mean there is no environmental factors in allergies?

mildadhd
03-06-13, 11:10 PM
Quote:
The derivation of sensitivity is from the Latin word sensir, "to feel".

Degrees of sensitivity reflect degrees of feeling.

Of the various Oxford Dictionary definitions of sensitive,

it will be useful to keep three in mind.

Each is exquisitely apt as a description of the ADD child:


1. Very open to or acutely affected by external stimuli or mental impressions.

2. Easlily offended, or emotionally hurt.

3. (As of an instrument) responsive to or recording small changes.


The word has another connotation,

that of being empathetic,

respectful of other people's feelings.

The two meanings may coexist in the same individual,

but not in every case.

Some of the most sensitive people in terms of how they react may be the least mindful of the feelings of others.

Quote:
Some human beings are hyperreactive.

A relatively negligible stimulus,

or what to other people would seem negligilble,

set off in them an intense reaction.

When this happens in response to physical stimuli,

we say the person is allergic.

Someone allergic to, say, bee venom may choke,

wheeze and gasp for air when stung.

The small airways in the lungs may go into spasm,

tissues in the throat may swell,

the heartbeat may become irregular.

His life may be in peril.

The nonallergic person,

had she been stung by the same bee,

would experience no more than a momentary pain,

a welt, an irritating itch.

Was it the bee sting that sent the first victim into physiological crisis?

Not directly.

It was his own physiological responses that brought him close to death.

More accurately, it was the combination of stimulus and reaction.

The precise medical term for an allergy, for this hyperreactivity,

is hypersensitivity.

Quote:
People with ADD are hypersensitive.

That is not a fault or a weakness of theirs, it is how they were born.

It is their inborn temperament.

That, primarily, is what is hereditary about ADD.

Genetic inheritance by itself cannot account for the presence of ADD features in people,

but heredity can make it far more likely that these features will emerge in a given individual,

depending on circumstances.

It is sensitivity, not disorder, that is transmitted through heredity.

In most cases, ADD is caused by the impact of the environment on particularly sensitive infants.

Quote:
Sensitive is the reason why allergies are more common among ADD children than in the rest of the population.

It is well known, and borne out again and again in clinical practice,

that children with ADD are more likely than their non-ADD counterparts to have a history of frequent colds,

upper respiratory infections, ear infections, asthma, eczema and allergies,

a fact interpreted by some as evidence that ADD is due to allergies.

Although the flare-up of allergies can certainly aggravate ADD symptoms,

the one does not cause the other.

They both are expressions of the same underlying inborn trait: sensitivity.

Since emotionally hypersensitive reactions are no less physiological than the body's allergic responses to physical substances,

we may say truthfully that people with ADD have emotional allergies.


Quote:
Almost any parent with an ADD child,

or any adult living with an ADD spouse,

will have noticed in the ADD person a touchiness, a "thin skin".

People with ADD are forever told that they are "too sensitive" or that they should stop being "so touchy."

One might as well advise a child with hay fever to stop being "so allergic"

All quotes from:

-Gabor Mate M.D., Scattered, (Emotional Allergies), p 58-59.

Drewbacca
03-07-13, 01:57 AM
If you're missing the right enzymes to digest milk, you're not actually
allergic to milk.

I've never been completely sure what the difference is between an allergy
and a sensitivity. I'm very sensitive to sand flea bites, but they don't cause
anaphylaxis, just unbearable itching.

Humans as mammals aren't really supposed to be able to digest milk beyond infancy, we are unique in regards to this. Not everyone has the mutant gene required to (continue to) produce the enzyme into adulthood.

The substrate is called lactose, it is a form of sugar.
The enzyme is called lactase (common naming conventions -ose, -ase).
So, the lack of the enzyme (caused by the lack of a gene which produces the enzyme) is an intolerance. In this case, lactose-intolerance. If your body doesn't produce lactase, you will be unable to break down the lactose into its lesser chemical components. In this specific case, lactose-intolerance is a known genetic issue. Fortunately, you can take a lactase with your meal if you lack the enzyme with the OTC "lactaid."

As for allergy vs sensitivity:
Sensitivity is anything causing an abnormal reaction.
Allergy implies the release of histamine and can be treated with anti-histamines which prevent the body from releasing histamines (i.e. you don't swell up, itch, etc.).

If you want to get really technical, there are different types of anti-bodies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibody); only one type is responsible for histamine release (IgE). Other antibodies are believed to be responsible for sensitivity (IgG) but there is no scientific consensus on this (or the tests that determine sensitivity... results have been, as they say "not statistically significant").

It's also important to be aware that sometimes intolerance and sensitivity are used interchangeably (and I believe, incorrectly).

[edit] I should also clarify that we all release histamine, an allergy is the excessive release of histamine... the level of histamine released is dependent on genetic predisposition. As with so many things on these boards, the histamine-response is on a spectrum. What constitutes an "allergic reaction" is an arbitrary scale which the medical community came up with as a form of measurement. Anyone who has ever had a skin-prick allergy test is familiar with this, when the doctor pulls out a ruler to measure the size of the swelling. So, it's not really an issue of whether you HAVE or DON'T HAVE an allergic reaction... we all have the reaction, the question is how intense the reaction is (i.e. how much histamine does your body release in response to a bee-sting, pollen, or mites).

Emotional sensitivity, as it pertains to ADHD is a different thing entirely and has nothing to do with what I've written above. This is a case where "sensitivity" is a really vague word that can be used in different ways.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 11:39 AM
Sorry if I was not clear in poll question in this thread.

In the poll question I should have asked,

Are ADD related allergies hereditary?


Below is what I wanted to ask in the OP.

Sorry for not being more clear,

my error was not intentional.


Are ADD allergy sensitivities hereditary?

I think they could be.

Are there environmental factors in ADD related Allergies?

Drewbacca
03-07-13, 03:17 PM
@Peripheral,

It's very common to say one thing and mean another. No one ever said that dialogue/communication was an easy thing. If it was, the divorce rate wouldn't be so high.

That said, if you would have worded the title "Are ADD related allergies hereditary," this thread would have been moved to the science forum right from the get go. This particular forum is a place to talk about allergies, as they occur along side ADHD. To my knowledge, there is no such thing as an "ADD allergy." If there was, then it would be part of the diagnostic criteria. However, the two are completely independent of one another.

The sensitivity related to ADHD is a completely different thing, as it has nothing to do with anti-bodies. I think what you really meant to say was: "are ADD related sensitivities hereditary?"

I am sorry for the confusion, and for any frustration that it may have caused. Perhaps we can change the focus of this thread to: what is the difference between an allergy and sensitivity?

Is psychological sensitivity related to physical sensitivity? Would be another good topic, although that one belongs in the science forum.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 03:32 PM
@Peripheral,

It's very common to say one thing and mean another. No one ever said that dialogue/communication was an easy thing. If it was, the divorce rate wouldn't be so high.

That said, if you would have worded the title "Are ADD related allergies hereditary," this thread would have been moved to the science forum right from the get go. This particular forum is a place to talk about allergies, as they occur along side ADHD. To my knowledge, there is no such thing as an "ADD allergy." If there was, then it would be part of the diagnostic criteria. However, the two are completely independent of one another.

The sensitivity related to ADHD is a completely different thing, as it has nothing to do with anti-bodies. I think what you really meant to say was: "are ADD related sensitivities hereditary?"

I am sorry for the confusion, and for any frustration that it may have caused. Perhaps we can change the focus of this thread to: what is the difference between an allergy and sensitivity?

Is psychological sensitivity related to physical sensitivity? Would be another good topic, although that one belongs in the science forum.

I appreciate your opinion,

I don't refere to the DSM because it doesn't consider emotions.

Which boggles my mind because it is for emotional health issues? (but maybe that is a different subject.)

Doesn't give me much confidence in it.

I have no problem with you or anyone else having your own opinion.

In my opinion people with ADD are born more sensitive to the environment.

Both physically and emotionally.

Nothing is established til a relationship is made with the environment.

Both physically and emotionally. (internally and externally)

Genes (hereditary)do matter, but can't work by themselves.

They need an environment.

Just like hereditary influence in ADD, also needs an environment.

There is no doubt in my mind that ADD and allergies are strongly influenced by the environment in many ways.

.

Abi
03-07-13, 03:45 PM
I don't refere to the DSM because it doesn't consider emotions.

The DSM refers to emotions all the time. In the sections pertaining to primarily emotional disorders, such as Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and Genearalised Anxiety Disorder.

The DSM does not consider emotions in the diagnosis of ADHD because ADHD is not a primarily an emotional disorder, but rather a disorder of cognition, impulse control and executive functioning.

Many ADHD sufferers have an emotional disorder co-occuring beside their ADHD. I believe anxiety spectrum disorders are the most common. However, these disorders are seperate conditions forom ADHD. Each is diagnosed individually based on the criteria for that condition.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 03:57 PM
Perhaps we can change the focus of this thread to: what is the difference between an allergy and sensitivity?



I have no problem discussing this angle in this thread,

it would be part, allready.

Everything must be considered. (That is what science is to me)

I never posted this thread in this section, it was a general section question.

What ever the moderators think is best.

( I assumed that people would assume that I was including ADD but I will be more clear in the future)

My mistake.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 04:00 PM
The DSM refers to emotions all the time. In the sections pertaining to primarily emotional disorders, such as Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and Genearalised Anxiety Disorder.

The DSM does not consider emotions in the diagnosis of ADHD because ADHD is not a primarily an emotional disorder, but rather a disorder of cognition, impulse control and executive functioning.

Many ADHD sufferers have an emotional disorder co-occuring beside their ADHD. I believe anxiety spectrum disorders are the most common. However, these disorders are seperate conditions forom ADHD. Each is diagnosed individually based on the criteria for that condition.

Are you speaking as a moderator or a member?

Just making sure before I reply.

Abi
03-07-13, 04:13 PM
See my signature

mildadhd
03-07-13, 04:22 PM
See my signature

I don't mind disagreeing.



EI/DESR HAS BEEN INCLUDED IN
CONCEPTS OF ADHD FOR 170 YEARS


 1798 – Alexander Crichton includes emotional frustration as part of
disorders of attention persistence in first medical paper on attention
disorders
 1902 – George Still includes emotional impulsiveness and poor regulation
of emotions by “moral control” in his conceptualizations of defective
moral control of behavior (historical precursor to ADHD)
 1960s – Clinical researchers repeatedly included symptoms of DESR in
their concepts of MBD and the hyperactive child syndrome
 1970 – Mark Stewart includes low frustration tolerance, quickness to
anger, and emotional excitability in his description of the hyperactive
child syndrome
 1975 – Dennis Cantwell includes poor emotion regulation as a core
feature of the hyperactive child syndrome
 1976 – Paul Wender makes poor emotional control a key feature of his
work on MBD in children and adults
 1968 –DSM-II fails to note DESR as a feature of ADHD and it stays out
of DSMs since that time

http://www.caddac.ca/cms/CADDAC_pdf/EmotioninADHD_Barkley.pdf

mildadhd
03-07-13, 04:27 PM
The DSM refers to emotions all the time. In the sections pertaining to primarily emotional disorders, such as Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and Genearalised Anxiety Disorder.

The DSM does not consider emotions in the diagnosis of ADHD because ADHD is not a primarily an emotional disorder, but rather a disorder of cognition, impulse control and executive functioning.

Many ADHD sufferers have an emotional disorder co-occuring beside their ADHD. I believe anxiety spectrum disorders are the most common. However, these disorders are seperate conditions forom ADHD. Each is diagnosed individually based on the criteria for that condition.


From a developmental view.

To me ADD is primarily a emotional condition.

Since we are not discussing ADD and Allergies.

I will start a new thread to explain, my position.

I have been planning on posting a thread on the topic anyway.

.

Abi
03-07-13, 04:37 PM
I can't seem to connect to the site with the PDF link.

Clearly they were observing that a good proportion of ADHD sufferers [67-80%] have comorbid conditions, of which a significant proportion are emotional conditions [anxiety, depression, bipolar...]

This is unsurprising as ADHD likely shares common genes with MDD and BP, as noted in a recent thread.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 04:45 PM
I can't seem to connect to the site with the PDF link.

Clearly they were observing that a good proportion of ADHD sufferers [67-80%] have comorbid conditions, of which a significant proportion are emotional conditions [anxiety, depression, bipolar...]

This is unsurprising as ADHD likely shares common genes with MDD and BP, as noted in a recent thread.


Not sure why, the link works for me?

I will try to have a new thread together today.

in summary the executive is shaped by the emotion.

And not the other way around.

I am sure I will get some opposition, that is OK.

Since we are way off topic, I will try and get a new thread posted soon.

Thanks for asking the question.

Drewbacca
03-07-13, 04:47 PM
I'm just going to make one statement, so as to not drive this thread in a different direction:

The DSM is not the end-all-be-all and shouldn't be judged as such. As it stands, the emotional dysregulation issue isn't included b/c there isn't sufficient evidence to include it. That could change as more research confirms a need for it to be included.

There's a reason why the DSM is about to be released in at 5th edition... our knowledge of mental disorders and the consensus surrounding them is always changing; that's a good thing! If they jumped the gun and included every possible change before testing has proven a link, we'd be on like the 400th edition by now. Progress is slow, and if you are correct in your assumption, I guarantee that it will eventually be included. No reason to disregard the book.

When I speak of ADHD, I am referring to ADHD as defined by the current version of the DSM. Following the consensus is not an opinion, it's finding agreement on how to define terms for the sake of argument. Without some level of consensus, you can't have a discussion. When you speak of some different form of "ADHD" which isn't based on the DSM consensus then it needs to be recognized that we aren't talking about the same thing. The only place on this website for discussing non-DSM-ADHD is the theoretical section of the science forum.

Drewbacca
03-07-13, 04:48 PM
@Abi, the link works for me. *shrugs*

mildadhd
03-07-13, 05:03 PM
I'm just going to make one statement, so as to not drive this thread in a different direction:

The DSM is not the end-all-be-all and shouldn't be judged as such. As it stands, the emotional dysregulation issue isn't included b/c there isn't sufficient evidence to include it. That could change as more research confirms a need for it to be included.

There's a reason why the DSM is about to be released in at 5th edition... our knowledge of mental disorders and the consensus surrounding them is always changing; that's a good thing! If they jumped the gun and included every possible change before testing has proven a link, we'd be on like the 400th edition by now. Progress is slow, and if you are correct in your assumption, I guarantee that it will eventually be included. No reason to disregard the book.

When I speak of ADHD, I am referring to ADHD as defined by the current version of the DSM. Following the consensus is not an opinion, it's finding agreement on how to define terms for the sake of argument. Without some level of consensus, you can't have a discussion. When you speak of some different form of "ADHD" which isn't based on the DSM consensus then it needs to be recognized that we aren't talking about the same thing. The only place on this website for discussing non-DSM-ADHD is the theoretical section of the science forum.


I have been discussing this topic for years.

Sounds like a contradiction to say..

The DSM is not the end-all-be-all and shouldn't be judged as such.


then say...

The only place on this website for discussing non-DSM-ADHD is the theoretical section of the science forum.

to me.

But I am not going to argue.

And don't mind having the discussion in the science section.

What I would prefer is if someone disagree's that they give evidence to why they disagree.

Instead of a majority verse minority.

With no logic.

The majority isn't always right.

I will post in the science section because I am not trying to be an ***.

Just really confused, when people say they disagree but can't say why.

Hope everyone particitpates.

mildadhd
03-07-13, 05:14 PM
side note: I don't disregard the book,

as much as I don't feel comfortable using it.

I try to understand any material with an open mind. But if it is missing information from the beginning, I don't refer.

I wouldn't believe Einstein unless I truly considered the whole picture as best I can.

Right or Wrong,

I also don't disagree to be different.

I try to make sure all angles are covered.

And actually appreciate when someone shows me I'm wrong,

with evidence.

Abi
03-07-13, 05:14 PM
Moderator Note

This thread has a habit of running away from us. Let's keep things on topic.

Peripheral: You said you wanted to make another thread. Let me know when you have done so, and which posts from here you want moved or copied there.

I'm sure Drew ill help with that.

===================

Also, everyone, please be courteous to your fellow members. Please? :)