View Full Version : What happens if someone with CF takes stimulants?


calcal
07-02-13, 10:14 PM
Is CF the same as adrenal fatigue?

I wonder what happens when someone with adrenal fatigue is given stimulants? Wouldn't this make it all worse? I mean if the adrenals are stressed out and produce too little cortisol and then you take a stimulant wouldn't this put more pressure on the adrenals again and force them to work harder again stressing them out even more? :eek:

I worry if I might have AF. I have a lot of stress and sometimes under stress I feel totally weak and jittery and can't even write anymore cause my arms are so jittery. :(

But I also don't know how to test for AF. It doesn't even seem to be accepted by doctors as a real disease.

Fraser_0762
07-02-13, 10:22 PM
It would be a bad idea.

CFS isn't currently believed to be a neurological condition.

calcal
07-02-13, 10:35 PM
AF is a hormonal issue with the adrenal glands not a neurological one.
But I'm not sure wether CFS is the same as AF. :scratch:

tudorose
07-02-13, 11:20 PM
I have fibromyalgia, Although it's not the same as CFS I find that stims make it worse so I only taken them on work days and on weekends when I'm expected to think. I find it makes the pain worse.

Fraser_0762
07-02-13, 11:47 PM
AF is a hormonal issue with the adrenal glands not a neurological one.
But I'm not sure wether CFS is the same as AF. :scratch:

Stimulants can burn out the adrenaline glands further. I wouldn't recommend using them for adrenal fatigue.

I caused temporary adrenal fatigue in myself from abusing caffeine for too long.

calcal
07-03-13, 08:13 PM
Hi,
how did you find out you even have AF? I read that doctors do not even accept it as real.
And how is it treated? I drink a lot of coffee which is probably not good, hard to break as a habit. :(
I also have much stress.

@ tudorose

That's interesting, did you ask your doc about this? I wonder if he knows anything about this.

Fraser_0762
07-03-13, 08:16 PM
Adrenaline Fatigue isn't a diagnosable syndrome.

It's simply something that occurs when the Adrenaline glands have been over active for a long period of time.

Caffeine can be a major cause factor of this. So I would recommend gradually cutting down to help avoid withdrawal symptoms. After a couple of weeks with no caffeine in your system, you should find that you have more energy without the caffeine than you currently do with it.

calcal
07-03-13, 08:23 PM
Does this mean you didnt get any real treatment for AF?

But how did you know you even have it? Did you get your adrenalin measured in the blood?

I gotta do something but don't know how. Worrying about having AF makes me feel worse.

Fraser_0762
07-03-13, 08:34 PM
There is no "real treatment" for Adrenaline Fatigue.

All you can do is cut out any possible triggers from your diet. Avoid anything that's responsible for stimulating the Adrenaline glands. Caffeine is probably the biggest culprit.

So that's what to do. Give up Caffeine for a while and see how it goes.

calcal
07-03-13, 10:13 PM
That will be hard I am so used to coffee. You mean really no coffee at all?

I used to be a tea fan but I had to quit this too cause I read that tea is very high in fluoride. :(

And how did you even know that you have AF? What symptoms did you have?

tudorose
07-04-13, 01:31 AM
Hi,
how did you find out you even have AF? I read that doctors do not even accept it as real.
And how is it treated? I drink a lot of coffee which is probably not good, hard to break as a habit. :(
I also have much stress.

@ tudorose

That's interesting, did you ask your doc about this? I wonder if he knows anything about this.

I found out I have adrenal fatigue when I went to the naturopath and he did the iridology test (the test even pick up where I'd been hit by a car). I'm on a lot of natural supplements to help with a bunch of things.

As for the stims I haven't told my doc coz I ran out of time at the appt coz he was running really late and I had to get to work but basically all stimulants (incl sugar and caffeine) are bad for AF.

Fraser_0762
07-04-13, 01:50 AM
That will be hard I am so used to coffee. You mean really no coffee at all?

I used to be a tea fan but I had to quit this too cause I read that tea is very high in fluoride. :(

And how did you even know that you have AF? What symptoms did you have?

The worst of caffeine withdrawal usually passes within 3-4 days. Just drink plenty of water and keep yourself hydrated. Possibly take some high vitamin c supplements to help keep your energy levels up. You may get a few migraines so may need some mild pain killers (caffeine free!).

After about 2 weeks, you should be back to where you were before you even went near caffeine.

heytheredelilah
07-07-13, 04:37 PM
Stimulants definitely would not be a good idea, considering your system would have gone through a prolonged period of overstimulation for chronic fatigue to result anyway. Isn't chronic fatigue the worst case scenario though? You can get a disability payout for it here (family friend doctor was talking to me about it). Were you diagnosed with this? As far as I understand, people afflicted with chronic fatigue can not even walk, etc. they're completely burned out.

Many people have other symptoms of overstimulation like gut problems, high blood pressure, feeling anxious/nervous a lot, etc. Meditation, exercise, and other positive lifestyle changes could def help before any of this gets bad -maybe not after? I'm not sure how it's treated.

SquarePeg
07-07-13, 05:07 PM
I donīt agree that it would harm someone with CF. I have recently read quite a few times that ADHD drugs are being used as a treatment for some CF patients with success.

calcal
07-15-13, 09:39 PM
Hello,
with CF I dont mean those cases where you're totally sick like Addison's disease. I mean those cases where your cortisol levels are low because the adrenals are exhausted and so on. People usually take all kinds of herbs against this stuff. But the problem is when you take prescription meds then you usually can't tell if they mix with herbs or not.
I don't even know if I could have something which goes into the direction of CF. I mean I definitely have been having much stress for years. I also often feel restless and irritable and impatient. And under stress I also often feel physically weak in my body especially in the forearms and I also feel shakey.
I do have an endocrinologist but this guy sucks. I don't think that he could diagnose CF or help me with it. He wasn't even able to diagnose that I have hypothyroidism. :(

Slang Tang
07-21-13, 12:14 AM
I've heard of doctors prescribing stimulants to CFS. Sometimes it's the only thing that works. They're also used in treatment-resistant depression, weight loss therapy, narcolepsy and many other conditions. It always goes back to the risk vs. benefit analysis, which is different for every patient.

Considering that "chronic fatigue syndrome" has no single known cause, I don't see the harm in using stimulants to treat it. As long as your heart's healthy and your parasympathetic nervous system (the part that calms you down after being startled) isn't overstimulated, stims might be a legit alternative when all else fails.

In college I complained of constant fatigue and was prescribed Provigil (modafinil). I was still as tired as ever, but it prevented me from napping, which was kind of worse lol.

There are sooo many things that can cause fatigue. This is why it's vital for doctors to look for the underlying cause. CFS is not an end unto itself. It's a cluster of symptoms, not unlike IBS, that has to originate from somewhere. Anemia, hypothyroidism, chronic infection/inflammation, autoimmune disease, certain drugs, allergies...all of these can cause ongoing fatigue. To lump us all into one category seems lazy and inaccurate on the part of science/medicine.

Lizzie80
12-17-13, 10:35 PM
This is kind of an old thread, but doctors have been successfully treating some CF patients with Vyvanse (a stimulant) in recent times. I have fibromyalgia, which has some things in common with Vyvanse. I also have ADD. I can say, for myself, Vyvanse gave me back energy and strength physically that I thought was lost forever. It takes trial-and-error to find what works or doesn't because we're all different.