View Full Version : "Vegetables (ketogenically) rule and Animal products don't" says the microbiome


SB_UK
08-29-13, 07:06 AM
The cowboys’ poo showed that the prebiotic group managed to increase their good bacteria numbers by 133 million, small in bacteria terms, but an encouraging effect. The probiotic group saw little change over the week, but over a longer period there’s evidence that they can make a difference.
It seems from our investigation the best thing you can do for your bacterial health is treat your good bacteria to a prebiotic meal. Yay!!
Make your own probiotics in ketosis (probably much more effective than eating them) and eat veggies.

The best vegetables to feed good bacteria are artichokes, garlic, leeks and onions.My favourites.
allium allium all iummy.


http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v19/n5/full/nm.3145.html (http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v19/n5/full/nm.3145.html)Boo!!!


So say your microbiome - which is, for the most part - mostly you.

SB_UK
08-29-13, 07:14 AM
My favourites.
allium allium all iummy.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inulin
Inulin is a prebiotic bifidus factor (enhances the growth of bifidobacteria.)

meadd823
08-30-13, 06:44 AM
Manufacturers claim that inulin/FOS specifically feeds only good bacteria. Unfortunately, this isn't reality. A good example is Klebsiella. Recent studies have shown that inulin/FOS encourages the growth of Klebsiella, a bacteria implicated in Ankylosing Spondylitis and in increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut). Although present in the colon of most people, it is held in check by beneficial bacteria and is harmless WITHIN the colon. Once it gets to other areas of the body, Klebsiella becomes a major cause of infection (and sometimes death), causing serious infections in the urinary tract, pneumonia and in wounds. Inulin/FOS may indeed promote the growth of lactobacillus bacteria, but what other potentially harmful bacteria are being fed at the same time? Furthermore, many different species of yeast are able to utilize inulin/FOS for energy including Candida Albicans.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/022356_inulin_food_ingredients.html#ixzz2dRq69V1j

SB_UK
08-30-13, 09:10 AM
Recent studies have shown that inulin/FOS encourages the growth of Klebsiella, a bacteria implicated in Ankylosing Spondylitis and in increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut).

Hmmm... I have ankylosing spondylitis (apparently)
- and the diet fixes me :-)

SB_UK
08-30-13, 09:15 AM
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v500/n7464/full/nature12506.html
individuals with a low bacterial richness (23% of the population) are characterized by more marked overall adiposity, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia and a more pronounced inflammatory phenotype when compared with high bacterial richness individuals.http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v500/n7464/full/nature12480.html
Here we report that individuals with reduced microbial gene richness (40%) present more pronounced dys-metabolism and low-grade inflammation, as observed concomitantly in the accompanying paperInterestingly, increased consumption of fruits and vegetable and thus higher fibre consumption before the intervention seemed to be associated with high bacterial richness. -*-

Game over ?

An equal world (without money) in which we eat proper foods and exercise under the sun, whilst surfing the Internet (education) with a wife (pair-bond) and a dog.

woof!

Kids just off wherever doing whatever - nothing for parents to worry about in a fair societal infrastructure in which psychopathic child-abusers aren't selected for.

SB_UK
08-30-13, 10:11 AM
Manufacturers claim that inulin/FOS specifically feeds only good bacteria. Unfortunately, this isn't reality. A good example is Klebsiella. Recent studies have shown that inulin/FOS encourages the growth of Klebsiella, a bacteria implicated in Ankylosing Spondylitis and in increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut). Although present in the colon of most people, it is held in check by beneficial bacteria and is harmless WITHIN the colon. Once it gets to other areas of the body, Klebsiella becomes a major cause of infection (and sometimes death), causing serious infections in the urinary tract, pneumonia and in wounds. Inulin/FOS may indeed promote the growth of lactobacillus bacteria, but what other potentially harmful bacteria are being fed at the same time? Furthermore, many different species of yeast are able to utilize inulin/FOS for energy including Candida Albicans.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/022356_inulin_food_ingredients.html#ixzz2dRq69V1j
The disadvantage seems to be in taking inulin/FOS when the colon is filled with “bad” bacteria and yeast (dysbiosis) because then it may cause major problems.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/022356_inulin_food_ingredients.html#ixzz2dSfo3gj7
Of the nutritional fibers, cellulose was the most likely to be included in a traditional hunter-gatherer diet.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/022356_inulin_food_ingredients.html#ixzz2dSfwqyGD

-*-

So - the answer'd be maximal bacterial diversity such that cellulose/inulin/fibre etc is feeding a community of good, rather than a crazed gang of bad bacteria.