View Full Version : Has anyone figured this out?


bfuddled
08-07-13, 10:41 PM
As ADHD adults, have any of you figured out a system/routine to keep your house organized/clean? I'm not talking Martha Stewart, just relatively clutter free, you wouldn't mind someone dropping by for a visit?

I've read tons of articles/books, etc, but I can't seem to make anything stick. Granted, I have 4 young kids, my husband and I both are ADHD, which means NO ONE in this family is good at picking up after themselves and it's bound to be messy at times.

Any ideas/advice is appreciated.

BellaVita
08-07-13, 11:06 PM
Drawers, drawers, and more drawers! Stack 'em, maybe label them. It helps.

Raye
08-08-13, 05:14 AM
I force myself to do chores every other day. Dishes I do everyday, even if there are few, that way they don't pile up.

This helps me not to have over whelming tasks.

Amtram
08-08-13, 07:40 AM
Only bits and pieces and individual chores. When I empty the recycling or trash can, I spray it with cleaner and wipe it out so it doesn't get really gross and smelly. When I use the bathroom, I dry my clean hands with a paper towel, then use that towel to wipe down the mirror, sink, and faucet. (Also in the bathroom, sometimes I'll grab a hunk of TP and wipe down the rim and just flush it - something I might not notice is dirty, but a male visitor might!)

I try to associate a cleaning chore with something I have to do anyway, IOW. It's not perfect, and I'm not Susie Homemaker, but my house isn't gross.

Fuzzy12
08-08-13, 09:41 AM
Not really, but what I have figured out is an easier way to make your house look neat. Mainly by getting rid of stuff that looks as if it's lying around at random.

For instance, my bedroom is a mess. Dirty laundry is always piling up sky high, my bed side table looks as if it's just been ravaged by a hurricane, the window sill is doubling up as another shelf, etc. What does make a difference though is if I make the bed. Not perfectly, not beautifully but even if I just straighten out the duvet on top of the bed, it completely changes the look of the room (well, it goes from a war zone to a slightly less messy looking war zone... one where you have to look twice to realise it's a war zone).

If I want to do a quick clean of the house, all I do is vacuum clean, wipe the kitchen counters and the sinks/toilets in the bathroom. Hide all clutter by throwing it in some drawers.

With kids, I guess, it's impossible to not have things lying around but maybe you can get some of these huge toy boxes where you can just throw everything in. It's much easier than putting everything into its correct place but it looks decent enough (I think...:rolleyes:).

Arrowheads15
08-09-13, 11:49 PM
I cannot keep my apartment clean 50% of the time but I have a method that kinda works for me. I try to take a day every couple of weeks to really deep clean. I go all out. Every time i finish I swear that place has never been cleaner. After I do that it really motivates me to keep the place clean. But let's get real, that only lasts for 7-10 days tops. Then all my hard work slowly unravels. .....until the next time.

WheresMyMind
09-03-13, 08:38 PM
A few guidlines:
1- for cleaning, I never fall behind if I force myself to do some cleaning for 10 minutes before the morning shower. That's enough to dust one room, clean the surfaces in a bathroom, etc.
2 - clutter. The best way I've found for me is to own less. A LOT less. So, I force myself, before buying anything, to get rid of at least five other things. I don't make it more complex than that, they don't have to be five things of equal size, etc.
3 - Any time I walk into any room, I do a quick scan. If anything looks like it might be called clutter by anybody else, I do something about it. I may not do ALL of it, but I do one thing.

So, by attempting to have "de-cluttering" simply be a background task like drinking coffee, I spend some time every single day de-cluttering, and hopefully that will end up being a faster rate than my ability to re-clutter.

Doesn't always work, but I have learned to not expect perfection.

Dave