View Full Version : Not just liking sugar... NEEDING sugar?


silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 02:28 PM
So, I'm currently not on any ADHD meds... just the other stuff in my signature. I remember before that Zoloft severely sedated me, which at the time was why I began taking a Ritalin booster when I was on Concerta... it helped the sedating effect... but now since I'm on nothing....

The only thing is sugar is the ONLY thing that helps keep me awake. Literally. I mean, I love sugar, always have, but now it's a matter of being a zombie-narcoleptic vs being awake and functioning. I slept for 4 hours yesterday after work and was only feeling mildly tired at the time... today I have to work a double, so rather than a nap, I ate ice cream... and I feel much more awake already.

Like I said, I like sugar, but this goes way beyond that.

Any ideas what this may signify? Other than just enjoying sugar?

ana futura
03-06-13, 02:30 PM
Focus on complex carbs instead of simple carbs. Complex carbs like brown rice have sugar too, but they are a slower burning fuel. You are trapped in a simple carb cycle- simple carbs = energy now, crash later.

First you have to detox- it will take a while for your body to learn how to feel as energized from complex carbs and protein as it does from simple carbs. That won't happen until you cut simple carbs out of your diet.

Does caffeine help you at all?

ana futura
03-06-13, 02:36 PM
Are you familiar with the glycemic index?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-glycemic_diet

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 02:48 PM
no, caffeine doesn't do much... and I suck at proper eating. My meds take away my appetite, so then I try to eat at least proteins.

And the glycemic index stuff confuses me... I've looked at it before. I'll take another gander though.

I just realized the sugar craving is back... I guess it was there before, I just never noticed it before. Now I do... and this can't be good.

I know ADHD and addiction are common together, and mine is to sugar... I guess I never realized the extent to which I needed it before.

ana futura
03-06-13, 02:56 PM
no, caffeine doesn't do much... and I suck at proper eating. My meds take away my appetite, so then I try to eat at least proteins.

And the glycemic index stuff confuses me... I've looked at it before. I'll take another gander though.

I just realized the sugar craving is back... I guess it was there before, I just never noticed it before. Now I do... and this can't be good.

I know ADHD and addiction are common together, and mine is to sugar... I guess I never realized the extent to which I needed it before.

I wouldn't link ADHD to your sugar addiction- that might make it harder to fight in your mind.

Almost all of America is addicted to simple carbs, you aren't alone. The cycle is hard to break.

The thing to understand about the Glycemic index is it's not a traditional weight loss diet- it's a ranking of the quality of carbohydrate fuels.

The better the fuel, the less likely you are to have these big swings in your energy levels. A better fuel is smoother burning and longer lasting. We need fuel for energy, and sugar is fuel- it's just that some fuels are better than others.

As a general rule you should be avoiding simple, processed carbs- like soda, or white flour. Whole grains like brown rice are complex carbs, and are slower burning.

Take a look at the GI charts- the lower the GI number, the better the fuel.

Also educate yourself about simple vs complex carbohydrates.

Exercise will help as well.

ana futura
03-06-13, 02:59 PM
Also stay far away from "low fat" foods, like reduced fat ice cream. Fat is good energy- and low fat foods often boost their flavor with added sugars. If a food is naturally low in fat, that's fine, you just want to avoid the processed "low fat" brownies and things like that- where fat is being taken out and replaced with sugar.

I think the best thing is to go cold turkey with sugar. Once you break the cycle of addiction, you won't need it anymore. It really is like detoxing from a drug.

TagEHeuer
03-06-13, 03:00 PM
I'm a sugar addict, nothing to do with ADHD. Running lately to try and treat myself and stay fit

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 03:06 PM
I don't eat reduced fat anything... don't eat white flour too much, never drink soda, but I don't like brown rice :lol:

I don't know I blame my diet on ADHD, but the extent of what I've gone through for just plain old sugar is not a simple person's desire for simple carbohydrates... It's a bit silly honestly, the lengths I once went through.

I'm doing research on the low glycemic index diet right now... maybe this is the "cure" for my complete and total lack of energy that I constantly endure.

ana futura
03-06-13, 03:19 PM
Have you gotten checked out for hyper/hypo glycemia or diabetes? You could have an underlying health issue. You sound hypoglycemic to me.

The acute administration of stimulants such as amphetamine typically produces hyperglycemia; chronic use, however, produces hypoglycemia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperglycemia

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 03:25 PM
nope... no one ever really takes me seriously.

ana futura
03-06-13, 03:31 PM
I would start following a hypoglycemic friendly diet and see if that helps. You might be borderline. A hypoglycemic diet is similar to a low GI diet- but some things that are okay on a low GI diet are not okay on a hypoglycemic diet.

http://hypoglycemia.org/hypoglycemia-diet

http://hypoglycemia.org/quiz

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 03:38 PM
lol holy crap... look at my results

ana futura
03-06-13, 03:41 PM
I figured you would do well :rolleyes: . Finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about hypoglycemia is difficult. I would do some research, check out some forums, and try to find a good doc in your area.

If you are like most sufferers of hypoglycemia, you have at this point seen at least two or three doctors and all of them tell you that nothing is wrong with you, that you are in perfect health. You feel like telling your doctor, "If I am so healthy, why do I feel so bad?" The basic problem is that the medical establishment does not recognize all of the manifestations of hypoglycemia. The generally accepted definition is that your blood glucose level has to drop below 50 mg per 100 ml in order for you to be deemed to have hypoglycemia. I was once told by an endocrinologist that I did not have hypoglycemia. He told me that he saw a lot of people like me, and that they did not have hypoglycemia either. I asked him that if so many people had similar symptoms, didn't that show that there was something there that needed to be investigated. That was about the point that he quit listening to me.

http://www.fred.net/slowup/hypotret.html

http://www.blisstree.com/2007/02/02/mental-health-well-being/why-do-doctors-dismiss-reactive-hypoglycemia/

zaleladra
03-06-13, 03:46 PM
I noticed that when I ate anything wheat-based I was very lethargic and couldn't quite function properly. I was also drinking more and more caffeine every day to get the same focus boost (not energy, but focus) and eating more and more sugar to get any energy. It was a destructive cycle just to eat bread and pasta.

I gave it all up cold turkey. Silly, cause for two weeks I was miserable and headache-y and felt like I was going to lose my job because I was making mistakes left and right (I am also currently unmedicated for my ADHD). But after those two weeks, I was doing wonderfully.

Until I was holding so strictly to the diet that when I didn't have the RIGHT foods (quickly and easily), I wasn't eating at all. That was bad for me as well. Recently I've tried making adjustments that some here have suggested and it has helped.

But the low glycemic diet is a good adjustment to make. You may want to start trying to take note of what kinds of foods you eat and how they make you feel (more than just sugar)

What I did when I was craving simple sugars like crazy was substitute that candy bar for an apple (or whatever fruit you prefer). It's a bit better for you and can get you on the right track.

Now that I seem to have a lot more energy, I have taken to caffeine (specifically coffee) again, but my limit is one shot of espresso a day. If I get more coffee, it had to be decaf. And I sip it over time instead of all at once. It seems to help my focus a bit (and steady my energy levels cause there are some simple sugars in my coffee as well but the slow intake helps).

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 03:49 PM
I figured you would do well :rolleyes: .
If you are like most sufferers of hypoglycemia, you have at this point seen at least two or three doctors and all of them tell you that nothing is wrong with you, that you are in perfect health. You feel like telling your doctor, "If I am so healthy, why do I feel so bad?" The basic problem is that the medical establishment does not recognize all of the manifestations of hypoglycemia. The generally accepted definition is that your blood glucose level has to drop below 50 mg per 100 ml in order for you to be deemed to have hypoglycemia. I was once told by an endocrinologist that I did not have hypoglycemia. He told me that he saw a lot of people like me, and that they did not have hypoglycemia either. I asked him that if so many people had similar symptoms, didn't that show that there was something there that needed to be investigated. That was about the point that he quit listening to me.

Sounds so much like what I've heard over and over and over... Thank you so much, Ana.

ana futura
03-06-13, 04:28 PM
For comparisons sake I just took that quiz and got a 26. There is some overlap there with ADHD symptoms, but your score is so high I assume it's more than just ADHD.

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 04:30 PM
For comparisons sake I just took that quiz and got a 26. There is some overlap there with ADHD symptoms, but your score is so high I assume it's more than just ADHD.

crap.

well, I've called the gp for a referral... DH seems to think you're spot on.

BellaVita
03-06-13, 04:42 PM
Hmm. :scratch:
I think you mentioned before that coffee/chocolate put you to sleep? (correct me if I'm wrong.)
Perhaps this is the only other method your body can come up with as some sort of "substitute" for that boost.

I found this:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/555638-food-cravings-after-quitting-caffeine/

Now, it has to do with after quitting caffeine, but I think the ideas mentioned in the read are rather interesting.
I have yet to find an article about stopping ADHD meds and craving sugar.

Also, from this (http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S22/88/56G31/index.xml?section=topstories) I found:
Hoebel and his team also have found that a chemical known as dopamine is released in a region of the brain known as the nucleus accumbens when hungry rats drink a sugar solution.

And...

Hungry rats that binge on sugar provoke a surge of dopamine in their brains. After a month, the structure of the brains of these rats adapts to increased dopamine levels, showing fewer of a certain type of dopamine receptor than they used to have and more opioid receptors. These dopamine and opioid systems are involved in motivation and reward, systems that control wanting and liking something.

Now, the study was done to demonstrate "that sugar can be an addictive substance." However I still think some of this information(such as what I quoted) could be deemed as useful for this topic.

Hope you find some answers soon!! :)

BellaVita
03-06-13, 04:43 PM
For comparisons sake I just took that quiz and got a 26. There is some overlap there with ADHD symptoms, but your score is so high I assume it's more than just ADHD.

I agree with ana futura.

dasikins
03-06-13, 04:48 PM
So, I'm currently not on any ADHD meds... just the other stuff in my signature. I remember before that Zoloft severely sedated me, which at the time was why I began taking a Ritalin booster when I was on Concerta... it helped the sedating effect... but now since I'm on nothing....

The only thing is sugar is the ONLY thing that helps keep me awake. Literally. I mean, I love sugar, always have, but now it's a matter of being a zombie-narcoleptic vs being awake and functioning. I slept for 4 hours yesterday after work and was only feeling mildly tired at the time... today I have to work a double, so rather than a nap, I ate ice cream... and I feel much more awake already.

Like I said, I like sugar, but this goes way beyond that.

Any ideas what this may signify? Other than just enjoying sugar?

Don't quote me on this, but this can be connected to Serotonin levels. Serotonin regulates a part of your appetite and mood. It's been linked to my Night Eating Syndrome. The reason we crave carbs or sugar are to increase our levels of Serotonin (this is one theory.) It's also used in some newly formulated dieting pill, Belviq (which I believe is only approved right now for obese individuals over a certain weight.)

Zoloft is an SSRI which is known to alter those two primary functions: eating and sleep. It's all in the Serotonin baby!

Hope this helps some!

ana futura
03-06-13, 05:00 PM
crap.

well, I've called the gp for a referral... DH seems to think you're spot on.

If you get told yet again that there's nothing wrong with you, I'd act like there is anyway. It can't hurt to go ahead and follow a hypoglycemic diet, a diet based on frequent small low GI meals would be good for anyone. Reactive hypoglycemia is an under researched area, and right now the only treatment available is management through diet (and to a lesser extent exercise).

Good luck!

Sandy4957
03-06-13, 05:22 PM
I am the same way, Silvren. I'm a major, major sugar addict.

Not like, sugar in my coffee or whatever, but candy. Specifically, fruity candy like gummi bears. You do not want to know what my eating habits were like when I was working at my old law firm and surviving on adrenaline. :o It's all I ever ate.

Now, I eat relatively well because I work from home and cook at home a lot and have access to healthier foods all day, so I don't really crave sugar constantly as I did before.

Ok, now I'm going to go try that test... :D

Sandy4957
03-06-13, 05:26 PM
Heh heh. Ok, Silvren, so here, for reference:

Hypoglycemia Quiz Results

Your Score: 58

A score higher than 20 is evidence of probable adrenal insufficiency and/or deranged carbohydrate metabolism (Hypoglycemia), and would indicate further testing.

Return to Quiz

ana futura
03-06-13, 05:32 PM
I think difficult mental activities cause sugar cravings as well. The brain needs glucose to operate, and things like candy make for really simple brain fuel.

If I am working at a physical job, I never get sugar cravings. If I'm trying to write a paper, I get unbelievable sugar cravings. I just tell my brain to shut up and try to make a real meal instead.

America's obesity problem isn't just because we move less- it's also because use our brains too much. The brain needs fuel, but using it doesn't burn calories in the way that physical exertion does.

silivrentoliel
03-06-13, 06:18 PM
Heh heh. Ok, Silvren, so here, for reference:

Hah, and I got.... What, an 86 or something?

I got to work this afternoon (still here, actually) and the first thing my client said was, "you look so tired!"

:lol:

Yes.... Yes I do.

Apparently quitting Vyvanse cold turkey can cause extreme exhaustion too.

fracturedstory
03-07-13, 12:33 AM
I understand this. When I'm not on meds I crave sugar. Fish oil works well for me but in sane humans it's supposed to take a week or more to kick in. With me it's an hour and I only think it's because fish makes me hyperactive.

Sorry, I'm not much help. Exercise? Good luck with it.

silivrentoliel
03-14-13, 06:24 PM
So, I went to the doctor on 3/11 and they ran some tests.... got a letter back today w/ the results. :doh:

CBC- normal
Chem panel- normal
Thyroid Function- normal
Liver enzymes- normal
Blood glucose- normal
Kidney function- normal

:scratch: :doh: :scratch: :doh: :scratch: :doh:

If all this is normal, then wtf is causing this extreme exhaustion.

starry
03-15-13, 09:18 AM
Lots of great info in this thread. Thanks to all who have contributed :)

I'm the same way with sugar. My whole life I've battled with it.

For me sugar has the same addictive effect that heroin probably would have, had I ever tried it.
There's no such thing for me as "I'm just going to have a little bit every day", because even small amounts can trigger endless cravings for it later.

Simple sugars are the worst and the most addictive. Complex sugars (like the fructose in fruit) cause less cravings, but at times they can as well.

The only way I was able to lose my sugar cravings was to cut off all sugar from my diet. I will one in a blue moon have a few bites of a shared desert at a restaurant, but other than that, I stay off of it completely.
And the cravings are gone, as long as I don't eat sugar.


I've posted some of this info in another thread (it was about honey) today:

One of sugar's major drawbacks is that it raises the insulin level, which inhibits the release of growth hormones, which in turn depresses the immune system. This is not something you want to take place if you want to avoid disease.

Simple sugars have been observed to aggravate asthma, move mood swings, provoke personality changes, muster mental illness, nourish nervous disorders, deliver diabetes, hurry heart disease, grow gallstones, hasten hypertension, and add arthritis.

There are 4 classes of simple sugars which are regarded by most nutritionists as "harmful" to optimal health when prolonged consumption in amounts above 15% of the carbohydrate calories are ingested: Sucrose, fructose, honey, and malts.
Although honey is a natural sweetener, it is considered a refined sugar because 96% of dry matter are simple sugars: fructose, glucose and sucrose. It is little wonder that the honey bear is the only animal found in nature with a problem with tooth-decay (honey decays teeth faster than table sugar). Honey has the highest calorie content of all sugars with 65 calories/tablespoon, compared to the 48 calories/tablespoon found in table sugar. The increased calories are bound to cause increased blood serum fatty acids, as well as weight gain, on top of the risk of more cavities.

Here is a list of ways sugar can affect your health:
• Sugar can suppress the immune system.
• Sugar can upset the body's mineral balance.
• Sugar can contribute to hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, concentration difficulties, and crankiness in children.
• Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
• Sugar can cause drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
• Sugar can reduce helpful high density cholesterol (HDLs).
• Sugar can promote an elevation of harmful cholesterol (LDLs).
• Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
• Sugar contributes to a weakened defense against bacterial infection.
• Sugar can cause kidney damage.
• Sugar can increase the risk of coronary heart disease.
• Sugar may lead to chromium deficiency.
• Sugar can cause copper deficiency.
• Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
• Sugar can increase fasting levels of blood glucose.
• Sugar can promote tooth decay.
• Sugar can produce an acidic stomach.
• Sugar can raise adrenaline levels in children.
• Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
• Sugar can speed the aging process, causing wrinkles and grey hair.
• Sugar can increase total cholesterol.
• Sugar can contribute to weight gain and obesity.
• High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
• Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
• Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
• Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
• Sugar leads to decreased glucose tolerance.
• Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
• Sugar can increase systolic blood pressure.
• Sugar causes food allergies.
• Sugar can cause free radical formation in the bloodstream.
• Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
• Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
• Sugar can overstress the pancreas, causing damage.
• Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
• Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
• Sugar can cause liver cells to divide, increasing the size of the liver.
• Sugar can increase the amount of fat in the liver.
• Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
• Sugar can cause depression.
• Sugar can increase the body's fluid retention.
• Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance.
• Sugar can cause hypertension.
• Sugar can cause headaches, including migraines.
• Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha and theta brain waves, which can alter the mind's ability to think clearly.
• Sugar can increase blood platelet adhesiveness which increases risk of blood clots and strokes.
• Sugar can increase insulin responses in those consuming high-sugar diets compared to low sugar diets.
• Sugar increases bacterial fermentation in the colon.

Sugar and cancer:
• Of the over 4 million cancer patients being treated in the U.S. today, almost none are offered any scientifically guided nutrition therapy other than being told to "just eat good foods." Many cancer patients would have a major improvement in their conditions if they controlled the supply of cancer's preferred fuel: GLUCOSE. By slowing the cancer's growth, patients make it possible for their immune systems to catch up to the disease. Controlling one's blood-glucose levels through diet, exercise, supplements, meditation and prescription drugs - when necessary - can be one of the most crucial components to a cancer treatment program. The saying "Sugar feeds cancer" is simple. The explanation is a little more involved.
• German Otto Warburg, Ph.D., the 1931 Nobel laureate in medicine, first discovered that cancer cells have a fundamentally different energy metabolism compared to healthy cells.
• The gist of his Nobel thesis was this: malignant tumors frequently exhibit an increase in "anaerobic glycolysis" - a process whereby glucose is used by cancer cells as a fuel with lactic acid as an anaerobic by-product - compared to normal tissues.
• The large amount of lactic acid produced by this fermentation of glucose from the cancer cells is then transported to the liver. This conversion of glucose to lactate creates a lower, more acidic PH in cancerous tissues as well as overall physical fatigue from lactic acid build-up. Therefore, larger tumors tend to exhibit a more acidic PH.
Hence, cancer therapies should attempt to regulate blood-glucose levels through diet, supplements, exercise, medication when necessary, gradual weight loss and stress reduction. Since cancer cells derive most of their energy from anaerobic glycolysis, the goal is not to eliminate sugars or carbohydrates entirely from the diet but rather to control blood-glucose within a narrow range to help starve the cancer cells and boost immune function.

References:

(1) Warburg O. On the origin of cancer cells. Science 1956 Feb;123:309-14.
(2) Volk T, et al. pH in human tumor xenografts: effect of intravenous administration of glucose. Br J Cancer 1993 Sep;68(3):492-500.
(3) Digirolamo M. Diet and cancer: markers, prevention and treatment. New York: Plenum Press; 1994. p 203.
(4). Leeper DB, et al. Effect of i.v. glucose versus combined i.v. plus oral glucose on human tumor extracellular pH for potential sensitization to thermoradiotherapy. Int J Hyperthermia 1998 May-Jun;14(3):257-69.
http://www.healingdaily.com/detoxifi...diet/sugar.htm

silivrentoliel
03-15-13, 10:00 AM
I can't properly respond to this from work, but good info! More once I get home...

Candlewax
07-21-13, 08:17 AM
check out potatoes not prozac by Kathleen DesMaisons, it's about sugar addiction and how to get out of it.