View Full Version : Student's In-Class Rant to Teacher - Justified or Out of Line?


Bazinga
05-09-13, 12:12 PM
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http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/Duncanville-students-classroom-rant-goes-viral-206701581.html
...Bliss told News 8 the situation began when he questioned the teacher about why students did not have more time to prepare for the STAAR test. But he said the conversation escalated after the teacher told him to stop complaining. After a brief verbal exchange, Bliss said the teacher told him to leave her class. That's when a classmate begins recording the video that has gone viral.

In it, Bliss unloads on his instructor's teaching style — specifically critical of her passing out worksheets rather than creating lively and engaging discussions.

...

The 18-year-old is currently a sophomore because he dropped out of school for a year. Only then did he discover the value of education.
"What I soon realized is without that education I'm not going to make any steps forward into my future," he said.

Bliss said he didn't know a classmate recorded his rant, but he's not embarrassed about what he said.

He said the school's principal requested a meeting with him on Thursday to discuss what happened. Bliss said so far he has not been reprimanded.
Thoughts?

TygerSan
05-09-13, 12:41 PM
As a spouse of a teacher and someone who's taught college classes on occasion, I have to say that there's always more context than the video clip provides. That makes it much harder to pass judgment on the teacher in question.

In my classes, I've noticed a real sense of entitlement, like I'm supposed to be a singing dancing clown sent to entertain them. . . sorry, sometimes I simply either don't have time to make something super interesting, or the subject itself is not inherently interesting. Sometimes it really comes down to hard work and practice.

What the kid actually says: yeah, that would make a better teacher/learning environment. But that said, how much say does the teacher have over how she prepares the students for the test? Probably not much (she may even *have* to provide the packets that they were working on, in accordance with the curriculum. She may be just as hamstrung as the student feels).

As an aside, it really kind of ticks me off that now a kid can push and push and push and push a teacher, and then when the teacher *finally* reacts --after all they are only human beings as well -- that student or a fellow class mate can record the aftermath of a teacher losing his/her shyte and make it go viral. Again, there's context, and there's always two sides to the story. The soundbite, unfortunately, makes for the juicier story and the better outrage than the truth sometimes.

midnightstar
05-09-13, 12:52 PM
There's two sides to every story ........

Bazinga
05-09-13, 01:01 PM
Tyger, that's understandable and generally I would agree with you. Like you said, there are always two sides to a story and as of yet, we don't know hers.

We do know that the video has already caught the attention of the school district and they are investigating the situation, whatever that means. We also know that, as of this posting, the student has yet to be reprimanded. Of course this does not mean that they stand with him, nor does it mean they stand against him, BUT it is a clear indication that they are trying to handle the situation without overreacting towards the teacher or the student, and for that they should be commended.

What irks me is the teachers perceived attitude, her tone of voice, and her one/two word responses to him: "Bye", "Get out", and the like. Maybe she was trying to restrain herself by not engaging him (and if that's the case, then she deserves a little bit of credit), but it makes her sound like she has no f**ks left to give...like she really doesn't care...it makes her sound arrogant and lazy. Whether this is true or not is yet to be determined.

I understand that if she had said much more than she did, it would have only provoked him further, but it's her tone of voice and attitude in response to him that makes me feel that he was all the more justified to speak his mind.

As far as the overwhelming "sense of entitlement" goes, I completely agree with you that it is getting out of hand in all areas, not just specific to education. While I'm aware that you made no such implication, I don't get the impression that Jeff has a sense of entitlement based on all that I've read regarding this story...

Bazinga
05-09-13, 02:02 PM
http://thescoopblog.dallasnews.com/2013/05/duncanville-high-school-student-lecturing-his-history-teacher-in-the-classroom-goes-viral.html/

Updated at 11:50:
Jeff Weiss over on the Education blog (http://educationblog.dallasnews.com/2013/05/no-disciplinary-action-against-duncanville-student-whose-video-went-viral.html/) reports that Bliss has met with the principal at Duncanville High and won’t face any discipline.
“The principal and student visited this morning,” according to a statement from the district, “and no further action will be taken regarding the student.”

TygerSan
05-09-13, 02:18 PM
What irks me is the teachers perceived attitude, her tone of voice, and her one/two word responses to him: "Bye", "Get out", and the like. Maybe she was trying to restrain herself by not engaging him (and if that's the case, then she deserves a little bit of credit), but it makes her sound like she has no f**ks left to give...like she really doesn't care...it makes her sound arrogant and lazy. Whether this is true or not is yet to be determined.

Yeah, I get what you're saying, but who knows what happened in the lead-up (not saying there aren't crappy teachers and fully admit that in this video, she appears to be one of them).

If she *had* responded more forcefully, maybe his reaction would've remained the same, maybe not. My cynical opinion is that the video would've gone viral in a different way (teacher verbally abuses child!). My spouse isn't allowed to even *photograph* a child without permission . . . yet the kids upload vids to you-tube the minute they shoot them.

"No further action will be taken with this student" I think means "we can't discuss disciplinary actions with the press" . . . (at least I would hope they wouldn't be able to).

Bazinga
05-09-13, 02:39 PM
Yeah, I get what you're saying, but who knows what happened in the lead-up (not saying there aren't crappy teachers and fully admit that in this video, she appears to be one of them). ^Agreed. This recording could have begun at a very opportune moment for the student and, as a result, a very unfortunate moment for the teacher. The point at which it begins should, by no means, indicate full innocence of either party.

If she *had* responded more forcefully, maybe his reaction would've remained the same, maybe not. My cynical opinion is that the video would've gone viral in a different way (teacher verbally abuses child!).^Very valid point here...our response and opinion to the situation would be completely different...

My spouse isn't allowed to even *photograph* a child without permission . . . yet the kids upload vids to you-tube the minute they shoot them.^This is another thread in and of itself, but you are right, there's a startling indication of a very rampant double standard. However, without the video it would have just been his word against hers, and who would you be more likely to believe in that case?

"No further action will be taken with this student" I think means "we can't discuss disciplinary actions with the press" . . . (at least I would hope they wouldn't be able to).^True, but it could also mean that this was the "straw that broke the camel's back" for them regarding the teacher. Maybe the teacher was already on thin ice and this video was the proof the administration needed to back up previous complaints on her thereby justifying "no further action" towards the student. Speculation can offer many different end results...