View Full Version : Brain Games Are Bogus


ConcertaParent
04-08-13, 11:33 AM
Brain Games are Bogus (http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/04/brain-games-are-bogus.html?printable=true&currentPage=all) (The New Yorker article)

The conclusion: the games may yield improvements in the narrow task being trained, but this does not transfer to broader skills like the ability to read or do arithmetic, or to other measures of intelligence. Playing the games makes you better at the games, in other words, but not at anything anyone might care about in real life.
It looks like dual n-back, C8Sciences cognitive cross-training and computerized perceptual therapy that DD is doing will all be a waste of time and money just like all her ADHD drugs. :faint:

immabum
04-08-13, 12:11 PM
Could consider a musical instrument in a group setting? Soothing(well not at first!), added discipline and using different brain areas can't be a bad thing. Could help maintain some of those synaptic connections (synaptic pruning).

I would spend money on a musical instrument lessons before wasting it on any 'brain games'.

Twiggy
04-08-13, 12:25 PM
I second the musical instrument idea. It's a great way to help memory and she'll feel awesome about knowing how to play an instrument. It's good for creativity too.

Idiota
04-30-13, 06:18 AM
At least you didn't waste 1675 on it.

Adduce
05-03-13, 12:46 PM
An interesting report by an educational psychologist in the UK investigating efficacy of working memory training.

I think that the most interesting section is at the end of the report (page 22, section 4, "The role of memory skills and strategies").

This seems to say that teaching memory techniques (rather than training working memory), may be a better strategy for improving how children use their working memory abilities in the classroom.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?q=http://psych.cf.ac.uk/docs/dedpsy_topup/Working%2520Memory%2520Training%2520draft%2520v5.d oc&sa=U&ei=GMSDUbHbG6Sf0QWeg4HYCQ&ved=0CBsQFjAA&usg=AFQjCNFee-t9vOmMokyDWQdNunke3gfpfQ

Silvermoonstone
05-03-13, 09:37 PM
...I thought it was already obvious that any 'brain training' games were only helpful by stimulating practice. Consistent practice with math skills would help you recall important steps or rules...but you can do that without a fancy game.

What is intelligence anyway? Because ADHD and intelligence are not linked. If you want to get smarter, you pick up a book and start reading. Start working on practice problems and actually understand the steps you're writing down. If you want to get rid of ADHD, you...um....wait, you can't get rid of it. Nevermind. :p

Games just help make boring repetitive tasks more fun and interesting.

ILikeHats
05-06-13, 03:44 PM
Not surprised, I did these brain game things when I was younger at a place called The Drake Institute and they didn't do much in my opinion.

silivrentoliel
05-06-13, 04:50 PM
brain games are like standardized testing. once you get the hang of it, you can ace them w/o really knowing much of the info that you're being tested on.

eclectic beagle
05-07-13, 08:42 PM
...I thought it was already obvious that any 'brain training' games were only helpful by stimulating practice. Consistent practice with math skills would help you recall important steps or rules...but you can do that without a fancy game.

What is intelligence anyway? Because ADHD and intelligence are not linked. If you want to get smarter, you pick up a book and start reading. Start working on practice problems and actually understand the steps you're writing down. If you want to get rid of ADHD, you...um....wait, you can't get rid of it. Nevermind. :p

Games just help make boring repetitive tasks more fun and interesting.

Interesting about the reading bit, because supposedly intense preparation for the lsat increases connections across parts of the brain associated with reasoning ability. Also, exercise is a potent way to increase brain efficiency.

Agreed about the brain games, the only performance increase that I'm aware of is that dealing with the specific task being repeated.