View Full Version : if you meet the buddha on the road, kill him


Blanched Dubois
05-03-13, 09:45 PM
one of the best books i've ever read way back before the intrusion of the senses was relentless

and as far as 'spiritual' stuff? i'll save u lots of money cus i've found no truths that mean more than this ...that if you go within, you'll never go without

and this partial register of 'eternal truths' helps those helping themselves instead of giving power to that which will never know you as well as you do - if you're willing to let go of your illusions of lack, IMO

This is it!
There are no hidden meanings.
You canít get there from here and besides thereís no place else to go.
We are all already dying and we will be dead for a long time.
Nothing lasts.
There is no way of getting all you want.
You canít have anything unless you let go of it.
You only get to keep what you give away.
There is no particular reason why you lost out on some things.
The world is not necessarily just. Being good often does not pay off and there is no compensation for misfortune.
You have a responsibility to do your best nonetheless.
It is a random universe to which we bring meaning.
You donít really control anything.
You canít make anyone love you.
No one is any stronger or any weaker than anyone else.
Everyone is, in his own way, vulnerable.
There are no great men.
If you have a hero look again: you have diminished yourself in some way.
Everyone lies, cheats, pretends (yes, you too, and most certainly I myself).
All evil is potential vitality in need of transformation.
All of you is worth something if you will only own it.
Progress is an illusion.
It can be displaced but never eradicated, as solutions breed new problems.
Yet it to necessary to keep on struggling toward solution.
Childhood is a nightmare.
But it is so very hard to be an on-your-own, take-care-of-yourself-cause-there-is-no-one-else-to-do-it-for-you grown-up.
Each of us is ultimately alone.
The most important things, each man must do for himself.
Love is not enough but it sure helps.
We have only ourselves, and one another. That may not be much, but thatís all there is.
How strange that so often it all seems worth it.
We must live within the ambiguity of partial freedom, partial power, and partial knowledge.
All important decisions must be made on the basis of insufficient data.
Yet we are responsible for everything we do.
No excuses will be accepted.
You can run, but you canít hide.
It is most important to run out of scapegoats.
We must learn the power of living with our helplessness.
The only victory lies in surrender to oneself.
All significant battles are fought within oneself.
You are free to do whatever you like. You need only face the consequences.
What at do you know Ö for sure Ö anyway?
Learn to forgive yourself, again and again and again and again

peripatetic
05-04-13, 12:56 AM
i haven't read this book, though i did google it and saw some reviews/synopses, but it's always great to see someone find something that works for them in coping with life experiences and having adhd. it's always interesting to hear people describe how something plays a role in their own lives given the rich variety of individual journeys i've seen described/reported as being personally useful over the years. best wishes that your success continues. x

Blanched Dubois
05-04-13, 07:58 AM
i haven't read this book, though i did google it and saw some reviews/synopses, but it's always great to see someone find something that works for them in coping with life experiences and having adhd. it's always interesting to hear people describe how something plays a role in their own lives given the rich variety of individual journeys i've seen described/reported as being personally useful over the years. best wishes that your success continues. x

thanks - when i could read i read alot...music led me - and poets...philosophers...as damaged as i was the part of me that remained untouched is what made me

i'm for the first time ever publically saying anything...and i know why...now

that book was pivotal, so was The Outsider by Colin Wilson, and The Denial of Death by Ernst Becker