View Full Version : What do you get out of drinking Alcohol?


Fraser_0762
05-16-13, 11:19 AM
One thing that i've never really understood, is how somebody can become addicted to alcohol.

To me, alcohol is something that makes me feel even more depressed and extremely dizzy/sick, even if I don't consume a huge amount.

Although I have a drink every now and then, just to "fit in" as it were, I could never really vision myself being hooked on the stuff, as I see very little benefit from alcohol consumption.

So I have to ask the question to any current or ex alcoholics. How do you actually become addicted to this stuff? :confused:

What's its appeal that managed to keep it's grip on you?

janiew
05-16-13, 01:19 PM
I don't know that I'm an alcoholic but I used alcohol regularly to counteract anxiety and perhaps ADD. Then six months ago my doctor put me on a beta blocker for migraine prevention which helps immensely with physical anxiety symptoms. I lost the desire to drink.

ana futura
05-16-13, 02:13 PM
I'm not an alcoholic, but I do like to have a drink or two on occasion. I really like the taste of beer and high end spirits. I can't understand people who drink bad tastless beer or mix coke with vodka and down it- that's gross to me.

I used to have an issue with binge drinking when I was younger. I was still learning how to drink then, and I would frequently go past my limit. Once I hit a certain level of intoxication I couldn't stop myself from drinking everything in sight. It took a few times, but I eventually learned what my limits where and how to avoid getting trashed, as I hate being really drunk or hungover.

I do like a mild buzz every once in a while though. It makes me giddy and happy. Also if I'm somewhere with loud noises like a restaurant, having a beer will calm my sensory issues. I am much more tolerant of annoying situations or people if I have had a drink. I normally don't care for interacting with other humans that much. One drink tends to make me more social and makes human interaction easier.

I have recently started meditating, and I have found that I am drinking far less than I used to. It's not that I've made a conscious decision to not drink, I just don't see the need to do it. The buzzed state I used to find enjoyable actually seems less enjoyable now. I still drink at loud restaurants or if I have to hang out with someone who annoys me- drinking is the only way to make that tolerable.

Prior to meditation, if life wasn't going my way I would notice the urge to drink pop up more and more- it was my way of tolerating the intolerable. I'm pretty disciplined with everything I put into my body, so I never let it get to the point where I actually experienced chemical addiction, but I did notice myself having thoughts like "gee, I really could use a beer now". I think addiction happens when you don't question those thoughts and give into them. It's a slow escalation.

Bazinga
05-16-13, 02:47 PM
I'm not an alcoholic, but I do like to have a drink or two on occasion. I really like the taste of beer and high end spirits. I can't understand people who drink bad tastless beer or mix coke with vodka and down it- that's gross to me.

I used to have an issue with binge drinking when I was younger. I was still learning how to drink then, and I would frequently go past my limit. Once I hit a certain level of intoxication I couldn't stop myself from drinking everything in sight. It took a few times, but I eventually learned what my limits where and how to avoid getting trashed, as I hate being really drunk or hungover. I can relate with the above quite well. In the last 6 years I've maybe had less than 5 drinks, so it's been a while since I've been even mildly buzzed. When I was a drinker, I wasn't an alcoholic, but I went through a period where I did drink heavily for a consistent period of time, especially when I was a server at a restaraunt and the only friends I had were my coworkers. We all would go out drinking when we weren't working, so it was a social thing (along with smoking). I also don't understand the appeal of cheap beer or using coke as a mixer. I had a horrible rum and coke once and it put me off of those kind of drinks for good.


I do like a mild buzz every once in a while though. It makes me giddy and happy. Also if I'm somewhere with loud noises like a restaurant, having a beer will calm my sensory issues. I am much more tolerant of annoying situations or people if I have had a drink. I normally don't care for interacting with other humans that much. One drink tends to make me more social and makes human interaction easier. This sounds a lot like me, although my mood and tolerance levels depended greatly on what I was drinking. Certain types of alcohol had distinctly different effects on me: beers and cider (which I loved) made me calm but more sociable than normal, tequila (my favorite liquor) made me overly flirtatious yet very relaxed and carefree, whiskey and vodka made me want to just vent all my anger and frustration (I rarely ever drank them as a result), never really touched much of anything else. I liked being buzzed, but there was a very clear point where I knew that if I kept on it would quickly lead to me becoming a different person all together.

If I drank to "get anything" out of it, it was to be more relaxed, carefree, and social within my group of friends.

I have recently started meditating, and I have found that I am drinking far less than I used to. It's not that I've made a conscious decision to not drink, I just don't see the need to do it. The buzzed state I used to find enjoyable actually seems less enjoyable now. I still drink at loud restaurants or if I have to hang out with someone who annoys me- drinking is the only way to make that tolerable.

I'm pretty disciplined with everything I put into my body, so I never let it get to the point where I actually experienced chemical addiction, but I did notice myself having thoughts like "gee, I really could use a beer now". I think addiction happens when you don't question those thoughts and give into them. It's a slow escalation. Same here. I completely agree.

Botje
05-16-13, 03:47 PM
I like to drink a beer after a day of hard work (mental or physical). Just takes the edge off everything when i am in a good mood. Feeling a little buzzed and more relaxed. Sometimes i take a beer for late night desk work, just to get my mind a bit more clear. I try not to drink when i am in a bad mood, maybe sometimes to relax a bit.

With friends i do enjoy to drink enough to get quite drunk but not too much. I hate it to have a hangover and i always want to be able to recall what i did when drunk. Makes me a bit more social and loose, less serious.

Quantity: after a day of hard work (weekend), 1 bottle, sometimes 2. When going out, anything from 2 to 12 glasses of beer? Not that that happens more than once every 2-4 months or so. I try to take good care of my health so i rarely drink large quantities (although 12 glasses of beer is already a lot).

emily848
05-16-13, 04:14 PM
My wife is an alcoholic; I attended seven family education days while she was in rehab. I've also gone with her to many AA meetings. Most people take awhile to develop alcoholism. A lot of times drinking starts out as a way to hide. To hide from one's own anxiety or inadequacies, to hide from painful past memories. Sometimes it may start as something done socially just to loosen up and have fun.

When someone becomes an alcoholic, the alcohol changes the way that their brain works so that drinking (or another addictive substance) replaces the instinct for survival. Despite all evidence pointing to the fact that the addiction is taking away the person's health and livelihood, deep down in their gut and psyche they feel that their life depends on consuming the addictive substance.

It doesn't start out that way, but once the change has taken place it is EXTREMELY difficult to quit drinking. Someone may hate themselves for drinking, and may not even enjoy it anymore, but still can't stop doing it.

It doesn't matter that it's hurting their loved ones and themselves, they'll process that information by thinking "I'm a terrible person, I might as well just give in to my addiction."

The night my wife hit bottom, her friend brought her home after 1am unable to walk. She woke me up after she'd been calling for help for awhile. She was on her elbows and knees with her face in the carpet and I was honestly afraid she would look up and have the face of a monster. It felt like a nightmare. She was asking for my help to get her to the bathroom. I couldn't help her go to the bathroom and I can't help her quit drinking. It felt very representative of alcoholism in general.

I felt that night like she was possessed by a demon that was forcing her to repeatedly stab herself & me while all the time she was begging me to help her stop.

That was last November, the night before her second stay in rehab. She was clean for 79 days after getting out of rehab that time, but relapsed last January and has been struggling ever since then, not going more than a few days without a drink.

I've never liked the taste of alcohol, but used to drink occasionally as a way to have fun in the present moment. Since I've started meditation, that doesn't even make sense to me, but I can't think of another way to describe it. I guess to be able to not worry about consequences or about other, more worthwhile, things I should be doing. To feel like watching a movie and eating junk food was the most fulfilling thing I could possibly do. Or to feel like I was REALLY CONNECTING with the people I was with even though I wasn't.

Because alcohol is so distasteful to me, I could never be an alcoholic, and I'm thankful for that. I have a huge amount of sympathy for all of the lives that are affected by alcoholism. Because of what I've seen of alcoholism, I really think that it's not good for anyone, even though some people can control it. Both of my parents drink daily without getting drunk and without it seeming to affect their lives.

A book I read called "Natural Highs: Supplements, Nutriton, and Mind-Body Techniques to Help you Feel Good All the Time," talks about how addictive substances are often used as a substitute for feeling a spiritual connectedness. They talked about that in the Family Education sessions at Rehab also; it is part of the reason that finding strength in a higher power is such an important part of the 12-steps.

Fraser_0762
05-16-13, 07:51 PM
I don't know that I'm an alcoholic but I used alcohol regularly to counteract anxiety and perhaps ADD. Then six months ago my doctor put me on a beta blocker for migraine prevention which helps immensely with physical anxiety symptoms. I lost the desire to drink.

But alcohol doesn't counteract ADD symptoms, it only makes them worse.

The same goes to those who smoke weed to "treat" their ADD symptoms.

It's completely counter productive.

ana futura
05-16-13, 08:03 PM
But alcohol doesn't counteract ADD symptoms, it only makes them worse.

The same goes to those who smoke weed to "treat" their ADD symptoms.

It's completely counter productive.

I find one beer actually makes me less distractable. I'm always better at things that require concentration (but not thought) after one beer. Things like darts and bowling. I think it's just having a little hint of dopamine, it cuts out distractions. Once you miss the sweet spot it makes everything worse, but it seems to affect the "fun" ADHD symptoms the most. I get so hyper when I'm drunk, that I really don't care that I have zero impulse control.

Also alcohol does cut down on anxiety dramatically, and personally as an anxious person with ADHD I can barely tell where the anxiety ends and the ADHD begins.

When I was taking amphetamine medication I found myself drinking everyday, as alcohol if timed right did a great job of easing my rebound symptoms. I eventually figured out this meant amphetamines were simply not for me.

My uncle managed his ADHD with weed his whole life, it seemed to work well for him. Does not work for me at all, as it escalates my anxiety so much.

Neither is a practical treatment, but if you aren't diagnosed or simply can't get other factors in your life to come together, I can see how they both wind up getting used as self-medication. At they very least, they both make you not give a crap about how messed up your life is thanks to ADHD.

ADHD is about far more than just functionality and economic well-being.

Darksanity
05-17-13, 01:11 AM
One thing that i've never really understood, is how somebody can become addicted to alcohol.

To me, alcohol is something that makes me feel even more depressed and extremely dizzy/sick, even if I don't consume a huge amount.

What's its appeal that managed to keep it's grip on you?
I love alcohol. :D Out of all drugs I've tried it's one of the best lol. I'm not an alcoholic but sure as hell came close in the past. It gives me confidence, kills anxiety, makes me a smooth-talker, kills pain, actually gives me energy, etc. Often times I would down 3 beers or so before dates.

When I say alcohol I mean beer btw. Hard liquor, and "drinks" make me sick.

GHB is even better though, but that's controversial. :rolleyes:

fracturedstory
05-17-13, 04:18 AM
Calms the nerves, with more you get drunker and I became a very chatty person. There is a kind of high with it to me.

If it tasted bad I wouldn't drink it. I go through phases of liking one beer over the others.

Alcohol doesn't counteract ADHD but everyone who is drunk is impulsive, slurry, forgetful so it becomes less of a problem.

I have autism so if I ever want to talk to people when I'm out a few drinks helps. I enjoy it too. I enjoy the social aspects of it. When I go to gigs I probably only have between 2-4 beers. 4 would be more like 8 to a person who isn't as sensitive to it as me so I rarely drink that much.

sarahsweets
05-17-13, 04:28 AM
For me, I enjoyed drinking for years. I was happy chatty, high etc. I never drank a whole lot but I did get drunk, alcohol was never a problem for me. About 4 years ago, Im not sure why I started drinking everyday. I required more and more to get that same buzz even though I really wasnt getting the buzz I wanted. It started as more of a learned behavior at first. I would make a drink and chat with a friend for hours. Then I made drinks and didnt chat with her, then I didnt have her as a friend at all and the drinking was still a problem. If I could drink safely and not have the equivalent of a physical allergy to alcohol I would . After a lifetime of mild drinking i became an alcoholic in 6 months 4 years ago. Its like a switch was turned on in me and I have no idea why. Thankfully I am clean now but it was by the skin of my teeth.

Raye
05-17-13, 08:14 AM
I never understood how anyone can get addicted to painkillers and alcohol, yet I got addicted to benzos.

There are people who don't understand how someone can get addicted to benzos yet can get addicted to alcohol.

I don't like the taste or smell of alcohol, so I don't drink. I'm 33 and can count the number of times I've been drunk in my entire life on one hand.

ana futura
05-17-13, 12:19 PM
Yeah, everyone has the "thing" that they respond to. I HATE painkillers, I don't understand them at all, they just make me feel sluggish and crappy. I also don't understand how people get addicted to stimulants, they're so boring and "practical". Same for coke, what a boring drug. But alcohol has always felt fun.

Yet tons of people are addicted to painkillers and coke, so they must be getting something out of it. And then there are the people who get sad and depressed when they drink. I've never gotten depressed or sad when drunk, not once. It always makes me giddy. Back when I would binge drink, I would just get more and more hyper and silly until I passed out.

Fuzzy12
05-17-13, 12:51 PM
It's soothing. As a teenager, I used to drink to lose my inhibitions. Later, when the depression hit, I drank to make myself feel better. For me, it calms my thoughts. Or maybe it just kills my thoughts. You can't think very well, when you are drunk. It feels as if it gets rid of the mess in my head. It allows me to forget.

I also used to drink too much in social occasions. Not anymore to lose my inhibitions but just to combat the boredom. Whenever we did anything fun with our friends, like playing games or going for a walk, I wouldn't need alcohol. But otherwise, when the main entertainment was chatting with others, I had to drink to cope with the boredom.

Before I started taking anti depressants, I drank way too much. Now anti depressants and cigarettes are doing the same job. A better job. Now I hardly ever crave a drink but whenever I stop smoking, the urge to drink returns. I guess, I need something to soothe my brain.

Nate W
05-18-13, 08:57 PM
One thing that i've never really understood, is how somebody can become addicted to alcohol.

To me, alcohol is something that makes me feel even more depressed and extremely dizzy/sick, even if I don't consume a huge amount.

Although I have a drink every now and then, just to "fit in" as it were, I could never really vision myself being hooked on the stuff, as I see very little benefit from alcohol consumption.

So I have to ask the question to any current or ex alcoholics. How do you actually become addicted to this stuff? :confused:

What's its appeal that managed to keep it's grip on you?That is an excellent question. I'm alcoholic and feel qualified to answer. Eight years sober, by the way, though AA.

Alcohol does produces an effect very different (and very positive) in the alcoholic than it does in what we alcoholics call the normal, temperate, drinker. You described the "normal" drinker perfectly by stating your response to alcohol. Sometimes we also hear that one drink is plenty to give non-alcoholics a way to unwind on an occasional basis. And/or they like the taste. Although I did like the taste of beer (I was a beer drinker) I drank for the effect. My response was completely different from my first drink, before I lost control. But from that very day I was destined to become an alcoholic.

Alcohol for me, when I first drank at 14 (only had a couple of beers), gave me this sense of exhilaration and calmness at the same time, relieved my boredom, and made everything in the world seem perfect and interesting. It silenced all the racing thoughts in my head. I hadn't a care in the world. It was my elixir of life, as I called it. From 5that day on I longed for that feeling. I needed to feel it as often as possible because up to that point, I felt pretty bad (bored to death, unhappy, nothing interested me. Everything (or most things) became interesting when I drank.

I (like most other alcoholics) drank to recapture that first experience, as well. Although for years, drinking was always fun, it was never quite as special as the first time. It became my norm. By 35 years old, I considered downing a 12-pack several times a week normal. It is what I did. It was my hobby.

I never drank to get smashed. I just drank to have a nice buzz all the time. You can drink a lot too that way. At the end, when alcohol no longer gave me a lift, I drank about 15 beers a day. Every day. New years eve? I drank just as I did the day before--A lot! I drank when happy and when sad, I just drank. Heck, the sun came up, "I'll drink to that". Hey the sun went down..., I drank to that too.

We alcoholics also have what we call the obsession of the mind. When we are not drinking, we are thinking about drinking. 24/7, unless we are drunk or asleep. We romance about it, and when we do, it gives us this giddy satisfaction, especially when we know we are soon going to drink again. This feeling is akin to someone finding out they just won a big sum of money playing the lottery. It's a feeling like that.

People with ADHD are much more susceptible to alcoholism because alcohol triggers the reward center (increases dopamine), but more quickly than ADHD medication (stimulants) taken properly. It is theorized people with ADHD either have low dopamine, or the dopamine does not trigger the reward center in the brain in a proper manner. I am positive I drank to self medicate my ADHD. I only began ADHD medication at 50 years old. That is when I realized why I drank.

Oh in the end, alcohol decimated me, physically, mentally, and spiritually. I lost just about all I had. Even after going though all the loss, my mind told me it was still alright to drink. We alcoholics call this insane thinking. Another trait of the alcoholic. Simply means our thinking is not whole, in light of the circumstances. But the good news is I got back all the things I lost, and then some, through working the 12 Steps. I am truly blessed today.

Also, there is no such thing as an ex alcoholic. Once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic. Even if one no longer drinks (like me), they are still alcoholic. If for some reason my mind told me it was alright to drink (could well happen if I quit AA) and if I did drink one beer, the obsession of the mind would take hold, as would the compulsion to drink. I'd "be off to the races" again, as we say in AA.

--Nate

Nate W
05-18-13, 09:11 PM
Ana futura said, "I find one beer actually makes me less distractable. I'm always better at things that require concentration (but not thought) after one beer. Things like darts and bowling. I think it's just having a little hint of dopamine, it cuts out distractions. Once you miss the sweet spot it makes everything worse, but it seems to affect the "fun" ADHD symptoms the most. I get so hyper when I'm drunk, that I really don't care that I have zero impulse control.

Also alcohol does cut down on anxiety dramatically, and personally as an anxious person with ADHD I can barely tell where the anxiety ends and the ADHD begins."

Ana hit the nail right on the head. Us folks with ADHD have to be cautious as far as alcohol is concerned.

--Nate

janiew
05-18-13, 09:12 PM
But alcohol doesn't counteract ADD symptoms, it only makes them worse.

The same goes to those who smoke weed to "treat" their ADD symptoms.

It's completely counter productive.

I agree with Ana Futura that when you have ADHD and anxiety, it is hard to tell where one starts and the other ends. Alcohol can sooth anxiety. That's why since I started the beta blocker, which melts physical anxiety, I haven't had the desire to drink.

Weed makes my anxiety worse.

Fraser_0762
05-18-13, 10:55 PM
Hey, thanks for the replies guys.

I have a confession, I'm not an alcoholic. However, for about 8 years running now, I've had an addiction to gambling.

It's interesting to read some of the posts on here about the feeling that you're "gaining" something in the short run, even although you're losing the battle in the long run.

I experience the exact same thing. Even although I know I'm going to lose more and more in the long run, I do it for the "quick fix".

1Buster
05-18-13, 11:00 PM
Got tired of reading so sorry if I repeat other posts. Am I an alcoholic? - probably. Sure as hell need to slow it down. In my 40s and know some s***, so some points:

- Alcohol does counteract ADHD symptoms (at first). Alcohol starts as a stimulant (probably - look it up!) It certainly does with me. I focus better on what I'm doing and complete tasks, until I get too drunk or tired to care.
- Not to mention self-medicating anxiety, depression, etc. - whether or now we know we have them. I didn't until last Fall.
- I feel I continue to drink now, almost nightly, in the face of all it's negative consequences, to relieve the extreme boredom and stress (yes! boredom and stress at the same time!) I feel in dealing with nightly family responsibilities.
- We're also predisposed to become alcoholics - my mom was an alcoholic.
- Oh yeah, alcohol releases dopamine! Mmmm... dopamine. (Not to mention we get a dopamine boost just anticipating drinking later. Oh yeah, that's f'd up! Thanks, brain!)

Know what? I'm going to stop. I keep scrolling up to Nate's post and seeing he's already got it all right. Nate and I are a little different in how I feel/he felt, but not much. I'm going to try to remember to re-read Nate's post tomorrow and use it to take a night off. Thanks, Nate!!!

Fraser_0762
05-18-13, 11:13 PM
That's interesting.

1 Bottle - I feel slightly more hazy than usual.

2 Bottles - I feel even more hazy.

4 Bottles - I get a mild feeling of pressure in my head.

8 Bottles - I get severe pressure in my head and my stomach feels bloated.

12 Bottles - I feel extreme dizziness and I can't stomach anymore of it either.


I just don't get any enjoyment out of alcohol at all most of the time.

1Buster
05-18-13, 11:14 PM
When I first saw Fraser's thread, I thought I'd respond with something about a na´ve question, etc., etc., blah, blah, blah ...

Instead, I thank you for starting something that I've found very helpful from all the posts from folks who've dealt with this, as I am dealing with this along with mood disorders I didn't know I had 6 mos. ago (but have had a long time).

Fraser_0762
05-18-13, 11:16 PM
Well you know what they say...

There's no such thing as a stupid question, as you may just learn something new. :)

Rebelyell
05-18-13, 11:38 PM
Usually a buzz following the turrlett bowl followed by a mean as hell hang over

TygerSan
05-23-13, 10:47 AM
Why do I drink? I like the taste of beer, wine & single malt scotch. It's fun to learn about the different flavors involved in making good alcohol. If I didn't like the taste, I wouldn't drink.

I totally understand where you're coming from, Fraser. I've tried the drinking as self-medication thing, esp. for anxiety. It just doesn't work long-term for *me*. I can't imagine feeling that crappy all the time (hangover/no good sleep/etc).

And that's just it, I love the taste, and while it tends to mellow me out to begin with, when the buzz wears off, I can get anxious, depressed and irritable as all get out, so I *can't* over-do it.

As an aside, somehow I have a super-human ability to appear relatively sober even when I'm incredibly drunk. . . that's gotten me in trouble before. Fortunately, I also seem to be able to say *no* and know when enough is enough, again, even when very drunk.

On the other hand, give me a stupid video game, and I will sit and play it for 12 hrs straight, get really peeved at the stupid thing, to the point of throwing a full-on tantrum, and *still* keep compulsively playing till I've beaten the thing, even if I *hate* the game.

Finally:

- Alcohol does counteract ADHD symptoms (at first). Alcohol starts as a stimulant (probably - look it up!) It certainly does with me. I focus better on what I'm doing and complete tasks, until I get too drunk or tired to care.

Actually, it doesn't really act as a stimulant, one of the first things it does is depress the activity in the prefrontal cortex (which is what's kinda impaired in ADHD anyways), which removes inhibitions, which gives a sense of exhilaration/high/disinhibition that certainly *feels* like a stimulant.

dresser
06-01-13, 01:57 PM
I got a few yr sober N the first thing is that beer commercials are absolutely correct
having a bud light in one hand while holding toilet paper in the other (sitting down of course) even makes that exercise better and ADDs the finishing touches lololo. I never liked the taste of any kind of Alcohol I lied to me about that, found out later that what it could do for me was more important :I could feel O.k. about being me, I could get a feeling of being accepted-- the back of my mind said I wasn't, I could look you in the eye, I could talk to anyone, I could do things, I could dance (loved dancing) My first sober dance STAR WARS saw me N created R2D2. or close out stuff to feel good
about me. AND that was/is the Hook. basikly we are all good people why would/should I feel I needed booze- meds - drugs or even a video game to alter my life . those answers are what I'm seeking I have found some and do they ever feel good N they are here to stay. this is funny, I'v dealt with booze all my life (71) in one form or another N never used the word ALCOHOL when writing or even verbalizing I
was never sure of how to spell the !%#&(#$ word. this is from my acttualitys

CthulhuMinion
06-01-13, 06:02 PM
I'm the same way as you, OP. I hate substances that take away control (except for psychedelics, which are much safer than alcohol).

I just get overcome by this gross feeling when I start getting buzzed on booze. I get really dehydrated, uncomfortable and unfamiliar with how to drive a human body. I don't really stumble around, I just sit there because my body feels awkward to control.

I used to not be this way. I drank like crazy in highschool, but once I hit about 24 or 25 my body was just like "nope, don't want this stuff bro."

Same thing with marijuana actually(legal for recreational use here). My wife always asks me to have a drink or smoke a joint with her. I'm always like "If I want to feel disoriented and awkward I'll get a concussion."

I only use therapeutic or mind expanding drugs. Plain and simple.

josh989
06-01-13, 06:49 PM
^ I get the same thing on certain substances. This is why I don't smoke weed or do any psychedelics anymore, and probably never will again. Not something that brings me any pleasure. I'm 22 years old, so when I tell people my age I don't LIKE to get high they think I'm crazy. My GF is a medical marijuana patient (unlike kids who use the licence to get high, this is actual medicine for her) so I'm surrounded by it all the time.

Not an alcoholic but I do enjoy drinking. I drink at least once a week, and get drunk a few times a year. I really enjoy the taste of beer and wine, but hate the taste of hard liquors... although I don't mind whiskey. Drinking to me is only really fun or worth it if you don't go over board. I don't enjoy being drunk, but I like being moderately buzzed. For me that means 3-5 beers. Lowers anxiety, increases sociability, and a nice mood lift; it's no wonder it's so widely used in social settings. In moderation it's great, but the negative effects quickly outweigh the positive if you drink too much. Lots of people my age seem to think going out and having drinks means seeing who can get drunk the fastest.

The reason there are so many alcoholics is probably because alcohol is the easiest to get and most socially acceptable drug in our society, although marijuana is closing that gap and will probably surpass it in the next 50 years. Since alcohol doesn't have the same stigma surrounding it as many other drugs, it's easier to let it get out of hand before you spot you/someone else may have a problem. I know plenty of people who abuse alcohol profusely and will turn around, climb on their horse, and stick their nose up at people who use illicit drugs; even if they do so responsibly.

CthulhuMinion
06-01-13, 07:08 PM
Some people just aren't compatible with cannabis. Too me, it's more uncomfortable than having the flu. My heart rate goes through the roof, and then it goes even higher when I start getting paranoid about it being too high haha.

Alcohol and weed combined is even worse. Dizziness and projectile vomiting are sure to follow for me.

Now I'm just getting way off topic.

Anyway, there is enough scientific and personal evidence that alcohol is one of the most detrimental substances in the world, even compared to illegal street drugs.

Alcohol won't make you lose teeth or get infected veins, but it tends to bring out the worst in (some) people. It causes stupid, irreversible decisions to be made, fatal car accidents, domestic violence, total loss of control, tears families apart and destroys the liver. Withdrawal from alcohol is rivaled only by benzo withdrawal. Both can kill you. Even heroin withdrawal isn't fatal. Bottom line is, lobbyists have too much money invested in the alcohol market to let other (usually safer) drugs compete outside of the black market.

Oh, and I can't stand being around sloppy drunks. I can't even stand being around my own wife when she is drunk. I'm not judging anyone or saying it should be illegal (I'm against ALL prohibition). I'm just saying that these are some of the reasons why I don't really drink. I might have a beer or a glass of wine with dinner once in a blue moon, but I never drink to get wasted.

End of self righteous rant.

Flory
06-01-13, 07:24 PM
I can take or leave booze actually think most of it tastes like sh*t and is expensive, however if I'm out drinking I do binge drink and I'm an assh0le to be around because I'm either mad hyper and playful or I topple a little bit over that line (especially if I'm drinking something like snakebite) to the point where I become a bit fighty :| so mostly I don't drink and I think it tastes like a55

josh989
06-01-13, 07:37 PM
^ Minion, haha you sound 100% like me. I get so much anxiety when I smoke weed it's crazy. Pulse starts to sky rocket and I become ultra-aware of my breathing and heart rate. I focus on it and that just makes me feel more anxious. A vicious never-ending cycle lol.

I combined alcohol and weed a few times. Same exact feeling. Best way to describe it is feeling like you're drunk on a boat. Not fun!

Yeah I'd list alcohol in the top 5 most dangeroud drugs overall, but I'd argue the stats are so high for alcohol because it's so widely used, socially exceptable, and available. It's not nearly as addictive as other drugs, but definately wreaks havoc on your body. Heroin, crack, and meth in my opinion are far worse and much easier to get addicted to than alcohol. The main part that plays into that is the fact that people are forced to get these drugs on the street. They get dirty drugs and inject/use in unsanitary ways which creates even more problems for them.

CthulhuMinion
06-01-13, 07:55 PM
^ Precisely. I'm not arguing that alcohol is anywhere near as addictive as methamphetamine. How people balance the negative effects is gonna be based on their opinion. However, if you do get addicted to alcohol and decide to quit, it's tricky because the withdrawal can cause fatal seizures. If you quit methamphetamine, while it is still an incredibly difficult task, it can not possibly be fatal.

DcGonzo
06-01-13, 07:57 PM
I just saw a science talk where I cannot remember the specifics but it was something along the lines that moderate amounts of alcohol were shown to have positive adaptive response to the epigenome of mice, and that this potentially this could also apply to the human epigenome...

fracturedstory
06-12-13, 08:37 AM
I sometimes wonder how people in the music scene can drink so much alcohol and even take swigs out of a bottle of red wine on stage, and still not become an alcoholic. Some people do and are even doing hard drugs. I just don't know how I could survive being surrounded by that.
I'm hardly surviving as one who just attends these gigs. The last time I was sober at a gig was in January. And I've been to a few gigs since then. But 5 beers is a lot to me and sometimes I don't have more than 2. Lightweight I am. After about 5 glasses of red I'm ready to pass out. I suppose it's a good thing. I don't get ridiculously drunk and I don't tend to enjoy hangovers so there's a significant break between my next drink.

Fraser_0762
06-12-13, 08:42 AM
I sometimes wonder how people in the music scene can drink so much alcohol and even take swigs out of a bottle of red wine on stage, and still not become an alcoholic. Some people do and are even doing hard drugs. I just don't know how I could survive being surrounded by that.
I'm hardly surviving as one who just attends these gigs. The last time I was sober at a gig was in January. And I've been to a few gigs since then. But 5 beers is a lot to me and sometimes I don't have more than 2. Lightweight I am. After about 5 glasses of red I'm ready to pass out. I suppose it's a good thing. I don't get ridiculously drunk and I don't tend to enjoy hangovers so there's a significant break between my next drink.

I don't drink huge amounts either. I just can't seem to stomach too much alcohol. I get physically sick long before I can actually get drunk.

These famous people who get drunk and take drugs go down that route because their career is taking a toll on them. They're trying to take on far more than they can physically and mentally handle.

Far too much pressure is put on famous people these days to handle more and more in a shorter time scale.

Hayden_NZ
06-12-13, 10:21 PM
Because I have been a "little bit different" through out my life, (with ADHD, and a bit quirky), I have meet some interesting people. Some of these interesting people have had mental health issues. What I have found is that people often self medicate with sustances in an attempt to even themselves out/feel "normal". I can really understand why people would do this. I have seen this so many times, and almost 100% of the time it ends really bad for them, there partners, there families etc (which saddens me). Since I meet a lot of these people early in my life, (I got kicked out of home at 16), its put me off ever self medicating. I just see it as ending in disaster from the experences I have seen in others, (university of life I guess). I feel quite lucky to have had these experences. An example, a bad situation at the time - a cracked out friend that was self medicating chased me with a knife like a crazy women, while addicted to crack...... Really put me off that drug and am never going near that **** EVER, ( in the end it was a experence that I learnt from early in my life, and it gave the women concerned a wake up call, maybe it would have not been so great if she stabbed me though lol).

When I see professionals about my mental health issues they always ask me about my drug and alcohol use, and I say I only have a couple (and I mean a couple) of drinks every 6 months or so, and I don't do recreational drugs. Sometimes they ask me why I don't, and I mention the self medicating thing. Sometimes they just don't beleive me, because drug and/or alcohol use is so high in people within my group of mental illness. Also sometimes im looked on as a bit of a purde, like im really anti-drugs, which im not, ( I feel drugs that are not as addicting, could be used by mentally healthy people occasionally for fun and be fine, but I feel self medicating is the danger - Im also pro-legalisation of drugs).

Instant happiness from substances does not always equal a positive long term outcome, Experence from seeing others has shown me that.

TazsDad
06-13-13, 05:00 PM
How does one become addicted to alcohol? Drink enough consistently enough. It is an EXTREMELY addictive substance. If you have two drinks a day, (2 mixed drinks, 2 beers, 2 glasses of wine) for a couple of years, your body will become addicted to it.

That's not the same as exhibiting alcoholic behaviors. In my experience, there seems to be a difference of some sort.

Why do people enjoy drinking? In my case, it was to relieve anxiety and depression. I felt better after 2-12 beers. 6 or 7 shots of Tequila. After that, I started feeling ****ty. The next morning, I felt worse.

What stopped me? An accident I caused in 2005 while driving drunk. I hit 2 cars in front of me that were stopped at a stoplight. I had to ride in the same ambulance with one of the people I hit. She had minor injuries, as did I. Yet, she screamed all the way to the hospital. I was so ashamed I cried.

I thank God I did not cause any worse injuries than that. By the time I went to court, I had completely stopped. I haven't had a drink since.

If you don't like alcohol, you're a very blessed person.

Pat

TazsDad
06-13-13, 08:32 PM
Instant happiness from substances does not always equal a positive long term outcome, Experence from seeing others has shown me that.

Well said. I advise you to keep remembering that, it's a good thought.

Pat

Hayden_NZ
06-14-13, 04:18 AM
@ Tazsdad, its stories like yours that help people not go down that road, or if they have just began to turn back. Im lucky I learnt my lession early in my life, mainly from having friends in situations and seeing there pain they were experencing. I think I was blessed to of seen it, I really learned from those experences. I also never looked on these people as being "bad", I saw there addictions for what they were an excape, from depression, anxiety, abuse etc.

TazsDad
06-19-13, 10:04 PM
@Hayden, I'm glad you were able to avoid that. I think I was extremely blessed to pull out of the stuff I was into. Some people I knew didn't make it.

Pat

Kathlyn
06-21-13, 04:54 AM
Hi.

Seriously, its because I am constantly looking for something to jolt myself. And alcohol does that for me. Yeah, that doesnt sound so right. LOL. I dont drink alcohol all the time, but only because I consciously take the effort to control myself. But if only I do not have any work commitments or responsibilities, I am sure I would have happily jumped over the edge.

I read somewhere that ADDs doesnt process risks well which is true in my case. I just dont care of the outcome if it only affects myself.

But I never drink until I lose my consciousness. I dont know why. Somehow being conscious is important to me. Which is why I never took drugs. I'd like to be over the edge, but still remain in control. Does that make sense?

Anyways, I love my whisky and cigar session every once in a while. I think its my reward to my brains for having survived the hectic world and I am giving it a small reprieve.

arxonius
07-14-13, 09:34 PM
One thing that i've never really understood, is how somebody can become addicted to alcohol.

To me, alcohol is something that makes me feel even more depressed and extremely dizzy/sick, even if I don't consume a huge amount.

Although I have a drink every now and then, just to "fit in" as it were, I could never really vision myself being hooked on the stuff, as I see very little benefit from alcohol consumption.

So I have to ask the question to any current or ex alcoholics. How do you actually become addicted to this stuff? :confused:

What's its appeal that managed to keep it's grip on you?

A little alchohol can make your problems seem a little better,so you drink a little today. You do the same tommorow. And the next day. When things are a little worse,you drink a little more. Pretty soon,your brain adapts to it,so you need more. And more. And it has you,becuase now you need a certain amount just to be whatever normal is for you. Its like any other addiction.

ADDinHDefgHi?!
07-21-13, 07:35 AM
I used to hate alcohol for the same reasons as the OP.

I did like to occasionally get drunk, like when I was traveling as a teenager and sleeping on people's floors. I realized that when I was drunk enough I could tolerate surroundings that would normally bother me to no end.

But I still only drink very rarely for years, I enjoyed weed and couldn't understand the attraction of alcohol besides the occasional drinking binge.

The thing that changed things around for me was when I started working in bars as a musician when I was in my early 20's. I realized after one or two drinks something in my mind seemed to clear. I felt sharper instead of groggy, I was able to talk to anybody, my social life and sex life improved significantly when I started to drink regularly.

This phase lasted a while and actually helped me more than it hurt me at first. I was able to control my drinking until I couldn't. It's hard to say exactly when I crossed that line. I began to crave alcohol earlier and earlier in the day, this was new for me, I should have seen it as a sign. Instead I just found excuses to drink earlier. As a musician and a songwriter it felt like my job, I milked it for all it was worth. Learning the names of all the bartenders who worked the dayshift felt like an accomplishment at the time. A rite of passage. Reading Bukowski and listening to Hank Williams didn't help my cause. Or maybe it did on some level.

I never really felt like I was out of control when I was drinking, apparently my friends didn't agree with me though. But I saw my friends as out of control alcoholics, I was like "who are YOU to tell me I drink too much!".

It took a toll on my career, I began to lose gigs. Bandleaders started to get a worried look on their face when I ordered a drink. I've had to relearn my job in a way, I didn't drink alcohol at all for years at one point and it was hard to adjust to being sober while everyone else was drinking. Enter Benzos and a whole new world of trouble!

Blanched Dubois
07-21-13, 09:29 AM
I've never been a drinker. I don't like 'partying' all i ever wanted was to 'feel normal'. When i've hung out with drinkers i was always the odd man out so i stopped and only would go out 'drinking' if everyone was going dancing - then it's worth it.

now i'm too old to get off the couch i think - am writing some - having crappy human experiences since starting meds for the adHd and burnout from the kids situation - and our situation with the home i gave away and it came back

i often wish i could just be like 'everyone else' but then i'd start bleating and who would that help? lol

Rebelyell
07-21-13, 10:17 AM
A good buzz.

stef
07-21-13, 11:16 AM
A good buzz.

so do i, i have 3 or 4 drinks every saturday (with friends and before/during dinner), bright and chatty and fun, but i see how it could become a problem (theorerically) because i really love this and have a really low tolerance for alchohol.

Rebelyell
07-21-13, 04:41 PM
I think alkyhol leads to..= sex drugs n rocknroll and all out mayhem n chaos.:D

Blanched Dubois
07-22-13, 10:18 AM
I think alkyhol leads to..= sex drugs n rocknroll and all out mayhem n chaos.:D

lol

{{{{rebel}}}}

Fraser_0762
07-22-13, 11:35 AM
I think alkyhol leads to..= sex drugs n rocknroll and all out mayhem n chaos.:D

If I knew alcohol could be that much fun, I would have started years ago. :)

Nate W
07-22-13, 08:55 PM
I get divorces, foreclosures, the shakes/withdrawal, job losses, obsession of the mind to always want to drink, hangovers of the most brutal magnitude, and I end up doing things that I hope no one has witnessed me do. Needless to say I don't drink any more.

Somehow I never got a DWI (I drove drinking all the time). I came very close a few times. One night, after midnight I was drinking and driving in my 1956 Volkswagen Bug (it was a long time ago) and I changed lanes into a police car, which clipped my rear fender and in horror I watched the officer bouncing across the median in his cruiser and he ended up in the opposing lanes of the divided highway. My only thought was that I was screwed and I was wondering how much time I was going to get in jail. Two other officers were following the first one. One stopped and questioned me (he asked if I had been drinking and I said I had "a beer two hours earlier") and the other policemen questioned the other officer that hit my car. Then, they helped me change my tire and said they would cover the damage to my vehicle. They admitted fault because they were responding to a call, well in excess of the speed limit, and without their lights on! The cops were apologizing to me. I was speechless. Another time a policemen let me go and another time I got away from the police after they followed me.

Learning how to live without alcohol on a daily basis was the hardest thing I ever did in my life.

--Nate

Laserbeak
08-02-13, 03:49 PM
In my experience, it just becomes a way of life. You always have a drink in your hand or nearby. I drank a lot of scotch after work for a long time, but it never became a real problem for me until later, actually 9/11. I had a bottle of vodka in the freezer and drank it flavored with just a bit of lemonade or something all day long. I live in New York and we ended up getting the whole week off for people to get back to normal and not fear going up a skyscraper. I drank myself into oblivion the entire week. Then, just a few months later, I slipped and broke my arm and got onto hydrocodone and oxycodone etc. and had to stay home and drank during that period as well. I needed two surgeries on my arm. Obviously this lasted for a very extended period of time. At the time I wasn't seeing a psychiatrist and getting the medications I needed, I had a lot of undiagnosed pre-existing problems that just were exasperated by everything that had happened. I'm still recovering, but have a good psychiatrist now so hopefully things are turning around for me. I'm already drink A LOT LESS after starting Adderall, which seems weird since people abuse it so they can stay awake longer to drink more.

I also would say that the common treatments for alcoholism are not very good. Alcoholics Anonymous is just a joke to someone like me, it feels like a religious cult. And I still want to enjoy a cocktail or glass of wine from time to time. They would also be against the use of controlled substances in all cases, ADD etc. plus even narcotic painkillers for a serious injury!

So anyway I'm rambling on here, but hopefully someone can get something out of what I wrote.

Nate W
08-02-13, 08:17 PM
Psychotropic medication is a touchy subject in AA, so I generally don't tell anybody in AA I take dextroamphetamine. I feel it is a personal decision. There is an AA pamphlet on the matter which basically says it is o.k to take medication subscribed by a doctor for a medical condition. I think the medication in question is mainly antidepressants and possibly pain killers after operations, but Schedule II amphetamines would certainly be right up there. I did have a sponsor once that was appalled at the idea of taking an amphetamine for ADHD and he said I needed to turn to my higher power for the peace and tranquility I needed. He also did a lot of pills in the past, so I could understand why he felt that way. But since I am a firm believer in better living through chemistry, I got a different sponsor. But I did get sober unmedicated and it was the hardest thing I ever did and took me from 1992 (my first try) until 2005. And I lost a lot in those 13 years. I drank in the beginning, and every day, to self medicate my ADHD, and it worked for years.

About AA: What we say is, "It's the last house on the block". That was the last place I wanted to be, but I was out of options and it was the only thing that saved me. Also, I never considered it a cult. I guess if one is on the outside it would seem that way. You do have to have a fundamental awakening and accept new ideas and concepts about the spiritual realm, something I never had a need for before. AA is not a place where they teach you how to drink responsibly. (I drink responsibly now--by not drinking). Because if you are the real alcoholic, no matter how much time passes, if you drink even so much as half a glass of beer, you will return the devastating drinking of the past. It may not be tomorrow, but it will be sometime. If you are alcoholic, you need to be in AA life long, because if not, your mind MAY tell you it is either alright to drink, or that it is a good idea to drink. There is no way of knowing ahead of time if you are the one that will or will not drink again. But if you do, it may well kill you. We alcoholics have great forgetters, we have to keep it fresh as to what will happen if we drink again.

And once I got sober, I never entertained the notion (or option) of drinking again. Even if I tried, it would not give me that ease and comfort that the first few drinks gave me in my youth. All it would do is bring back the craving and obsession of the mind for more of the same.

--Nate

Conman
08-02-13, 08:26 PM
i do not like boozing. i dont understand how some people get ****** up nightly. i do not like being drunk, but i dont mind a few drinks. especially if it's a chilling drink like a white russian

doiadhd
08-02-13, 10:27 PM
drink makes me drunk
stops boredom
makes me skint
helps me socialize
takes my mind off things

Blanched Dubois
08-02-13, 10:32 PM
I think alkyhol leads to..= sex drugs n rocknroll and all out mayhem n chaos.:D

still waiting LOL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9Yq5m9eLIQ

Blanched Dubois
08-02-13, 10:46 PM
i do not like boozing. i dont understand how some people get ****** up nightly. i do not like being drunk, but i dont mind a few drinks. especially if it's a chilling drink like a white russian

yah alcohol and me - never went together - lol~ however a wonderful meal with many gourmet servings and a nice old and i mean old glass of idk something like i had at the cedarbrook lodge in seattle one night a couple weeks before i evidently died and came back again lol true story

i just the pic of food comes up and if any of u ever fly thru Seatac (Seattle Airport) have a taxi take yu 10 min up the road to this hidden number one in the entire usa as per travel maven's the finest restaraunt/inn and i mean it IS - the protected wetlands wind thru the outside and lead seamlessly into the glass and wood sculpture of a bar fine dining room with a fireplace so big you could stand and blown glass sculptures everywhere and light and man 50 yr old scotch

{http://www.cedarbrooklodge.com/?gclid=CNKI1omh4LgCFadj7AodhFIASA}

hidden treasure right near the airport but you would never know it

doiadhd
08-02-13, 10:50 PM
p .s-i enjoy being around others who have had
a few drinks,conversation seems to flow better and
interaction becomes,enjoyable.

oh,and if your a manual worker
hard labour,it is painful and sore at
the end of most days,and a nice cold fizzy
pint,sorts that out. . .and washes the dust down.

sometimes i think that the gas does more so
than the liquid. . .where does all that gas go

Conman
08-02-13, 11:16 PM
i will admit the one good thing alcohol does for me is the increased socialness along with the people equal or greater than my current state in drinking. but i dont need to keep going all out like everybody else does...but then i feel weird being the only person not being a sloppy *****

fracturedstory
08-21-13, 10:48 PM
Eases nerves, helps me be more social.
Have more fun after a few drinks. Everyone opens up more.
I'd never go to a gig sober. I get too stressed out and feel like punching people.

I'm still trying to find my balance. I think between 3-4 beers. 2 is too little and 6 is too much and I lose count from then on.

In the rock/punk scene you need incredible resistance and self-confidence to not drink. I usually average 2-3 beers when I go out.

Fraser_0762
08-21-13, 10:53 PM
People are certainly easier to socialize with when they're a drunken slob. (Because then they're speaking my language)

Only issue is some people have a tendency to get angry and violent with a drink in them. You have to be weary of the sharks.

I wish everybody around me could just be drunk all the time to be honest. I'd probably have a much easier social life.

Rebelyell
08-21-13, 11:06 PM
Like the Ramones song goes I wanna be sedated.

birdlives
08-26-13, 04:28 AM
Before I was diagnosed, I always had a substance that I was dependent on. Dissociative drugs such as ketamine and methoextamine usually being my preferred substance. Alcohol, though, being a close second

I can't say with certainty that I was ever addicted to a single drug. I'd often substitute various substances for my preferred one with minimal psychological symptoms that I'd usually attribute to an addict. Rather I suppose I was addicted to having an altered state of mind.

Nevertheless it was in the midst of an alcohol substitution and subsequent binge that I finally went to a doctor for some kind of help for my situation. At first simply because of my inflamed liver and a possible depression.

I am now beginning to reflect on why I was drawn to drugs, with treatment by a pdoc and psychotherapy.

My understanding of why I believe I was and to an extent still am (although now not hopeless) drawn to alcohol and other mind altering substances was because of the turmoil in my mind of being a failure. Hyperfocus and success in subjects that I was passionate in, which never seemed to amount to much in the long run, would always reinforce in my mind of how much of wasted potential I was.

I suppose many here can relate to the last sentence. But this goes to why I now believe to I was drawn to alcohol.

For me, like others have said in this thread, alcohol did make me more depressed. And I also have a pretty bad predisposition for the sickening hangover effects of alcohol. But even despite a worsening of depressive thoughts, its critical affect for me was to shift the blame of the negative thoughts away from me.

Essentially. on alcohol, the perception I had of the situation I was in life was made worse but more importantly it gave me the mind state of believing it was not my fault. This is great relief from a sober mind which is constantly reminding you and convinced (and possibly rightly so) that you are the cause of every failure in your life. I can't say this is why others are drawn to alcohol. But this is my theory of what I got out of alcohol.

MX2012
08-30-13, 12:11 PM
Our society tells us it is sexy, cool, and adult to drink, so I did it to fit in.

In reality, alcohol is a toxin and poisonous to the body.

While I never became an alcoholic, I abused alcohol. It didn't take much to get me drunk.

While I don't drink much now due to a stomach ulcer, for years I invented games to monitor my drinking. Once, I decided to limit myself to ten drinks a year. That worked for several years. Then, I decided if I went out to have only one drink. That worked pretty well for years. When I retired, I began to have a beer or glass of wine almost everyday, more out of habit than for taste. The stomach ulcer ended that trend which I do not regret. I regret the ulcer but not not drinking.

Illumination
09-15-13, 08:06 PM
This is a fascinating thread. Thanks to everyone.

As I was reading, I realised that since being dx'd and taking medication 5 days a week on average, I no longer have the desire to drink.

I used to drink for effect/social anxiety; 2 was good enough for that, helped me be more outgoing/welcoming/friendly/able to chat at NT levels. I could only tolerate max 4 over a few hours which would disrupt my sleep for the night and always left me feeling flat/depressed/unhealthy the next day, but it seemed worth it to get through the social needs at the time. Tried more than 4 once, and couldn't stand feeling nauseous and dizzy so that was always my max limit. 3 was my preferred limit unless at a long social evening.

One of the responders here mentioned something that struck a chord, to do with wanting it earlier in the day. I found myself in this situation earlier this year, including wanting it more frequently in a week, not bingeing, not extreme intake, not excessive levels per week, just increased frequency. Thankfully at some conscious level I recognised that it was a symptom of something else going wrong (stress), so chose to not have any for a few months and focussed on reducing issues in my life. However, what concerned me a bit was the fact that it appeared to have become a behavioural coping mechanism, and I found myself needing to cognitively talk myself out of not having it for the first two weeks. It seemed to ease off after that. Then I became quite cautious about only having 1 drink on any occasion, and rarely, for a quite a while. Didn't want that 'need' taking control. Sounds like I might have been lucky.

Now that I take ritalin for ADHD, alcohol in any form doesn't attract me at all. I occasionally now have 1/2-1 wine with a meal with someone, but as a complement to food, not for effect, and the wine has to be of really high quality to make it worth opting for it instead of a juice or water. If I don't like it, I'd rather leave it than drink it, whereas in the past I would have consumed it for effect. Medication has helped not only with my attentional needs, but social and associated anxiety as well. Far and beyond more effective.

Rebelyell
09-15-13, 09:34 PM
More like a mean *** hangover more n more, I think it has to do w im on 2 antidepressants n drinking just doesnt mix.

Blanched Dubois
09-15-13, 10:03 PM
More like a mean *** hangover more n more, I think it has to do w im on 2 antidepressants n drinking just doesnt mix.

a shot with you rebel would be a riot but ackohawl is like poison in my system no can never could and haven't werra much at all in my life but a reallly good german beer i'd do with a quality mate eh? a rare swig if ya get a shock - it's those instances when something 'happens' sometimes requiring a clink
i think

capiche?:giggle:

Rebelyell
09-15-13, 11:30 PM
I love german beer warsteiner, n others.jaggermeister n licorice sambuca.ohh yeah.

DichotOhMy
09-28-13, 03:59 AM
I quit a few months ago, so I have a perspective on this fresh in mind.

For me, that feeling of serenity after about 2 double bourbons was indescribable. My racing inner monologue and broken inner radio, which I carry with me every waking moment, would slow down. Latent boredom would morph into a strange sort of focused, but non-directed excitement, and other people and situations become so much more interesting. To contrast these paradoxical positive effects, just one drink led to significant worsening of my ability to perform anything mentally taxing and requiring sustained attention to learn. But that didn't matter, because when I drank more, I felt like I had more skill to perform work tasks and ability to be creative. On that threshold of having drank a lot, but not quite to the point of the room spinning, I felt capable of incredible introspection - like if I could keep this up I would learn profound knowledge about myself and new solutions to complex personal problems.

To some degree, that notion was actually true; however, that introspection would go to dark places more often than not, which set in forth a negative-feedback loop of alcohol sickness and malaise that had me drinking more and more. First I would cheat with hair of the dog, then I would cheat with some drinks at lunch, then I would keep a nice buzz on all day while working and pound bourbon or vodka to oblivion before it was finally time to go to sleep. Rinse and repeat. Pound a little more once you wake up after a few hours. Somehow I got away with my superiors smelling the booze on me, but never getting seriously punished. I got away with driving drunk hundreds of times while never getting a DUI. Eventually, that serenity of an alcohol buzz is impossible to really find anymore and I was destroying the better part of a liter of vodka (at 140 lbs) every single day. Darker notions led me to the realization that I had to quit, like yesterday, and seek help for my latent problems I was ineffectively self medicating.

Like other drugs I have had problems with, I think that a large part of my problem with alcohol has to do with trying to chase that feeling of elation that one feels when the drug is a fresh, novel experience. I also felt strange and paradoxical relief from some ADHD symptoms from drinking, yet significant worsening of others after just one drink. I think alcohol is especially dangerous for us in that it has a way of inducing a personalized hyperfocus that is deceptively positive, but actually almost always negative, and capable of being incredibly dark and destructive like few other things can be.

MX2012
09-28-13, 03:53 PM
For me, I enjoyed drinking for years. I was happy chatty, high etc. I never drank a whole lot but I did get drunk, alcohol was never a problem for me. About 4 years ago, Im not sure why I started drinking everyday. I required more and more to get that same buzz even though I really wasnt getting the buzz I wanted. It started as more of a learned behavior at first. I would make a drink and chat with a friend for hours. Then I made drinks and didnt chat with her, then I didnt have her as a friend at all and the drinking was still a problem. If I could drink safely and not have the equivalent of a physical allergy to alcohol I would . After a lifetime of mild drinking i became an alcoholic in 6 months 4 years ago. Its like a switch was turned on in me and I have no idea why. Thankfully I am clean now but it was by the skin of my teeth.

Sarahsweets -- thanks for your story.

There is so much to learn. I was not aware that one could become an alcoholic later in life after drinking "socially" for years.

Wow, scary thought. Red flag for me since I drink off and on, while it is usually about 1-2 beers, it could creep up on one.

Daydreamin22
09-28-13, 04:03 PM
a huge hangover unless it's not cheep whine or liquor. Beer is so gross to me. ugh.

ActionAimz
10-07-13, 10:46 PM
I sometimes wonder how people in the music scene can drink so much alcohol and even take swigs out of a bottle of red wine on stage, and still not become an alcoholic. Some people do and are even doing hard drugs. I just don't know how I could survive being surrounded by that.
I'm hardly surviving as one who just attends these gigs. The last time I was sober at a gig was in January. And I've been to a few gigs since then. But 5 beers is a lot to me and sometimes I don't have more than 2. Lightweight I am. After about 5 glasses of red I'm ready to pass out. I suppose it's a good thing. I don't get ridiculously drunk and I don't tend to enjoy hangovers so there's a significant break between my next drink.
A. They aren't all true alcoholics, people in the music scene, just abusers. A true alcoholic cannot stop drinking without help and absolute abstinence. It's a body chemistry thing. Some people can take it or leave it. Others -- once they take it, they physically cannot leave it.
B. People build up a tolerance for alcohol over time. The only reason why it's taken me 43 years to realize that I am an alcoholic, is because like many in this thread, too much alcohol would make me sick. So I was able to temper it for years. But over time, your tolerance builds and you are able to consume more without having the same adverse affects. I know an alcoholic in AA who would black out inevitably while drinking, but never has experienced a hangover the next day. Another AA member said she never experienced the room spinning or throwing up no matter how much she drank. But they are alcoholics, not because they tolerate it better, because they could not go a day without drinking. Basically, f you cannot predict with certainty what you will do when you start drinking (like have a blackout) then you are an alcoholic.

BTW, five glasses of wine is at least a bottle. Nobody should be able to tolerate that at once. It's not normal. It became the norm for me, and that's when I knew I was in trouble. People who are not alcoholics will probably have one glass of wine, and cork the bottle, not thinking about it again , or obsessing over it -- just enjoying a glass of wine. Alcoholics will have to drink the entire bottle.

It is interesting though, consider Led Zeppelin -- they probably all drank and drugged, but not all of them drank themselves to death -- just the one who was a true alcoholic.

ActionAimz
10-07-13, 11:06 PM
This is a really interesting thread.

I got alot out of drinking. I can't lie. I have been sober for 30 days, through AA. I am more depressed and more ADD than ever. But I'm told this is normal in the early stages of sobriety. So it goes.

What drinking did for me is allow me to escape, numb my feelings, feel comfortable in my skin. I controlled my drinking for years because I knew in the back of my mind that I had a predisposition to become an alcoholic.

Plus I like wine. I love red wine. It kills me that I just can't drink one glass and leave it alone. If I open a bottle, I will drink the whole bottle. Period. That is the fundamental difference between an alcoholic and a non-alcoholic.

As my drinking became more frequent it rendered my meds ineffective, and lead me to isolate myself and actually prefer drinking alone than with other people. That's not good. But I did it anyway. Being in a new town with no friends or family made it easier for me to do this.

Then I forgot or pushed aside any other coping mechanisms, because the easiest, quickest fix was drinking. When I started drinking everyday, or fighting the urge, I knew I had a problem.

So my therapist urged me to go to AA. As long as I was drinking there was no hope of therapy working. I did, and it's been amazing how effective AA is in helping me to come to terms with the fact that I indeed have a problem, and am more likely an alcoholic than not.

I feel like crap now, not going to lie, and I know a bottle of wine will make me feel better instantly, but it wouldn't be just one bottle of wine. So I call my sponsor and stick to the AA program in hopes that I will eventually feel as good as those who've been sober for years.

I was listening to a podcast yesterday -- a comedian was talking about his recent realization that he's an alcoholic he said if someone asks you why you drink and you say to "not feel sad" then "you're in trouble" You can replace sad with any feeling and it could spell trouble -- not feel angry, not feel stressed, not feel period. I am looking for better ways to cope with feelings now. It's not easy, but there's hope when alcohol is not in the way.

My therapist, who knows a helluva lot about addiction, said that if everyone did the 12 steps the world would be a better place. I have found people who are truly recovered alcoholics, to be some of the most caring, warm, centered people. And it's because they've done the 12 step approach. AA is not just to stop drinking, it's to learn how to better cope with life. Alcohol is merely an escape mechanism that will always betray you.

Fuzzy12
10-08-13, 01:05 AM
I think I've posted already but Anyway

It's strange but a bit of alcohol makes me feel more relaxed and more cheerful. I do crave alcohol but it's usually n when I'm stressed. I'm always stressed though. When my parents are staying with me I strongly crave a drink every night. My parents are worried because they think that I always drink so much.

Etc.

And so on
....

Rebelyell
10-08-13, 01:45 AM
Acid reflux, I swear im ready to go out to kitchen, open fridge open bottle of cabernet sauvignon n pour me a glass as I fell asleep for 3 freaking hours n now I cant get back to sleep.Really body Really!??

ActionAimz
10-08-13, 11:05 AM
Sarahsweets -- thanks for your story.

There is so much to learn. I was not aware that one could become an alcoholic later in life after drinking "socially" for years.

Wow, scary thought. Red flag for me since I drink off and on, while it is usually about 1-2 beers, it could creep up on one.

It can happen. It's happening to me now. They say alcohol is sneaky that way. It's harder to accept that you have problem if you've never been the type to drink all day everyday like very hard core drinkers, and if you are able to function and maintain your life like other sober people. But everyone starts with just a little bit. The hard core drinkers just started at a younger age.

Also, binge drinkers can be alcoholics. If you only drink on weekends, for instance, but you consume alot of alcohol, you can have a problem.

The key things to ask yourself honestly. If you say you are going to have just one, do you truly have just one without obsessing about it?. Do you drink alone? Do you drink to pacify feelings, aka self medicate.

It's not as scary as it seems once you admit to it and get help. Trust me.

Nate W
10-09-13, 07:22 PM
This is a really interesting thread.

I got alot out of drinking. I can't lie. I have been sober for 30 days, through AA. I am more depressed and more ADD than ever. But I'm told this is normal in the early stages of sobriety. So it goes.

What drinking did for me is allow me to escape, numb my feelings, feel comfortable in my skin. I controlled my drinking for years because I knew in the back of my mind that I had a predisposition to become an alcoholic.

Plus I like wine. I love red wine. It kills me that I just can't drink one glass and leave it alone. If I open a bottle, I will drink the whole bottle. Period. That is the fundamental difference between an alcoholic and a non-alcoholic.

As my drinking became more frequent it rendered my meds ineffective, and lead me to isolate myself and actually prefer drinking alone than with other people. That's not good. But I did it anyway. Being in a new town with no friends or family made it easier for me to do this.

Then I forgot or pushed aside any other coping mechanisms, because the easiest, quickest fix was drinking. When I started drinking everyday, or fighting the urge, I knew I had a problem.

So my therapist urged me to go to AA. As long as I was drinking there was no hope of therapy working. I did, and it's been amazing how effective AA is in helping me to come to terms with the fact that I indeed have a problem, and am more likely an alcoholic than not.

I feel like crap now, not going to lie, and I know a bottle of wine will make me feel better instantly, but it wouldn't be just one bottle of wine. So I call my sponsor and stick to the AA program in hopes that I will eventually feel as good as those who've been sober for years.

I was listening to a podcast yesterday -- a comedian was talking about his recent realization that he's an alcoholic he said if someone asks you why you drink and you say to "not feel sad" then "you're in trouble" You can replace sad with any feeling and it could spell trouble -- not feel angry, not feel stressed, not feel period. I am looking for better ways to cope with feelings now. It's not easy, but there's hope when alcohol is not in the way.

My therapist, who knows a helluva lot about addiction, said that if everyone did the 12 steps the world would be a better place. I have found people who are truly recovered alcoholics, to be some of the most caring, warm, centered people. And it's because they've done the 12 step approach. AA is not just to stop drinking, it's to learn how to better cope with life. Alcohol is merely an escape mechanism that will always betray you.Thanks for sharing about your early sobriety. I won't lie: Early sobriety sucked for me. What you are experiencing is completely normal. It will get better and the obsession of the mind will leave if you do what you are supposed to do in AA. You are in a hyper excited state due to the down regulation of the GABA receptors from years of drinking and suffering depression from the down regulation of your dopamine receptors for the same reason. Alcohol masses with many neurosystems.

The 30-day (sobriety) chip was the hardest one for me to get. I had about fifty 24-hour ones (and I should have had many more, I just stopped picking them up). I now have eight years without a drink, through AA. I have a different outlook on life.

Please be aware that there is a lot of bad AA out there. Going to bad meetings can get you drunk and worse, killed. Trust me on that one.There are lots of meetings that do not do what they are supposed to. What the AA group is supposed to do is in the AA Preamble.

I only go to study meetings that stick strictly to the (Big) Book and never to open discussion meetings. I worked the 12 Steps with the aid of a sponsor who did so himself, work the steps daily and I sponsor others. That is the ONLY thing that got me sober and I have been to the treatment centers--From a 15-beer daily habit (that's 3 bottles of wine). And before I did, I lost just about everything I had. I was at the point where I no longer got a lift from alcohol and drank to prevent withdrawal. I could not live with, or without, alcohol. That is a very dark place to be.

Oh, and in the early days, alcohol did everything for me, it was the elixir of life and was the end-all answer to everything. But in the end, by best (and only) friend turned on me and raked me through hell.

--Nate