View Full Version : I think I have to know if I have aspergers - please help


Asylum
03-14-13, 01:40 AM
Is there a way to find out if I have Aspergers for sure, without seeing a doctor? I don't trust doctors anymore, but I have to know I'm an aspie or not.
I have some of the symptoms but not others. I find it hard to meet people's eyes, but this might be a learnt thing because when I was growing up, no-one in my family looked each other in the eye. I'm very awkward socially and have felt different since I was young. A psyche once suggested I was aspie because I didn't have many interests. I like reading, writing, crafts sometimes, music, general science stuff. I used to like horses but not anymore. I like animals. Does this count as not having many interests?
I like reading fiction and have no problems with abstract concepts, I'm very emotional and over sensitive to things, but very logical at the same time. Its like there's two of me talking in my head. I'm not smart, lol. Lots of aspies are very intelligent. I suspect there might be a lot of aspergers in my family, but there is no point in approaching them about it - and no-one has been diagnosed. Lately I've been feeling really frustrated about this for some reason - I feel like I have to know one way or another. How is anyone supposed to understand me if I don't??
Also, for some reason, I love aspie kids and have a really strong reaction to them. My favourite nephew turned out to have aspergers and I've been able to recognise kids with aspergers instantly. I'm not usually a clucky person, but I always want to grab and hug these kids on sight. Its wierd. I'm wierd! :o

sarahsweets
03-14-13, 04:55 AM
The only way to find out if you have a medical condition, neurological condition or mental illness is to see a doctor.

fracturedstory
03-20-13, 04:56 AM
Oh, come on, Sarah, everyone knows that I know more than doctors about Aspergers.

Haha, kidding. But I do know a lot.

Ok, interests. Not having many isn't an indicator of AS, but having narrow and highly intense focus on them and having a type of expert knowledge is common. Also, do those interests become a part of your being or are they merely things you like?

I have the obsessive tell everyone about them, kind. Mine are physics, certain bands, photography, creative writing, science fiction, activism, the Air Force and Skylanders. God, can I talk your ear off about those things.

Do you find you do the same things every day in the same order? How do you cope with change?

Do you get along with people around the same age or do you get along with younger and older people more?

Everyone wants to hug me. They think I'm cute. If you find you have a lot in common with those kids you might have AS. My nephew could either be AS or ADHD. We get along a lot and have a lot in common. The younger nephew could have high functioning autism. Apparently I'm his favourite aunt but we both don't know how to communicate with each other. It was exactly like that when I met someone else with AS.

People with AS can be emotionally sensitive, have difficulty controlling emotions and be either hypo or hypersensitive to light, sound, touch, taste and even seeing too much clutter.

Are you good at seeing details?

Do you nervously fidget and is it very repetitive? I have really stereotypical autistic motor movements: hand flapping, body rocking, but I also pick at my clothes when I'm anxious or move my fingers in or clockwise motion, or line up objects on a table. And stare at ceilings.

On socializing: I'm always misunderstanding things, becoming unsure what a person meant, and unintentionally insulting them. I also can't read body language to save myself, initiate conversation with people I don't know well, or feel any type of attachment with any person.

So yeah, answer those questions and I'll see how likely you are to be an Aspie. I've had it with doctors too. By May 18 you won't be able to get diagnosed with AS anymore so is it really worth getting an official diagnosis now?

eats_mice
03-20-13, 10:04 AM
May 18th? Why's that? My bro has AS, so I was curious about this thread.

dvdnvwls
03-20-13, 03:02 PM
The new DSM (an important psychology diagnosis manual) is being introduced at the APA conference that begins on May 18. AS has been moved under "Autism spectrum" and will no longer be a separate diagnosis according to the DSM.

SpaceBaby
03-20-13, 05:12 PM
You can get an evaluation done by a psychologist and I suppose a neurologist too.

I'm actually planning to see a psychologist for the same reason, but I'm waiting until I finish my spring classes in college so I can focus on college stuff.
By then it'll be called autism spectrum disorder.

I really like aspie kids too, ever since I learned about them I started to want to know all about autism.
In all my life though, I've only met one non-verbal autistic person and one guy with aspergers,
but back then I didn't even know what ADHD was all about, much less even autism..
I did read about "hyperkinesis" and autism in an old book before, but I never really connected the dots.
All I knew was that there was something weird about me and I sometimes could see myself in other ADHD/Aspie kids.

Asylum
03-20-13, 11:41 PM
[quote=fracturedstory;1461435]
Ok, interests. Not having many isn't an indicator of AS, but having narrow and highly intense focus on them and having a type of expert knowledge is common. Also, do those interests become a part of your being or are they merely things you like?
I have the obsessive tell everyone about them, kind. Mine are physics, certain bands, photography, creative writing, science fiction, activism, the Air Force and Skylanders. God, can I talk your ear off about those things.

Really? Because this psych said not having many interest was a sign. In all fairness to him though, he was an idiot. No, I'm not super focused or an expert on anything, they're just interests.

Do you find you do the same things every day in the same order? How do you cope with change?

If I do stuff the same every day its just becaue I don't have much going on in my life at the mo. I hate change.

Do you get along with people around the same age or do you get along with younger and older people more?

I get along with any age group but probably prefer my own age.

Everyone wants to hug me. They think I'm cute. If you find you have a lot in common with those kids you might have AS. My nephew could either be AS or ADHD. We get along a lot and have a lot in common. The younger nephew could have high functioning autism. Apparently I'm his favourite aunt but we both don't know how to communicate with each other. It was exactly like that when I met someone else with AS.

I think if anyone tried to hug me at the moment they'd get a smack in the head. :lol:

People with AS can be emotionally sensitive, have difficulty controlling emotions and be either hypo or hypersensitive to light, sound, touch, taste and even seeing too much clutter.

Too sensitive, don't display much emotion because I don't want to be vulnerable, don't think I sensitive to light etc.

Are you good at seeing details?

Am crap at details.

Do you nervously fidget and is it very repetitive? I have really stereotypical autistic motor movements: hand flapping, body rocking, but I also pick at my clothes when I'm anxious or move my fingers in or clockwise motion, or line up objects on a table. And stare at ceilings.

Am fidgity.

On socializing: I'm always misunderstanding things, becoming unsure what a person meant, and unintentionally insulting them. I also can't read body language to save myself, initiate conversation with people I don't know well, or feel any type of attachment with any person.

I'm pretty good at knowing what's going on with people. If I insult them its because I'm always saying the wrong thing. I have foot-in-mouth disease.

So yeah, answer those questions and I'll see how likely you are to be an Aspie. I've had it with doctors too. By May 18 you won't be able to get diagnosed with AS anymore so is it really worth getting an official diagnosis now?

Its not about getting an official diagnosis. Its not like there's a cure for it. Its about what's going on with me. Is it aspergers, is it learnt behaviour from having a family with too much aspergers in it (I had NO so-called NT's in my family, no normal or healthy behaviour whatsoever.) Is it something else - am I just stupid and useless and awkwald? Its very upsetting being me. I don't know how I do it. And how would you be if you were never diagnosed?

fracturedstory
03-21-13, 05:26 AM
And how would you be if you were never diagnosed?

Confused about why I can't get a job, why I'm rotten at dating, why I can't have a single conversation, why I can barely talk properly, and I'd probably still be living with a mother that was frustrated with me.

I probably wouldn't have so any health issues because I wouldn't have gone on so many meds. Oh, but I'd still be very suicidal. See, the failed relationship, the side effect from the pill that made me suicidal and finding out I had autism all occurred in the same year.

Post-diagnosis I felt relieved and I began to read and learn more and my knowledge just increased. It got better on ADHD meds. Just having that understanding and finding out what all this behaviour meant and learning how my brain was different, really made my social anxiety go away.

You don't tick many AS boxes for me. I know it's milder than autism but I've known a lot of people with it and done my research. A lot of people hate change but it's more of a fear of the unknown. We like predictability. You may not even know if you're like that. I've always had a strict automatic routine but never knew. I can now modify my routine to be more functional.

Many ADHD symptoms are similar to AS, but the attention to detail is usually exclusively to autism. People with ADHD struggle with it. They see the big picture, something people with autism struggle with.

Socially, when people with AS say something offensive they not realise it. People with ADHD know it's offensive but have an impulse control problem.

People with ADHD fidget, people with autism have respective motor movements to calm themselves, or even do it when excited. It's called stimming.

I don't think someone with AS can make themselves less vulnerable. They do this whole pretending to be normal thing but they still have poor control over emotions. They can appear flat mst of the time but this isn't forced.

Having intense special interests and an expert knowledge in them is often the most obvious sign and is quite common.

Also, doctors have their own notion of what AS is and isn't. I think your psych meant 'not many interests' as 'narrow focus.'

So, I don't think you have it. You sound more ADHD. I'm no professional though but I play one on TV.

If you want help with dealing with your symptoms then this is probably the best place for you.

Asylum
03-22-13, 04:21 AM
Good - one less thing to worry about! :-)

Vector
03-23-13, 03:36 AM
Other symptoms are:
- loving routine;
- loving structure;
- bad at superficial fast mental activities (eg someone who loves to talk, someone who is able to make very quick discisions while a sport game), but being good at deep thinking (eg mathematics, physics, philosophy and stratigy)
- wearing the same cloths, dressing functional or for comfort;
- being physically rigid and stiff during sports/gym.


I am sure that there are plenty of books at your local library or on google.books about the symtoms of autism.

Asylum
03-23-13, 04:33 AM
I've read a lot of descriptions austism and aspergers, it doesn't help. I have some symptoms, not others. I assume a whole bunch of people could say the same thing. And I'm not sure how to describe myself half the time. I can't tell you if I'm a deep thinker or not. What am I comparing it to?? I've never been in anyone's else's head.

fracturedstory
03-23-13, 06:04 AM
People with autism/AS are more technical thinkers. My psychologist told me that all the time. We talk like instruction manuals. It was really hard for me to give an opinion without regurgitating a bunch of facts. My doctor once asked me what having a migraine was like and I just spouted the symptoms I read on the Internet.
Though I'm an imitative person I'm not a very original one. I take from different subjects and come up with something on my own. I still get stuck in being way too literal.

We don't just love routine but need it. We like to know everything that will happen ever and will get angry or upset if something changes.

We do very bad with change. It's the cause of my worst anxiety. I do not travel. I need to plan plan plan before I agree to do anything slightly different.

We may have less flexible bodies, poor fine or gross motor skills and a strange posture. There's more rigity in classical autism though.

If think the most important things are: we are focused on details, have narrow interests, must have predictability, hate change and have no idea what other people are thinking or even saying sometimes.

someothertime
03-23-13, 06:25 AM
****, kind of fit most of these.....( sorry to butt in asylum ) I did mention to a psychologist once he laughed at me without even asking what my symtoms are......

-I prefer hanging with animals to people and younger and older people
-I only get things done with routine
-I'm a really technical thinker
-I have a few "passions" that i've buried myself in
-I am emotionally weak / unstable
-I always wear the same type of "functional" clothes
-I fiddle with clothing, bite inside of mouth, stare at walls try to find patterns, and "discover" things
-Have trouble looking people in the eye

Can you have both AS and ADD......... I asked someone once about the treatment for Aspergers and apparently there aren't as many options as there are as for ADHD? Anyways......i've got my hands full with this ADHD treatment so if I do have it it's mild and won;t be doing anything about it until I can concentrate better.

fracturedstory
03-24-13, 07:31 AM
Yep, you can have both. The treatment is usually in learning social skills and probably things that help help ADHD too like organization skills.
Adults usually do a lot of 'self-therapy,' I.e learning as many social skills as possible (see my latest meltdown thread), reading about behavioral psychology, neuroscience to get more of an idea how their brains are different from NTs, and either practicing social skills or focusing more on their strengths.
Oh but you can get on the pension if you struggle to find work. That's basically all a diagnosis has brought me.

Vector
03-31-13, 10:09 PM
I've read a lot of descriptions austism and aspergers, it doesn't help. I have some symptoms, not others. I assume a whole bunch of people could say the same thing. And I'm not sure how to describe myself half the time. I can't tell you if I'm a deep thinker or not. What am I comparing it to?? I've never been in anyone's else's head.

Do have someone close to you who you trust, like a relative or a very close friend. Maybe they can help you with confirming or dismissing certain autistic symtoms. You ask them whether or not you have the symptom you mention.

You wrote in your first post that the main reason for not conculting a professional is that you don't trust their opinion. Well, you are a bit right about that because psychology is not an exact science. But, how about asking the opinion of three different doctor's?

Have you already paid a visit to the autistic forum WrongPlanet. I have heard that that is a big and good forum about autism. Maybe ask them if they can help you.

There are on the internet diagnotic sites. After filling in a list of questions, the software gives you a percetage of likelyhood that you have autism. Maybe FracturedStory can give you a few addresses for these sites.

dvdnvwls
03-31-13, 10:20 PM
****, kind of fit most of these.....( sorry to butt in asylum ) I did mention to a psychologist once he laughed at me without even asking what my symtoms are......

-I prefer hanging with animals to people and younger and older people
-I only get things done with routine
-I'm a really technical thinker
-I have a few "passions" that i've buried myself in
-I am emotionally weak / unstable
-I always wear the same type of "functional" clothes
-I fiddle with clothing, bite inside of mouth, stare at walls try to find patterns, and "discover" things
-Have trouble looking people in the eye


Your idea is not wrong, but keep in mind that these things can also be part of an ADHD person. I share your list to some extent. (Not exactly the same but not so different either.)

It may be that ADHD and ASD are related - I don't think the truth is known about that.

Vector
03-31-13, 10:54 PM
You wrote in your first post that the main reason for not conculting a professional is that you don't trust their opinion. Well, you are a bit right about that because psychology is not an exact science.


Now that I am thinking about it, psychology is also highly susceptible to subjectivity. Because of these two short comings, one could even question if it may be called a science. But this would be another interesting topic. :)

Fortune
04-01-13, 03:11 AM
The only way to find out if you have a medical condition, neurological condition or mental illness is to see a doctor.

Nope, I knew before I saw a doctor. It was nice having it confirmed when I did, however.