View Full Version : Children of Abused Women at Higher Risk for Autism(Split from Early Detect of Autism)


saturday
03-23-13, 08:26 PM
I had wanted to share this link about abused women having higher chance of having autistic children.

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/03/20/17390070-women-abused-young-more-likely-to-have-autistic-kids?lite

Flia
03-24-13, 09:00 AM
Or is it maybe that autistic women have a high risk of being abused (and their children inheriting the autism)?

fracturedstory
03-25-13, 04:55 AM
True. I have seen a heap of studies focusing on the individual parent, the age of the father or grandfather or other things that sound like epigenetic factors. But very few focus on the fact that the parents could be autistic too. Or that the grandparents could be carriers of the genes...no it's their fault for having kids when they were over 50. Pleeease.

I have a friend that posts these studies everyday, basically to mock them.

So, yeah, sorry, not into these studies.

Lunacie
03-25-13, 08:41 AM
Or is it maybe that autistic women have a high risk of being abused (and their children inheriting the autism)?

It's one of those chicken/egg questions, eh? People who have been abused
or the victim of violence are more likely to develop mental disorders (esp.
depression and anxiety). People with mental health disorders (esp. autism)
are more likely to be victimized or abused.

My 11-year old g-daughter is Autistic. We knew what the stats say about
the chances of her being abused, and we dreaded the day she began
hanging out with older kids and being more independent. We found out 7
months ago that she had already been sexually abused by a friend who
also has mental health problems and is a few years older. :(

He is now "in the system" and the DA thinks he is at risk of reoffending.

fracturedstory
03-26-13, 07:14 AM
You can't develop autism from abuse, just severe neglect in childhood but it can be recoverable.

That's so horrible she was sexually abused. I was so non communicative as a child that a later known offender at our church just stopped talking to me. I was such an oblivious thing. I wandered those grounds and felt safe. It's scary thinking about what could have happened. I was also very scared of people.

Tyler Durden
03-26-13, 07:18 AM
Is neglect not a form of emotional abuse?

"One idea is that abused women may have a heightened response to stress"...

"we know very little about where the genetic risk factors lie and where the environmental risk factors lie, and very little about the combination of genetic and environmental risks."

i.e. fracturedstory, how can you be so sure?

fracturedstory
03-28-13, 05:33 AM
Is neglect not a form of emotional abuse?

"One idea is that abused women may have a heightened response to stress"...

"we know very little about where the genetic risk factors lie and where the environmental risk factors lie, and very little about the combination of genetic and environmental risks."

i.e. fracturedstory, how can you be so sure?
I suppose it is. I was thinking more of physical and sexual abuse. My bad.

Autism from severe neglect is very rare and not even referred to as actual autism. There is no official acquired autism yet like there is in ADHD.

I'm not getting into a genetics vs environmental debate. I believe it is genetic.

And I believe abuse is more likely to happen to someone with autism (naive, shy, poor at communicating) and these women pass their genes onto their children.

daveddd
03-28-13, 06:07 AM
the article is clear that there is an association , not a cause and effect

its not ruling out anything

Tyler Durden
03-28-13, 08:22 AM
I suppose it is. I was thinking more of physical and sexual abuse. My bad.

Autism from severe neglect is very rare and not even referred to as actual autism. There is no official acquired autism yet like there is in ADHD.

I'm not getting into a genetics vs environmental debate. I believe it is genetic.

And I believe abuse is more likely to happen to someone with autism (naive, shy, poor at communicating) and these women pass their genes onto their children.

No worries, you are entitled to believe autism is entirely genetic if that is what helps you, I just don't think it should be stated as fact when it is anything but.

I wasn't trying to make a "genetic vs environmental" debate, as I do not believe there is a debate, but as you have brought it up I will say that it is not, and never has been, possible to scientifically support an ENTIRELY genetic basis for ANY disorder.

n.b. It is kind of stating the obvious but genetics require environments in order to change.

As an extreme example...

Different environment = no evolution -> no genetics -> no humans -> no disorders.