View Full Version : Genotype may predict stimulant medication side effects


Dizfriz
09-10-13, 02:26 PM
Article title:

Genotype may predict stimulant medication side effects

Some interesting findings perhaps showing some of the directions in treating ADHD that may be coming in the reasonably near future.

From the August 2013 ADHD Report:

In my words...too lazy to type verbatim

The study looked at 3(NTF3) genotype treated with Concerta.

The NFT gene has been associated with mood disorders and the effects of stimulant medications.

Children with the A/A genotype received the highest side effect ratings such as emotionality, over-focus/euphoria, proneness to crying and nail biting.

The G/G genotype showed the lowest in these side effects

The G/A fell in between.

The study was not overly large (96 children) but large enough to be useful.


Their conclusion: Variation in this gene may influence susceptibility to emotional side effects of MPH.

As we have discussed before, what this does is reinforce the possibility that this kind of genotype study may help in the decisions of what medications to prescribe for ADHD.

Cool stuff in my book.

Just for your interest,

Dizfriz

Amtram
09-10-13, 03:51 PM
This is being found in other medications as well - response to opiates seems to be connected to genotypes, too. I was also reading that there are several studies looking at nanotechnology to insert medications into a compatible genetic "frame" so they can be delivered more effectively not only in general but also to people with specific genes.

Amazing stuff is being done, for sure.

Daydreamin22
09-10-13, 09:54 PM
Hi Dizfriz, thanks for the post. That's pretty cool

Another thing if you don't mind me asking. I'm just wondering about your opinion about something. This is random, but I just pasted this onto a girl's thread, and I just am curious about what you think of upenn behavioral health. Last time I was there a sign said they were number 1 for adhd in the country. I had been on here so much just hanging out that I knew everything he was talking about and he complimented me on knowing my stuff. It was all because of here. I know you know a ton, so just curious if you even might know more. if that's possible.

http://www.med.upenn.edu/add/adhd.html

Blanched Dubois
09-16-13, 08:30 PM
This is being found in other medications as well - response to opiates seems to be connected to genotypes, too. I was also reading that there are several studies looking at nanotechnology to insert medications into a compatible genetic "frame" so they can be delivered more effectively not only in general but also to people with specific genes.

Amazing stuff is being done, for sure.

I'd love to see how an essentially 'electrical' problem with infinite possible environmental, genetic,physiological variables can ever be different than finding out a car u bought has the dreaded 'electrical problem' - is there any evidence showing any understanding how we measure electricity and neuron activity in an imaging device? and if so i'm thinking sketchy - i'd rather be distracted or in neutral and off meds completely than a test tube life experiment

but i'm from a different era lol

SB_UK
09-18-13, 02:37 PM
Meds worked well for me and then stopped working.

I wonder whether my genome changed ?

:-)

oh! wait a minute - it doesn't do that.

Probably in the microbiome then.

The madness can never end.

SB_UK
09-19-13, 04:32 AM
Meds worked well for me and then stopped working.

Why ?


"In our obsession with original sin, we do forget original innocence." Pope Innocent, of Assisi 15 Century AD


Because I changed reward system.