View Full Version : How to start biking to work?


saturday
03-12-13, 10:09 AM
I want to start biking to work. I've only ever had a mountain bike though and I havent rode regularly for years. How do I get started commuting to work via bike?

I work nine miles from where I live and I know all of the back roads, so I wouldn't be traveling in major traffic.

I want to go buy a brand new road bike. What price rage is reasonable for someone like me who is a beginner?

RedHairedWitch
03-12-13, 10:57 AM
For a commute to and from work, I'd go with a middle quality road bike, or cruising bike. Will you be locking it up outside? Don't spend a lot of money on a bike that will be left outside.

Get a quality helmet and a wind breaker. Also load up on reflectors and lights. A plastic bag for.your seat when it rains and a bike repair multi-tool so you can fix the thing.

Make sure to learn the rules and signals of road biking.

Do the ride once on a day off first and time yourself.

Don't cheap out on your lock.

Footsore Ramble
03-12-13, 11:06 AM
I love biking to work. Nine miles is a nice distance, too; you'll get some real exercise, but it's totally doable.

If you are not on a tight budget, I suggest looking into the $700-$1200 range for a new bike. You can get something really, really great at that price. I wouldn't suggest buying cheap to start with, because if you get a nice frame now, you can upgrade the components over time if you want to keep it, or you can sell it with reasonable value if you don't.

Since you are planning to commute, remember to keep part of your budget for a decent lighting system and a lock, and maybe a set of fenders, oh, and a rack and panniers. Riding while wearing a backpack is OK for now and then, but panniers are much more comfortable for a regular commute. It means you'll also want to make sure you are looking at bikes that have attachment points for these things, and fender clearance. I tend to favor touring or cyclocross style bikes, or classic sport touring bikes. I own a Surly Long Haul Trucker (http://surlybikes.com/bikes/long_haul_trucker) and I love it for commuting. The Crosscheck is another Surly bike that people favor for the kind of thing you're doing.

If you want to pay less for a nice bike, it's possible to do well on Craigslist as long as you have some idea of what size you are looking for. High quality bikes last for a long time. I have a beautiful Miyata 310 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miyata_310) from '85 that I bought for $100 on Craigslist.

DistractedGoat
03-12-13, 11:11 AM
I'd highly suggest buying an inexpensive bike to start out with, and upgrading to a more expensive bike if you decide that you enjoy it. I commute by bicycle, and paid in excess of $1000 for my daily rider - but if you decide it isn't for you, that is a whole lot of money to burn on something that will just sit in your garage.

Does your work offer a shower at work? That's always a nice amenity to have when biking into work..

I agree with all the items suggested by RedHairedWitch.. Especially on the lights. General bicycling clothing is very good to have, but give it a couple weeks to make sure its something you enjoy. Bicycling clothing isn't cheap, but padded cycling shorts are very very VERY helpful. For a 9 mile ride, you can probably go without it, but they're still nice to have. My commute is 35 miles, on days that I forget to bring padded shorts, my butt is VERY sore by the time I get home.. :)

Also, welcome to the cyclist club! I hope you enjoy it!

FogNoggin
03-12-13, 11:42 AM
http://motorbicycling.com/index.php

I made mine for about $300.00

saturday
03-12-13, 12:08 PM
I already have a motorcyle... :rolleyes:

I would be comfortable dropping 600-800 for a new bike. Though, I would still bring it inside and keep it next to my desk. Yes we have showers too, thankfully.

Thanks for the tips everyone. Keep them coming if you have more. Im totally stoked.

FogNoggin
03-12-13, 12:15 PM
No, Motor-Bi-Cycle.

donheff
03-12-13, 01:07 PM
Don't rush out and buy a road bike for commuting. Go to your local bike store and look at options. Look for something with wider tires (e.g. at least 28 or 32cm) and brazeons for attaching a rear rack (you want to carry some stuff don't you?). You may also want to consider getting a bike that can take fenders so you don't get the dreaded back stripe of wet road flyoff in the rain. Most bikes that meet these criteria will have straight handle bars. If you want to go a little more "road like" with drop bars but still want the wider tires (more comfortable) and ability to add racks, you may find a cyclocross bike that fits the ticket. After you see what's what, you might want to look at Craig's List for used bikes -- test the water with a more affordable ride.

Footsore Ramble
03-12-13, 01:43 PM
bikesdirect.com may be a good place to start browsing. Check out the city, touring, and cyclocross categories in the road section.

dvdnvwls
03-12-13, 04:48 PM
If you still have any kind of bike, just use it - at least until you know this is your permanent strategy. Especially if by back roads you mean "back roads", and not just what I would call "little highways". :)

Having a nice new bike that you don't ride anymore, is a major irritation and waste of money.

saturday
03-12-13, 04:53 PM
all these "back roads" are paved.

I wonder if there are nice bikes for rent some place? I want something nicer than what I have.

dvdnvwls
03-12-13, 05:09 PM
all these "back roads" are paved.

I wonder if there are nice bikes for rent some place? I want something nicer than what I have.

Of course get something nicer, hopefully a lot nicer - after a month of biking to work with the old one.

Footsore Ramble
03-12-13, 07:31 PM
all these "back roads" are paved.

I wonder if there are nice bikes for rent some place? I want something nicer than what I have.

You can certainly test ride bikes from your local stores. They will usually keep your driver's license as collateral and let you take a bike out for an extended ride. You could try riding your commute on a nice weekend as an out-and-back trip with a few different bikes.

If you started a bike blog like this one (http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/) or this one (http://lovelybike.blogspot.com/), you could probably persuade shops to loan you a bike for several days so that you could review it ;). But then you'd have to be witty and write a lot, and if you are like me, that sounds like too much work.

ETA: Another blog you might enjoy: http://letsgorideabike.com/blog/

BellaVita
03-12-13, 07:54 PM
Step one: start growing your own pet bike. Less expensive that way..

DistractedGoat
03-12-13, 08:01 PM
Step one: start growing your own pet bike. Less expensive that way..

This is the best idea I have heard all month.

proileri
03-13-13, 02:20 AM
all these "back roads" are paved.

I wonder if there are nice bikes for rent some place? I want something nicer than what I have.

9 miles sounds like a pretty nice distance. First thing you could do is put some slick tires on your MTB, that way it's much smoother and faster on pavement. Changing to a proper road bike, you gain maybe 3-4 MPH in cruising speed and the bike feels more snappy, but you lose a bit in comfort and the ability to handle rough spots. However, while a few miles would be ok on a pavement MTB, at around 9 miles you probably would start to appreciate a faster bike, especially if you have long open stretches of road where the max. cruising speed can be utilized.

If you want a new bike, I'd say look for something around $600-700 range which should get you a basic "fast commuting" style bike. You could go a bit over a grand, if you want to invest a bit more into it. Fortunately manufacturers are starting to come out with faster and faster commuting bikes today. As others, I would also recommend going with a bike that allows 30-40 mm wide tires (often referred as cyclocross), which is what commuting-style bikes usually come with. This makes the bike versatile, as you can put on some slightly knobbed tires and hit gravel roads, or you can put on narrow road tires that are bit faster and lighter.

I'd also recommend trying out a bunch of different bikes, and different frame sizes. The stores have sizing charts for frames, but you could go +/-1 size based on what feels the best. In general it's better to have a slightly small frame than a slightly large frame.

Footsore Ramble
03-14-13, 03:04 PM
Keep us posted, saturday (if you don't mind). I am vicariously enjoying the bicycle shopping experience through you right now :)

Note to self: no, you don't need another bike. Sigh.

saturday
03-14-13, 03:49 PM
Im becoming a bike shop junkie. :p I take forever to make a decission, but also the people there are so nice and fun to talk to. I'll post pictures when I decide on a bike.

ADDarren
03-14-13, 05:13 PM
Last summer, I put road tires on my mountain bike for riding to work.
I ride 4 miles to work but only when weather is good.
I also have a small bag with a spare tire and a small pump, in case of a flat.

I may consider a new bike some time in the future, if I find I'm riding more.

Regards

proileri
03-16-13, 11:17 AM
Oh, while at it, check out cycling shoes and compatible pedals with bindings. It's called a clipless system, which I found most confusing at first, as it uses cleats in the bottom of the shoe that click into the pedal. There's a noticeable difference in pedaling efficiency in the long run.

saturday
03-16-13, 12:18 PM
Im not sure about the cleats. Is it easy to unclick them? I would be nervous having my feet conected to the bike unless I could easily get them off when needed.

Footsore Ramble
03-16-13, 11:52 PM
Clipless pedals take a little practice, but they are nice once you get the hang of them. And some are easier to get in/out of than others. If you go that route, I'd recommend Crank Brothers Eggbeaters.

However, there are other ways to 'stick' your feet onto pedals that have some of the same advantages as clipless, but don't require that you wear a particular set of shoes. I'm about to order a set of these pedals (http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/components/pedals/mks-lambda-pedal.html) for one of my bikes -- very grippy and comfortable.

My touring bike has Power Grips on it, because I want to be able to ride it with my hiking boots or work shoes and still have retention. They are less comfortable than clipless pedals, but it only makes a difference to me after several hours of riding.

Keep in mind that stock pedals are usually kind of cheap, since you are expected to want to customize. The same is true for saddles.

ana futura
03-17-13, 12:56 AM
Slick tires on the mtb is the way to go for right now. Start now! Don't let bike shopping get in the way of bike riding.

Personally, I think dedicated commuter bikes are silly. I own a lot of bikes, and I commute on all of them. The bike I ride depends on the weather and my mood- you need a good weather bike and a bad weather bike - or - a fast bike and a slow bike. If I were you, and I already had an mtb that can serve as a bad weather bike (adding fenders and slicks), I'd get something fun and fast for good weather. Whether or not you need a rear rack depends on your job- I always commuted with just a large saddle bag, but I didn't have to bring much with me to work. I also don't use clipless pedals for commuting, as I don't like having to bring spare shoes. I may change my tune on that one though- my last commute was 34 miles RT, and I would often get foot cramps from riding with sneakers and clips and straps.


Everyone has a different style- you have to find what works for you. I like fast bikes. Slow bikes laden down with lots of junk bore me. I like wider tires than most roadies do though- 700x32 is just wide enough to bomb through pot holes without consequence.

Other people prefer tanks with disc brakes, racks that can carry 80 pounds of gear, and even wider tires. At the other extreme I've seen people commute on 700x23s and full carbon bikes. You'll figure out pretty quickly if you value speed or comfort more, but dialing in bikes is a never ending process.

ana futura
03-17-13, 01:10 AM
I wonder if there are nice bikes for rent some place? I want something nicer than what I have.

Yes, there are! Call your local bike shops- some actually rent high end road bikes. It's a great way to try out different bikes. Also, when you're shopping, ride as many bikes as you can. Make sure the shop will switch out stems for you and check out your fit- fit is the number one most important thing to consider when buying a bike.

Road bikes are not forgiving with fit AT ALL. Mountain bikes can be fudged a bit, road bikes can not. Riding an ill fitting road bike will be the most uncomortable experience you will ever have. All other concerns come second to fit.

I buy the brands that fit me best. I like surly bikes, but they are all wrong for my build- which makes them unpleasant to ride without sticking very short stems on them- which compromise the handling.

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 04:54 AM
I want to start biking to work. I've only ever had a mountain bike though and I havent rode regularly for years. How do I get started commuting to work via bike?


egads! how did I miss this thread!!! What craigslist market are you in? I'm totally going to start watching for bikes in your area! ;)



Don't cheap out on your lock.


u-lock u-lock u-lock... even an inexpensive one at Mal*Wart... no cables, they are too easy to cut.

bikesdirect.com may be a good place to start browsing. Check out the city, touring, and cyclocross categories in the road section.

I agree with the touring or cyclocross, but I really hesitate to push someone towards bikesdirect unless then are already familiar with adjusting bearings and truing wheels...

Step one: start growing your own pet bike. Less expensive that way..

Not really less expensive, I've grown several now and my wallet isn't getting any bigger.

stef
03-17-13, 05:00 AM
wow no idea there was so much info...
what would you recommend for riding on paved roads without much traffic , for occasional exercise? how many speeds etc?
i would love to get a bike, there are tons of nice areas to ride where we live.
is it ok to get a good used bike?

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 05:23 AM
@stef, used bikes are fine... just don't over pay and be aware of what needs replaced. It's generally best to have a friend who can go shopping with you.

Just like with cars, bikes essentially lose 50% of value as soon as they leave the bike shop (you'll see the internet short hand LBS a lot, which stands for local-bike-shop).

All of the bikes that I currently own are second-hand. The only brand-new bike that I did own, I ended up selling when I moved from mtb (mountain bike) to more road friendly bikes.

Choices for paved road without much traffic:

You're in Europe, right? Most will be riding flat-bar (mtb style) as opposed to "drops" over there. Anything from a dedicated commuter to a rebuilt mountain bike will work.

hard-tail mtb - 26" wheels, but use "slicks" which are road tires. Some are called "29ers" which just means they are larger wheels/tires.

hybrid/commuter/fitness bike - usually 700c (metric, but roughly the same as the 29er size mentioned above). These all have the flat handlebar style.

cyclocross - it's a road bike, 700c tires, drop bars. a better choice than a "road bike" because cross bikes will have clearance for wider tires (not the really skinny 23mm ones). They are generally more "up-right" meaning not as aggressive/racey as a "road bike."

"commuter" - same as a cross bike, usually in the mid range of price and specially marketed as a bike for, well, commuting.

touring - also wider tires. In Europe, a "touring bike" will have a flat handlebar. In the US it will normally have drops. Most are made of steel. These are built to carry the most weight and always have extra mounts for racks/bags/etc.

You may also see "650b" wheels/tires. This is a size between the 26" mtb tire and the 700c. They are better for smaller riders and are currently making a comeback. The French have held out on these for years while everyone else ignored them.

There are also 27" wheels/tires, but these are an American only thing and mostly on old bikes from before the 1980s. These are best avoided, due to the large amount of upgrades that they would likely require (but if you can get a good one for less than $100, they aren't always a bad choice... rust is likely an issue on this type of bike which is old, cheap steel, heavy...).

Shifters:

flat-bar/mtb: for the most part, Shimano or Sram
Integrated-with-brake: Shimano "STI" Campagnolo "ERGO" SRam "doubletap" are the marketing terms.
Older bikes (and some touring bikes) will have "bar-ends" or possibly "down-tube" shifters. Some older bikes have "stem shifters" which are best avoided.

Speeds:
Try to avoid anything lower than 8-speeds (Shimano/SRam) or 9-speed(campagnolo) to avoid headaches with compatibility. 10 speeds are still more or less the current standard, but all three major companies now offer an 11 speed. Ten speeds are more reliable (wider chain). There are also "electronic" shifting, but that is overpriced and more than you need/want.

If you ride on hills, you want a compact-double or a triple gear set up in the front. If it's all flat, it doesn't matter so much and you might actually be perfectly content with a single-speed (or a multiple speed internally-geared hub).

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 05:31 AM
Note to self: no, you don't need another bike. Sigh.

n+1 ;)

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 05:42 AM
Some recommendations (for saturday)

Check out the All-City Space Horse, Specialized tricross, Kona Jake, Jamis Satellite, Salsa Vaya... are all respected commuters (in the same class as surly cross-check, stay away from the LHT long-haul-trucker which is overkill). Unless of course, you want a flat bar... which would require me to make another list.

stef
03-17-13, 06:25 AM
wow thank you!
well im going to have to look some of this up and translate it
i really dont want some agressive mountian bike, i guess i was thinking cyclocross or touring but i didnt know what they were called!

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 10:52 AM
stef, mtbs aren't aggressive, they are upright and easy to ride in traffic... you just need to find one that is geared (retrofitted?) for street use. The biggest problem with mountainbikes is that you don't want any springy-suspension, that just adds weight and makes no sense when you aren't running over big rocks and branches.

It ultimately comes down to a preference for the curved drop-handlebars vs. flat. It's easier to transition to flat bars if you haven't been on a bike since childhood. But, once you are used to the drop-bars, they are much preferred for longer rides. I have no idea what the selection looks like in France. I have friends over there, but none of them are cyclists, unfortunately, or I'd go pester them with questions.

Focus bikes out of Germany can be had on the cheaper end and are a good quality, you may want to check out their site. If you want to consider the mail-order route, Ribble is a British retailer that might have something you like under their own generic house label. I'm not sure if there are any French manufacturers anymore (I think Peugeot is dead and Motobecane and Mercier became asian a long time ago... those were the big names) Try Gitane or the cycleurope website. There are still a lot of Italian manufacturers with Bianchi being the standard bearer.

Re: translation... http://sheldonbrown.com/fren-eng.html

stef
03-17-13, 11:49 AM
stef, mtbs aren't aggressive, they are upright and easy to ride in traffic... you just need to find one that is geared (retrofitted?) for street use. The biggest problem with mountainbikes is that you don't want any springy-suspension, that just adds weight and makes no sense when you aren't running over big rocks and branches.

It ultimately comes down to a preference for the curved drop-handlebars vs. flat. It's easier to transition to flat bars if you haven't been on a bike since childhood. But, once you are used to the drop-bars, they are much preferred for longer rides. I have no idea what the selection looks like in France. I have friends over there, but none of them are cyclists, unfortunately, or I'd go pester them with questions.

]
wow again, you so much!
sorrry maybe agressive is the wrong word here.

Twiggy
03-17-13, 12:11 PM
Don't buy a new bike. A lot of people want to steal bikes, especially road bikes.
The best investment is a heavy duty bike lock.

I used to ride an old cheap mountain bike 7 miles one way to/from High School. It's definitely worth it. Have fun and be safe!!

DistractedGoat
03-17-13, 12:16 PM
Don't buy a new bike. A lot of people want to steal bikes, especially road bikes.
The best investment is a heavy duty bike lock.


Very true. I keep my bicycle in my cubicle at work; at school, I kind of have to take my chances (but, fortunately, I go to a university on a small campus with very low crime).. Having a secure place to keep your bike is very useful.

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 01:27 PM
Very true. I keep my bicycle in my cubicle at work; at school, I kind of have to take my chances (but, fortunately, I go to a university on a small campus with very low crime).. Having a secure place to keep your bike is very useful.

In hindsight, I'm lucky my bike wasn't stolen as it was locked with a simple cable-lock everyday for almost a year on the UW campus.

ana futura
03-17-13, 01:37 PM
Don't buy a new bike. A lot of people want to steal bikes, especially road bikes.
The best investment is a heavy duty bike lock.

I used to ride an old cheap mountain bike 7 miles one way to/from High School. It's definitely worth it. Have fun and be safe!!

I agree. The only reason to buy a new bike would be to take my riding to a new level- say I wanted to start riding recreationally, and training for centuries.

I find I can handle any distance under 30 miles on any sort of bike. But on longer rides, 40 miles or more, I'm really happy I have a road bike. On those rides I get suited up in my spandex bike gear, go for a ride, and then come straight home.

If you're only commuting and knocking around town at this point, a new bike is a waste- and probably will get stolen.

ana futura
03-17-13, 01:40 PM
I'm picturing Stef on something like this-http://civiacycles.com/files/bikes/2013_tc_st_5spd_igh.jpg

stef
03-17-13, 02:33 PM
thats exactly what i was thinking of!
you even got the color right :)

ana futura
03-17-13, 02:51 PM
That bike is made by Civia. I'll come up with some similar European brands for you to look into.

Footsore Ramble
03-17-13, 03:43 PM
I agree with the touring or cyclocross, but I really hesitate to push someone towards bikesdirect unless then are already familiar with adjusting bearings and truing wheels...


I was thinking more for brainstorming than actual purchase at this point.

+1 on the Sheldon Brown link. I meant to post that at some point and forgot. :)

But boo on calling the Long Haul Trucker overkill. ;) True, it's more bike that is needed for just commuting, but mine has inspirational value to me. I hardly ever get the chance to tour, but because I have a setup for it, I can make spur of the moment decisions to do things like overnight rides. And I need that kind of imagination fuel.

When I started getting back into bicycle riding, I already had a totally practical commuting bike -- a Giant Cypress. It worked fine for me for many years, but it had no poetry. I wanted something more 'me'. Practicality is good, but the bike that gets me riding is the one that says 'Look at me. I'm awesome. I'm beautiful. You know you want to be seen on me!', which is why, although I think the advice to sunday to just use (her?) existing MTB is good, I can sympathize if she wants something new just because.

ETA: I hope I don't sound argumentative in this post. I'm just trying to use the comments in this thread to expand more on the more meta aspects of choosing a bicycle. As always, other's mileage may vary, and that's cool.

ana futura
03-17-13, 04:02 PM
But boo on calling the Long Haul Trucker overkill.


No way dude. Long haul trucker = OVERKILL. Horses for courses, but that bike bores me silly. And yes, I've ridden one, a couple times. Loading touring geometry is just not fun when you aren't loaded touring.

It might work for some, but it does not work for me. I would never advise a newbie with no intention of touring to get one. Plus, have you ever toured with a light kit on a light bike? It is SO MUCH MORE FUN.

I ride an older salsa casseroll for touring.

Twiggy
03-17-13, 04:15 PM
Right now I have a basic cheap single-speed bike that I got from a friend. Looks like a women's beach cruiser.
It gets me from point A to B quite well without getting stolen when locked up at school or anywhere else.

Footsore Ramble
03-17-13, 04:30 PM
No way dude. Long haul trucker = OVERKILL. Horses for courses, but that bike bores me silly. And yes, I've ridden one, a couple times. Loading touring geometry is just not fun when you aren't loaded touring.

It might work for some, but it does not work for me. I would never advise a newbie with no intention of touring to get one. Plus, have you ever toured with a light kit on a light bike? It is SO MUCH MORE FUN.

I ride an older salsa casseroll for touring.

Well, I wasn't recommending it, exactly. And yes, I've put light kit on a lighter bike, and that's fun (too). But I like the loaded touring geometry. When I get going on that thing, I feel like I can ride it forever. And if I happen to pass a yard sale on the way and see a pair of skis that I need to buy, or a piano (j/k), no problem! :)

But that's neither here nor there. The real point is that we're demonstrating pretty well that you need to get out a ride a few different types of bikes before you really know what you want, because it's different for everyone.

I've never ridden a casseroll, but I'd like to. They look nice.

saturday
03-17-13, 05:48 PM
Update.

I took a 7.2 FX Trek hybrid bike for a test ride yesterday, 10.6 miles. I cant not beleive the difference. It was so much lighter than my bike. The price range is good. I will def need a different seat, my butt huurts!

My game plan is to window shop for the next month, research, ride, research, and then look for a used one on craigslist.

What do you guys think of Trek bikes?

ana futura
03-17-13, 06:20 PM
What do you guys think of Trek bikes?

They are fine. Many of the big name bikes (like trek and specialized) are all manufactured in the same factory (owned by Giant) :eek:

But they are all good. As long as you buy a bike store brand, you are fine. Trek, Kona, Specialized, Scott, Raleigh, Giant, Felt, Marin, Cannondale, Redline, KHS (and a few more)- any would be a fine choice.

Personally I like Scott, Kona, and Raleigh because I think you get good bang for your buck with them.

The main "name brand" to avoid is Schwinn- they used to make great bikes, but now they are a completely different company. They're a department store brand now, and their bikes are horrible.

Footsore Ramble
03-17-13, 06:34 PM
I think that's the same model a friend of mine got about a year ago, and he absolutely loves it. I'll ask him if he's had any issues worth noting so far.

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 06:51 PM
What do you guys think of Trek bikes?

If you like the FX, (unless it is used) go with at least the 7.3 which is just more bang for the buck (I've researched that before).

Some alternatives to look at are the Specialized Vita, Kona Dew, and Jamis Coda. If you can find a Gary Fisher Wingra (made by Trek in the past, but now a dropped model) it is more bang for the buck than the FX series. On the used market, the older versions of the FX were called 7300 instead of 7.3 (but still had the FX monicker, I believe... avoid their "comfort bikes" with a front suspension fork).

Trek is OK. I have a 520. The fact that it is ana futura approved adds value imho. :lol:

I like the older models, especially the lemond bikes... I think that new Treks are overpriced for what you get.

ana futura
03-17-13, 07:54 PM
Oh, I forgot Jamis! Jamis is a really good value too. And those Civia bikes look pretty sweet.

Drewbacca
03-17-13, 09:48 PM
I'm picturing Stef on something like this-

I believe that both Kona and Raleigh have a new "mixte" out this year... but I'm not sure of availability in Europe since they are out of Asia (both companies design in WA state). I imagine that France caters to that style and that there will be more options over there than back in the states.

Footsore Ramble
03-17-13, 11:21 PM
My friend just wrote me back, and this is what he said:

"I love it, plus it gets compliments in the street. Strange, because it's not a particularly expensive bike.."

Not the most technical of reviews, but I know he rides it pretty much daily.

Drewbacca
03-18-13, 05:45 AM
ETA: I hope I don't sound argumentative in this post. I'm just trying to use the comments in this thread to expand more on the more meta aspects of choosing a bicycle. As always, other's mileage may vary, and that's cool.

This is an ADD forum... we all tend to sound argumentative. Further more, this is the internet, we all tend to sound argumentative. Further more, we are talking about bikes. ;)

Found an old note with some Trek FX competitors, just to throw it out there:

Trek (fx), Gary Fisher (wingra), Specialized(sirrus/vita), Kona (Dew), Cannondale (Quick/Road-Warrior), Marin (Sausalito/a bunch of other ones, sold at REI), Jamis (coda/Allegro), GT (Tachyon), Fuji (Absolute), Raleigh(Misceo/Cadent), Scott (SUB), Focus (Wasgo, Planet, Maleta), Giant (Dash/Escape), Felt (verza).

It really gets fun once you want more than one TYPE of bike :LOL:
If you saw my to-buy list you'd think I have OCD or that I was a hoarder (I'm not).

proileri
03-18-13, 08:46 AM
Yep, there's a lot of different styles of bikes on the market, and people often go to great lengths to find optimal ones for their own uses (and the numerous styles of cycling sports there are). Hence there's a lot of 'geek talk' in cycling community.

In general, I don't think there's a huge difference between the manufacturers on the market - some differences, of course, but it's more about your personal choice and what happens to be available in your area.

I think the major tradeoff is between high cruising speed vs. good maneuverability and visibility. Basically it comes down how upright you sit in the saddle, as more upright position means slower speed but more comfort and control.

In busy downtown area (European cities, especially) traffic and obstacles prevent you from going very fast anyway, so you'll be happier focusing in comfort, maneuvering, ability to take a few bumps etc.. Bikes with upright riding position, straight bars and wider cushy tires, like cruiser bikes and urban MTBs, tend to be more suitable in such slow-speed environments.

On long open stretches of road and over longer distances, you tend to be happier if you can achieve a higher cruising speed, so going more towards a road-style bike with drop bars, narrow tires and an aggressive "as low as you can get" riding position tends to be more fun. These bikes are built specifically for high speeds on the open road, and sacrifice comfort and control to achieve most aerodynamic position possible.

On the seat front, harder is better for longer rides. If you sit on your hands, you can feel the two hard "sitting bones" aka bottom of your pelvic bone. These carry your weight when riding a hard seat. What happens with soft seats, is the bones sink into the cushion, so more of your weight is carried by soft tissues, making them lose circulation and making it uncomfy. The seat width is optimal when the bones sit on top of it nicely but not much wider, so it doesn't rub your thighs.

Drewbacca
03-18-13, 02:16 PM
I would add re: seat issues, that it's not so much a hard vs soft saddle that puts extra weight on your sit bones...

There are three points of contact on a bicycle, the pedal, the handlebars, and the seat. When you take a more aggressive position, then a lot of the weight ends up on your feet while you pedal. If you don't pedal hard, then a lot of that weight naturally falls to the posterior (and to the hands, to a lesser extent, hand/wrist pain is also common).

The more weight on the sit-bones, the more supportive the saddle has to be (why we call it a saddle instead of a seat is beyond me, but that is the norm; it should be noted that while cyclists sit on a saddle... the saddle itself sits on a "seat-post." LOL).

Buying a good saddle can be as difficult as buying the bike itself. I found one that I specifically love for any ride from touring to 100miles (centuries) to just around the neighborhood. That saddle is the Terry Liberator. The funny thing is that if you read the reviews on REI, they are highly mixed. So again, it really varies from person to person.

Footsore Ramble
03-18-13, 03:30 PM
Drewbacca, I suspect we stick with 'saddle' for the cool factor. If your seat is a saddle, then your bike is a steed, and you are a cowboy or knight (or possibly a wizard) :P; whereas if your seat is a seat, then your bike is just a thing with a seat on it.

Bike stores often have loaner saddles that you can try before you buy, at least for the more expensive models. I will swear by leather, myself -- all of my bike either have a Brooks or knockoff. It's a good thing I'm not vegan, because I have no idea what I'd get otherwise. I've tried a lot of saddles, and a Brooks B-17 style has been the most consistently comfortable and long-lasting (for some reason my butt is really hard on saddles, and I've destroyed several).

If you are interested in trying out a Brooks (or knockoff), there are some mail-order deals where you can buy one and return it if you decide it's not for you, and it's also possible to score them on craigslist and sell them back for about the same price if you don't want to keep it. But saddles are even more subjective than bikes themselves, so it's really hard to make a concrete suggestion until you've put some miles on a few different types.

proileri
03-18-13, 04:19 PM
Someone asked about the number of gears - it's usually not a big deal, as long as there are a few smaller gears for making uphills easier and a few bigger gears for increasing your speed in downhills. In theory, more gears is better as it's easier to stay in the optimal resistance zone, but unless you commute up and down a mountain, for a few-mile distance you'd be fine with as few as 3-7.

The two usual gear ranges are 3-7 gears for a few-mile city bikes, 20-30 gears for better performance on 5 miles or more. There aren't any huge advantages or disadvantages in a specific number of gears, so while "more = better" in theory, anything around those numbers is fine for most people.

Drewbacca
03-18-13, 04:52 PM
Gears: Gears are funny, there are so many possible combinations and it varies so much from one geographic location to another that it's almost pointless to talk about. I said before to only go with 8 or more... but really, it depends on the drive train. I said eight because a lot of wheels with 7-speed hubs aren't upgradeable and 7-speed cassettes are getting harder to find (this is a moot point for a 3,4,5,6,7, etc. internally geared hub).

Being new to cycling, the number of gears don't matter much, as proileri suggests. Regardless of whether you have a 7speed or an 11speed, the overall range is about the same. What changes is how big the gaps are in between gears. For casual riding, the gaps aren't a concern. For a racer looking for maximum efficiency or the OCD-casual-rider, more gears find it easy to find just-the-right-gear.

Saddles: if the name is cool, why don't we call bikes a replacement-horse? oh, and I prefer "enchanter" but some, call me "tim?" I like Brooks. I have a Brooks from 1977 which was initially in a poor state of neglect. You can sand leather, btw. I eventually got the excess dye out, smoothed out the cracks, got enough moisture back in to it for the appropriate amount of moisture and now it (more-or-less) rides fine for a 35 year old saddle that has been through hell... that alone, is a selling point.

ana futura
03-18-13, 11:27 PM
Everyone goes on about how evil soft squishy saddles are, but I can't pry my partner off of hers. I have tried many times. I think if you don't ride much, soft and squishy can be nice. Or if you are not willing to wear shorts with a padded butt.

My personal preference is Brooks. I hate anything with a cut out.

and having only one gear is the coolest, of course.

I really should get a job again so I can have an excuse to ride my bike somewhere.

proileri
03-19-13, 06:39 AM
Everyone goes on about how evil soft squishy saddles are, but I can't pry my partner off of hers. I have tried many times. I think if you don't ride much, soft and squishy can be nice. Or if you are not willing to wear shorts with a padded butt.


Oh yeah, on shorter trips a soft saddle is nice, as it doesn't put so much pressure on the bones and you don't feel much numbness no matter how you sit. At 30 minutes or so (or after 5 miles!), the issues with downstairs circulation start to get annoying, that's when you start hoping for a harder saddle :p

I'm coining this "5 miles rule", fits so well with everything :lol:

someothertime
03-20-13, 09:53 AM
1. Maintenance ) roadside (
2. Protective gear
3. Dedication
4. A great big fat stinkin smile everyday :)

proileri
03-22-13, 08:52 PM
As we have a lot of talk on this thread, I might so bold as to poke it towards general cycling thread.. if you don't mind?

Here in the "European Alaska" we're still a few weeks from above freezing weather and iceless bike routes.. Of course you could ride on the packed snow as the pedestrian routes are cleaned routinely, but my lungs dislike the cold air, so winter cycling is not for me.

The springtime sun is starting to come out more often, which has awoken my credit card from it's slumber, and recently got at it to order some new parts "I need" for my bikes (yes, multiple bikes).. so at least I'll be busy in the "shop" (my hallway/living room!) while waiting for the bike season to start. Meanwhile, I can also start some exercise bike work at the gym, to warm my legs up a bit :)

As you can perhaps tell, cycling is one of those hobbies where you can spend as much time and money as you want to - often without noticing it yourself! You know you have caught the bug badly, when owning two or more bikes for different uses starts to make perfect sense.. :lol:

ana futura
03-22-13, 10:46 PM
As you can perhaps tell, cycling is one of those hobbies where you can spend as much time and money as you want to - often without noticing it yourself! You know you have caught the bug badly, when owning two or more bikes for different uses starts to make perfect sense.. :lol:

I have just discovered skiing- I thought I was safe there. How could I possibly need more than one set of skis?! Little did I know, one needs at least as many skis as bikes.

dvdnvwls
03-22-13, 11:10 PM
Little did I know, one needs at least as many skis as bikes.

I thought one set for downhill, and another set for uphill, would be enough? :)

ana futura
03-22-13, 11:17 PM
I thought one set for downhill, and another set for uphill, would be enough? :)

Different skis for different snow! There are so many different types of snow...

Drewbacca
03-22-13, 11:27 PM
Different skis for different snow! There are so many different types of snow...

But only one kind of snow I like... no-snow. C'mon SPring!!! I'm sick of cycling in this crap!!!

SB_UK
03-24-13, 08:12 AM
Apparently it's well known in A&E that many accidents result in your glasses shattering and leading to potentially quite serious problems.
I've just had it happen and the glasses did shatter and just missed my eye.

So - all of you cyclists with glasses - make sure you get safety specs, a helmet, and maybe wrist, knee and elbow protection (I'm just going to use rollerblading protective pads from now on).

saturday
03-24-13, 12:18 PM
Hey ladies, do you ride womens specific bikes? Im 174cm tall and I have about 81.5cm for my inseam. The *guy* at the bike shop that I've been going to thinks Im tall enough for it not to matter.

Thoughts?

SB_UK
03-24-13, 01:27 PM
Or if you are not willing to wear shorts with a padded butt.

How about ?

mod edit: please google "men's bumper liner"

I've just discovered them - 4 padded lycra shorts too late!!

My personal love is having as little as possible - that dooby 'd allow me to reduce my number of clothes down by a significant percentage.

Ebay has 'em for just £4.

I don't know.

Drewbacca
03-24-13, 01:36 PM
women-specific...

I've helped several lady friends bike shop, so I think my opinion is as good as anyone's. ;)

You have a typical female body, in that, while you are shorter than me overall... you have longer legs (and thus, a relatively shorter torso). Therefor, on a "men's" bike that would be appropriate for your height, you would likely find the reach (to the handlebars) a bit of a stretch (this can *usually* be compensated for by using a shorter stem).

When a bike company makes a women-specific model, they make the top tube shorter to compensate. For really short girls (closer to the 5ft mark and under), this is more helpful than taller women. As you get taller, the need for a woman-specific bicycle is reduced due to a number of factors that I won't break down... suffice it to say, that a shorter stem alone would probably be adequate. So, that is where the guy at the bike shop was coming from; he probably knows what he is talking about.

It ultimately comes down to preference. You just need to test ride and see what feels right. The last two women that I shopped with ended up buying a "men's" or more appropriately a gender-neutral bicycle from companies that don't even offer a woman-specific model. For the most part, women-specific is just a marketing gimmick with "girly colors." But, sometimes a woman will find that model more comfortable... you just need to compare for yourself.

While shopping with the gf, she preferred the men's version of the Trek FX over the women-specific model (but she has shorter legs than most women of the same height, and a slightly longer torso... not so much as a man's, but relatively somewhere in the middle). However, when test riding the Specialized models (sirrus vs vita), she actually preferred the woman-specific model (vita) over the men's. So, tastes and experience will vary.

proileri
03-24-13, 02:53 PM
Im not sure about the cleats. Is it easy to unclick them? I would be nervous having my feet conected to the bike unless I could easily get them off when needed.

Oh yeah, forgot to answer this, sorry :o

The cleats pop off by twisting the heel out, which can be adjusted in tightness, so it's quite easy to get them off once you get it down. However, they do cause a half-a-second lag when putting the foot down, so forgetting you have cleats on can lead to you falling on your side, if you have a tendency to put your foot down at last moment.

Of course, they are not a must at first, so there's no hurry to try them. You start to appreciate the benefits when you start cycling longer distances on more regular basis, however. After getting used to cleats, it's hard to go back to regular pedals.

Footsore Ramble
03-25-13, 02:09 PM
Hey ladies, do you ride womens specific bikes? Im 174cm tall and I have about 81.5cm for my inseam. The *guy* at the bike shop that I've been going to thinks Im tall enough for it not to matter.

Thoughts?

That makes you 4 inches taller than me, and none of my bikes are women-specific in sizing.

It's not just a matter of sizing, though. 'Women-specific' frames can mean a mixte or loop (think of the top tube slanting or curving way down instead of being more-or-less horizontal) design, and these have advantages and disadvantages relative to a basic diamond frame. For one thing, you don't have to lift your leg as high to get over them. This is traditionally because women can wear skirts, so modesty, yadda yadda yadda. But it is also convenient if you are less flexible, or if your bike is loaded down with seriously heavy stuff.

I think 'Lovely Bicycle', one of the blogs I linked to above, has some great discussions about this sort of thing.

ana futura
03-25-13, 02:27 PM
That makes you 4 inches taller than me, and none of my bikes are women-specific in sizing.


Just to reiterate- Women's specific fit has very little to do with height.

It is about the relationship of the lengths of the top tube and seat tube, as well as the relative position of the bottom bracket and stem (seat tube angle and head tube angle).

Some tall women have a very tough time with off the peg men's geometry. Not all though.

I have a horrible time getting most bikes to fit right- and brands like Surly are out of the running altogether, as I'm not fond of having short stems and more than 4 cms of steer tube on my bikes.

Many bike manufacturers "cheat" with their WSD bikes, leaving the frame geometry the same and slapping a dinky, poor handling stem on the bike. Thankfully, this is getting to be a less common practice.

My WSD Terry is the best fitting bike I own, and I'm a mere 2 inches shorter than the OP. I think my inseam is actually taller though (!)

saturday
03-25-13, 02:41 PM
http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Trek-Soho-Commuter-20-/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/$(KGrHqVHJBME-eIgC0YOBPvBwC6Phg~~60_35.JPG

Ok, Im seriously thinking about this bike (one identical to it).

Its a 2010 Trek Soho (delux I think). Asking price was 545. I offered 400, they said 475, I said I would think about it.

Most reviews are good, except that some people dont like the brakes.

Opinions on internal gear hub and belt drive?

ana futura
03-25-13, 02:52 PM
Its a 2010 Trek Soho (delux I think). Asking price was 545. I offered 400, they said 475, I said I would think about it.

That is far too much to spend on a used commuter bike, IMO

At that price you are better off buying new and getting the included free tune ups from a dealer.

And, while I have spent $700 on a used bike before- the original price of the bike was well over $2000, and it was a race bike.

When you buy used, ideally you should be paying no more than a third of the original price (after shipping). Preferably less.

Drewbacca
03-25-13, 03:10 PM
Given an MSRP of $1,149.99... $475 isn't bad. Typically, bike shops won't haggle on price (they barely make any profits off bikes as it is, profit comes from the accessories). But, since it's obviously been sitting around the shop for a while, that works to your advantage.

Internal gear and belt is fine and reduces future maintenance. You may find the gearing a bit limited if you plan to ride up a lot of hills. To a large extent, that depends on your level of fitness as well. Likewise, the brakes may be an issue if you have a lot of hills (you can upgrade to the IM70) but they will be fine for a mostly flat commute.

The fact that it comes with a rack and fenders is a nice addition.

It wouldn't be my first choice for the PacNW, but it would be an awesome bike for Manhattan or Chicago with just occasional rail-trail riding. If you just want it for commuting, it's a good choice and a good price. If you want to ride centuries, it's not the best choice (but, it could still be done).

Drewbacca
03-25-13, 03:13 PM
@saturday, did you say you were buying this used? It looks like ana futura and I both read into this a different way...

Only buy used for that price if you can tell that it has seen very few miles (original tires with lots of tread will give you some idea).

saturday
03-25-13, 03:18 PM
yes its used and has original tires. Not from a shop. There are a few dings. and scratches.

(tnks from spelling correction)

Drewbacca
03-25-13, 03:47 PM
Unfortunately, wear&tear is difficult to judge for a novice. The price is fair... but only if everything is operating optimally.

I disagree with ana futura, btw, regarding a bike-shop being better because of the free adjustments. This can be a great benefit, but, it really varies from one shop to the next whether it's even worth while. She's correct, but only if it's a good shop.

When buying a bike used off of craigslist or whatever... it's best (but not necessary) to have a shop do a tune up for safety purposes. A bike like that really doesn't need much. Most of the bearings aren't serviceable, so it really just needs to have the wheel bearings regreased and adjusted and possibly the wheels trued (adjust spoke tension).

saturday
03-25-13, 03:50 PM
I think Im going to keep looking. The good thing about this time of season is there are a lot of adds for used bikes. The bad thing is the good ones seem to go fast. Or so it seems.

Drewbacca
03-25-13, 04:16 PM
Just to give you an idea:

I spent $450 on my first bike, bought at REI. A combination of things, not the least being that the bicycle simply wasn't tuned very well out of the shop, resulted in my decision to return it within a week (hurray for the REI return policy).

I spent $800 on my second (first?) bike which I bought at Gregg's Cycles in Seattle. I kept that one, but I wasn't really happy with the shopping experience. If I still lived in Seattle, I wouldn't go back to Gregg's. After many years, I ended up selling the bike because I never really was all that happy with it.

The funny thing is, I wanted a hybrid/commuter from the beginning so that I could ride to school. I had such a bad experience on the first hybrid that I rode (which wasn't put together well) that I convinced myself that I needed the wider mtb tires and ended up getting a hard-tail mtb.

A couple months after buying my brand new mtb, I found a Kona Dew Deluxe commuter on CL for $200. It was a 2005 model with a reasonable amount of wear&tear. The original price as about $600. I bought it for 1/3 of that in 2008 ( I forget what time of year).

Both bikes moved back East with me after I left WA. My next bike purchase was my Trek 520. It is a 2002 model (although it was advertised as a 2005). He wanted $450 for it in 2011. The MSRP was about $1200. It was in good shape for as many years as it had... but little wear and it had been stored indoors. Since it didn't require any immediate work, I settled on the asking price. I sold my mtb to more-or-less pay for it.

My next bike was frame only, a 1998 Schwinn (contracted out to a builder in Woodinville, WA). I needed something a little more road/race worthy but wanted a classic steel bicycle that was US made. I ended up paying $350 just for the frame and fork (which would have been well over $1000 brand new, but also well over ten years ago). I'm still spending money building that bike up with parts when I find a decent deal on ebay.

I love used bikes, but it is hit and miss. I find that the vast majority on CL are laughably overpriced... but sometimes you find a reasonable deal. The Soho isn't bad, but what really matters is whether or not it feels right to you. My biggest hesitation with the Soho is that you are stuck with the hub-brakes; they work and they get the job done... but, you're stuck with them.

My ideal bike has as much room as possible to upgrade and change things around... at the very least, I'd want v-brake or disc-brake mounts on the frame. But then, that's *my* ideal. Only you know what will work best for you and that may even change a year down the road as you get more comfortable.

I just wish I lived closer so that I could go out bike shopping with you! :D Building from a frame is a p.i.t.a. but in the end you get exactly what you want. Then again, I know exactly what I want and you probably won't figure that out for a while. Thus, your best bet is to get something that puts the smallest dent in your budget to begin with... I found a commuter for $200; when you pay that much, it doesn't matter so much if you grow out of it in a year.

Another thing to watch for, in the fall, is when bicycle rental companies sell off their fleet for dirt-cheap. Of course, that doesn't help you over the summer.

someothertime
03-25-13, 09:07 PM
I've got 7 bikes........ strangely the ones I ride the most are the cheaper ones.....

Fit is the no1 criteria.......then functionality+character :)

proileri
03-25-13, 09:28 PM
Yep, bikes are usually pretty durable and are relatively safe 2nd hand purchases. Most small parts can be fixed by simply swapping the part, and basic parts are not usually expensive.

What gives off a bad purchase are any visible cracks or big dents going through metal parts, especially in the frame, front fork, pedal crank arms or the wheels. Very simple detachable tubes like handlebar or seat post are cheap, though. When checking out a bike, visibly go through the metal parts from front to back, then ride the bike a bit. If you can't see/feel anything that's clearly broken or unusual, you're probably golden.

On the minor issues, scratches and dings aren't usually serious, although if they go badly through the paint into the metal, the spot will start to slowly rust. Minor rust is not a problem, though. Also, somewhat poor performance of brakes, gearshift etc. can usually be fixed with some adjustment and maintenance, if there's nothing visibly broken.

ana futura
03-25-13, 09:32 PM
I disagree with ana futura, btw, regarding a bike-shop being better because of the free adjustments. This can be a great benefit, but, it really varies from one shop to the next whether it's even worth while. She's correct, but only if it's a good shop.

It's not just about the tune ups- buying new gets you a warranty (at least on the frame) buying used does not.

Drewbacca
03-25-13, 09:41 PM
True. But when you buy a bike that's a few years old, it's easy to figure out ahead of time if that particular frame is problematic. I always liked the Gary Fisher Paragons from a few years ago, and I've actually contacted people with WTB postings for that particular bike that it has a very high fail rate where the weld breaks where the toptube meets the seattube.

If I had bought the bike brand new, I'd be thankful for the warranty... but even better to have not ever bought the bike at all and to now know that it should be avoided. ;)
Besides, I don't register my bikes until something goes wrong. Fortunately for my cousin, who bought my Piranha, he was able to register it years after the fact (and thus has the warranty available).

saturday
03-26-13, 11:16 AM
I bought a bike! :eek: I took my uncle with me who rides "about 4000 miles a year". He said he wasn't super familiar with the used bike market, but he said after a certain point old nice bikes will hold their value.

I got a 1999 Cannondale R800 for 400 bucks. Everything checks out accourding to my uncle, and it feels like a good ride. I'll see about getting a picture up.

saturday
03-26-13, 11:28 AM
http://www.addforums.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=1459&pictureid=10972

Footsore Ramble
03-26-13, 12:31 PM
Congratulations! :yes:

ana futura
03-26-13, 02:45 PM
I bought a bike! :eek: I took my uncle with me who rides "about 4000 miles a year". He said he wasn't super familiar with the used bike market, but he said after a certain point old nice bikes will hold their value.

I got a 1999 Cannondale R800 for 400 bucks. Everything checks out accourding to my uncle, and it feels like a good ride. I'll see about getting a picture up.

Provided that it fits you well, I think you'll be happier than you would have been with the Trek. The feel of the Trek would have been much closer to your mtb.

The Cdale is a much faster bike- and will give you the option of riding a century or joining a local cycling club. And I think you'll have an easier time of reselling it- more people are willing to spend a couple hundred on a used road bike than they are on a used hybrid. Good choice!

Keep the mtb and put some fenders on it for rainy days.

someothertime
03-26-13, 06:13 PM
Mmmmm r800....... Great taste!

proileri
03-26-13, 09:48 PM
Good job, and a good price too! Definitely a proper road bike. I ride a Cannondale R500, the Shimano 105 equipment on the R800 is good stuff and a step above my Shimano Tiagra parts.

Drewbacca
03-27-13, 09:31 PM
I like Cannondale frames, and it's USA made a few miles down the road from where I grew up. :)

1999 105 is on par with 2012 Tiagra with one less speed... which is a good place to start. I actually like nine speeds better, if for no other reason, the chains are stronger and you can actually use a SRAM powerlink for the 9-speeds.

I think you'll be happy with it. For your first upgrade, put some new brake-shoes on it (especially if it's been sitting for a while, as they get a hard surface which doesn't brake as well). The recommended pad is Kool Stop salmon colored.

With those older shifters, learn how to get the gunk out with a little wd-40 and then relube with an oil.

http://cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/bikes-and-gear/components/derailler-or-mech---rear/1297768027916-ihl9ft863ibw-670-70.jpg
Shimano (http://www.bikeradar.com/tags/shimano) STI lever failures are usually down to abuse, neglect or crashes. The force required to actuate the shifters should always be light and easy, as forcing the internal mechanism will damage it. Over many years of use or storage, the factory grease will begin gumming up and getting sticky, which is usually the reason they stop working. Use a mid to lightweight spray lube like WD-40 or GT 85 and apply generously into the mechanism, as pictured below, with a cloth or newspaper placed below to catch run-off. Actuate the shifter through the entire range and continue spraying until all détente clics have been recovered and feel positive. Re-apply a heavy weight oil such as Finish Line Cross Country Lube until action is smooth and buttery.

saturday
04-11-13, 10:00 AM
Its been raining for the last 3 days. I've decided that I hate riding in the rain.

proileri
04-17-13, 05:26 AM
Nah, just get suitable gear and you're golden. Thin mudguards such as Crud Roadracers for the bike plus goretex rain gear or something would probably be pretty comfy.

dvdnvwls
04-17-13, 05:34 AM
Its been raining for the last 3 days. I've decided that I hate riding in the rain.

Doesn't your location say "Washington?" :)

If you hate riding in the rain, then that means... you hate riding. :doh: :eek: :D

(I guess there are parts of WA where it doesn't rain 2 or 3 times a day; I've just never been to them yet.) :)

Drewbacca
06-11-13, 11:56 AM
Rainy season should be over now... say hello to the Burke-Gilman for me!