View Full Version : Am I an Aspie?


SpartanWoman
09-01-13, 04:22 AM
I'm not asking for a diagnosis, but I'd like some opinions. :confused:

Something has missing from my current diagnosis, and with new information that I'm just learning (my mom and dad both have aspergers), AND an autistic friend of mine pointing out my aspie traits.... I'm starting to clue in to what that might be. I'll be talking with my p-doc soon.

Right now, I'm diagnosed with ADHD, Bipolar, and Borderline Personality Disorder. Although there's a lot with Borderline that just doesn't fit (I don't drink or do drugs or sleep around or lie, like... ever).

Thanks to my hubby, I now know that I do certain things (like not know when I'm boring people, etc) ha! I'm an adult, so I've learned coping skills. I'm very artistic and creative, but also very left-brained about it at the same time. I can be very social or very not. Usually I love everyone and want hugs! Unless I'm in a paranoid mood, depressed, over-sensitized, or (like now) over-worrying about how I come across to people.

Aside from the ADHD and Bipolar issues, here's what's up:

When I was a kid:
- Didn't cry after being born and put in the nursery
- Sleep in the day, awake at night
- Only needed slight touch to stop crying, after that
- Started speaking early
- Would spend a lot of enjoyable time sorting little objects/collections
- Would freak out if my toy/nicknack displays where moved out of their certain, symmetrical patterns.
- Went through training to make prolonged eye contact
- Wore a button to tell people if I was happy or sad

Then and now:
- Special interests that are all-encompassing and I can't stop myself from researching them usually go on and on and on and.....
- Learn best when all senses are involved, and I can see/do/touch
- Poor personal hygiene
- Want to eat the same foods over and over
- Same with clothes
- Taking things literally (can usually identify both "meanings", now)
- Can't tell when I bore people/talk too much
- Don't know when it's time to change the topic
- But I have a preoccupation with what other think of me
- Self stimming / Rocking back and forth
- Sensory issues (tags, scratchy material, light touch, certain sounds)
- Mis-identify what people are thinking (usually negatively, now)
- Can't emotionally/sensory-ly handle mess (I shutdown)
- Difficulty cleaning up after myself
- Need routine, but .. have difficulty doing it
- Over moralization of actions. (My way is RIGHT)
- Meltdowns
- Rarely lie (also, I'm terrible at it)
- Difficulty summarizing
- Confused that others lie :confused:
- Difficulty identifying with own age group
- Very limited awareness of time and distance
- Overthink. Everything. ALL THE TIME.
- Looping phrases, words and events
- Mundane phrases I've picked up replay at times (years later even)
- I say some things the EXACT same way EVERY time.
- When off of Adderall: no awareness of boundaries, loudness of my voice, if I interrupt, how much I talk, time (at all), executive functions, etc
- When ON Adderall: those things lesson but don't go away. However, I'm aware of my social issues and get self-conscious and awkward when on Adderall.

I *DO* "switch" like normal Borderlines do, so not sure if that crosses over.

Anyway. Anyone on this board have any thoughts or suggestions?

daveddd
09-01-13, 07:17 AM
i think aspergers has been eliminated as a dx

silivrentoliel
09-01-13, 09:27 PM
i think aspergers has been eliminated as a dx

In the DSM-V? I think you're right... An autistic diagnosis covers it now, I think.

Fraser_0762
09-01-13, 09:35 PM
Wait, what..... Aspergers just doesn't exist anymore then?

fracturedstory
09-02-13, 02:39 AM
OP wasn't asking for a diagnosis, was just asking if she might have it to understand themselves better.

Fraser: Asperger's has been merged with PDD-NOS as just autism spectrum disorder. It's all one condition now, separated into 'levels of functioning.'

To OP: I relate to a lot of those traits and then there are some I don't. So you could be somewhere on the spectrum.

Could you please elaborate on what switching in Borderline Personality Disorder is? I still wonder if I have that. I drink, mildly do drugs, but don't sleep around. I also don't think my behaviour is out of control, but who knows...

Fortune
09-02-13, 02:59 AM
Switching might refer to splitting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splitting_(psychology)

It's a form of black and white thinking.

Flia
09-02-13, 03:29 AM
On the other hand I just read somewhere (sorry for not remembering where) that scientists are thinking maybe Aspergers is another thing than Autistic features, involving things that ONLY occur in aspies.
So maybe it will come back.

I see quite a few traits of Asperger in your description.

The thing about sleeping around and such with Borderline is just an example of what many people with Borderline do. It doesn't mean that everyone does.

It's just as silly as the notion that I don't have Aspergers because I have body language.

Especially when you have both ADHD and ASD, some traits contradict each other and others occur in both.

Fraser_0762
09-02-13, 05:08 AM
Fraser: Asperger's has been merged with PDD-NOS as just autism spectrum disorder. It's all one condition now, separated into 'levels of functioning.'

Yeah, it slips my mind from time to time. I just call it Aspergers anyway.

If you tell somebody that you're a level 6 or 7 on PDD-NOS, they'd be like "whaaaat?"

daveddd
09-02-13, 06:46 AM
well then yea it wouldnt be surprising to have some pdd

adhd should be a pdd anyway

most people with borderline have sensory issues and emotional regulation issues at birth , thought to be neurological

daveddd
09-02-13, 07:28 AM
Switching might refer to splitting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splitting_(psychology)

It's a form of black and white thinking.

that or the affective switching

with a drastic change in sense of self or self esteem


a borderline person can look in the mirror and hate themselves, think their ugly one minute

then a few minutes later, love themselves and think they are really good looking

it also applies to the switch of social and non social behavior


its one reason an autism dx doesnt fit that well, above what the doctor already diagnosed


autism is different with a marked disinterest in socializing, noticed almost from birth, correct?

Flia
09-03-13, 04:10 AM
Not necessarily a disinterest.

"trouble with", which can mean just about anything.
Not understanding when I'm being played with is one of mine.
I like socializing up to a point, and then I just have to get out of the situation.

daveddd
09-03-13, 05:22 AM
i guess that makes it tough for the op

adhd and borderline both have trouble with social situations

i thought most researchers used disinterest as the difference

i dont look into autism much, what is the difference then

people think im autistic sometimes, but i just have social anxiety and heavy avoidant PD traits

Flia
09-03-13, 06:01 AM
There's no "social interaction" trouble in ADHD, more than that we can become a "handful" sometimes. Talking before thinking, being impulsive and talking wayyyy too much.

With AS you can have trouble reading body language, or having poor body language yourself. Maybe believing what people say, not reading between the lines.
Hearing only the words people say. Saying exactly what you mean, not knowing what might be hurtful.
Talking about your interest without realizing that others aren't interested.

And there's a big difference between adults and children, depending on intelligence and self awareness.
I've learned to hold back about my main interest, sometimes asking if it's ok to talk about it. Learning about body language, knowing A means sadness etc.
That doesn't mean that I know what people feel, only that I've studied the science and know what lowered eyebrows mean.

Having AS doesn't mean you have to have all the traits, and not to the extent that children do. It's just the same with ADHD, and combinations can make the traits go into one another.

daveddd
09-03-13, 06:08 AM
http://books.google.com/books?id=mtccAAAAQBAJ&dq=adhd+social+interaction+thomas+brown&hl=en&sa=X&ei=9bMlUq6aNvPRsATb8YBQ&output=reader&pg=GBS.RA1-PT85.w.2.0.9


no there absolutely is

emotional intelligence is probably the most important part of executive function

Fortune
09-03-13, 03:07 PM
i guess that makes it tough for the op

adhd and borderline both have trouble with social situations

i thought most researchers used disinterest as the difference

There are so many characterizations of social troubles with autism. One overly broad generalization claims that "autistic people don't want to socialize; Aspies want to, but don't know how." This is actually false as generalizations go - there are people with both diagnoses and PDD-NOS who fit into either category. Some aren't interested, and I think most really do not know how.

My own interest waxes and wanes, although as a general rule I don't really "miss people" or "miss social contact" when I am out of touch. It doesn't mean I don't enjoy social interactions or don't like people, just that the way I approach them is different.

I would say the difference between BPD and autism is that with BPD, people with BPD are likely to read more into someone else's words or actions, and people with autism are likely to read less.

This isn't 100% the case, but seems more relevant to me than whether one is interested in being social or not.

There's no "social interaction" trouble in ADHD, more than that we can become a "handful" sometimes. Talking before thinking, being impulsive and talking wayyyy too much.

I can't find the post now, but ADHD does present with significant social impairments beyond those you listed. It's distinct to some extent from ASDs, of course, but it is present.

Flia
09-03-13, 03:44 PM
But there's nothing in the diagnose criteria for ADHD as far as I know.

Fortune
09-03-13, 03:54 PM
Not in the criteria, no, but the social impairments are real and present. The criteria aren't intended to be a comprehensive definition of any disorder. Rather, it presents standardized criteria for diagnosis.

Until the DSM-5, sensory sensitivities weren't in the criteria for autism, PDD-NOS, or Asperger's Syndrome, but the majority of autistic people seem to have such sensitivities.

Flia
09-03-13, 03:59 PM
There's only one thing ADHD'ers have in common, and thats concentration.

Anything else is consequenses of that.
I've met people with only ADHD that have no problems with social interaction whatsoever as well as people with severe social impairments.

You can't say what the majority has, since you haven't met, or heard about, more than a very, very small fraction of all the worlds autists.

Fortune
09-03-13, 04:30 PM
There's only one thing ADHD'ers have in common, and thats concentration.

Anything else is consequenses of that.

You sound quite sure of that. You're also wrong. ADHD also commonly presents with emotional regulation issues, for example. And I think that "ADHD is about concentration" is by itself an inaccurate description of what ADHD is. I would say it's overly reductive at the very least. Current theory is that ADHD is all about executive dysfunction ( http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/executive-function )

Some explanatory videos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF1YRE8ff1g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3VuV5Jvazs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQC-Nk5OOfE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cw8jHUkHiA

That last video covers a rather important social impairment that is common in people with ADHD - an inability to filter emotional responses that have social repercussions.

I've met people with only ADHD that have no problems with social interaction whatsoever as well as people with severe social impairments.

I don't see how this contradicts what I wrote, which is that there are social impairments beyond those you described associated with ADHD. They do not have to be present in every single person in order to be considered a part of ADHD.

Also, a study that discusses this:

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1404261&postcount=41

You can't say what the majority has, since you haven't met, or heard about, more than a very, very small fraction of all the worlds autists.

You don't have to meet every single autistic person to understand that statistically speaking, most autistic people meet the criteria for sensory processing disorder. That's why sensory issues were finally included in the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, under repetitive behavior.

This study found that 95% of the autistic children studied had some degree of sensory dysfunction:

http://www.sinetwork.org/pdf/tomcheck_dunn.pdf

And while that does not necessarily mean that 95% of all autistic people have sensory dysfunction, it does mean that if you find 95% of 281 children have it, that the concept of a high rate of sensory dysfunction among autistic people in general is hardly controversial.

Statistical significance means that one does not need to test every single living autistic person to determine that sensory processing issues are common among autistic people. If you pick a sample of autistic people and the vast majority of them have it, then you're looking at a very high likelihood that such prevalence is typical across the entire population of autistic people.

Flia
09-03-13, 04:42 PM
Dr Barkley talks about children mostly.
You can learn a lot from his videos, but I've also seen him generalize far too much sometimes.

So I disagree with you, but I won't argue any more.

Fortune
09-03-13, 04:50 PM
Barkley does talk extensively about adults - and every one of those videos has information relevant to adults. Those videos are from a CADDAC talk where he actually discussed ADHD in adults rather extensively.

He's co-authored a book called ADHD in Adults: What the Science Says which supports everything he stated in those videos.

He does overgeneralize, but this does not make his information wrong - just not universally applicable.

I am not trying to engage in a social contest over who has the most persuasive arguments. I am trying to present facts as I understand them. I can understand differences of opinion, but disagreement when presented with facts is rather perplexing to me, still.

daveddd
09-03-13, 09:09 PM
There are so many characterizations of social troubles with autism. One overly broad generalization claims that "autistic people don't want to socialize; Aspies want to, but don't know how." This is actually false as generalizations go - there are people with both diagnoses and PDD-NOS who fit into either category. Some aren't interested, and I think most really do not know how.

My own interest waxes and wanes, although as a general rule I don't really "miss people" or "miss social contact" when I am out of touch. It doesn't mean I don't enjoy social interactions or don't like people, just that the way I approach them is different.

I would say the difference between BPD and autism is that with BPD, people with BPD are likely to read more into someone else's words or actions, and people with autism are likely to read less.

This isn't 100% the case, but seems more relevant to me than whether one is interested in being social or not.



I can't find the post now, but ADHD does present with significant social impairments beyond those you listed. It's distinct to some extent from ASDs, of course, but it is present.

i can relate this to a several decade old argument in psychology

is schizoid PD and avoidant PD the same thing

millon described avoidant as actively detached from social settings

and schizoid as passively detached

you did say autism is prone to A and Cs right

maybe neither is inborn, and both are different coping mechanisms to whatever autism is at birth

he also has case studies of patients alternating between to two styles of detachment


another explored theory is overarousal of the nervous system(avpd) and underarousal (schizoid)