View Full Version : Zoloft amplifies my AD(H)D


hetware
10-05-13, 11:20 AM
After losing the best job I've ever had, I fell into a deep depression. I let my psychiatrist talk me into taking Zoloft. Now I sleep at least 12 hours a day, have very little motivation, and cannot focus on any kind of intellectual tasks such as solving introductory calculus problems. (I have a degree in computer science, and most of the credits for a degree in math.)

I started taking 25 mg of Zoloft per day, and didn't notice much of a problem. When she bumped me up to 50 mg per day, I started feeling lackadaisical and lethargic. She suggested that this would pass, and bumped me up to 75 mg per day.

Now I feel like I'm swimming in a fog worse than when I don't take my ADHD medications. All the dextrostat does for me now is to make me marginally functional.

Has anybody had this reaction to Zoloft?

Will this lethargy pass after I get used to the medication?

Should I be taking an SSRI if I have real existential reasons for being depressed?

purpleToes
10-05-13, 11:59 AM
After losing the best job I've ever had, I fell into a deep depression. I let my psychiatrist talk me into taking Zoloft. Now I sleep at least 12 hours a day, have very little motivation, and cannot focus on any kind of intellectual tasks such as solving introductory calculus problems. (I have a degree in computer science, and most of the credits for a degree in math.)

I started taking 25 mg of Zoloft per day, and didn't notice much of a problem. When she bumped me up to 50 mg per day, I started feeling lackadaisical and lethargic. She suggested that this would pass, and bumped me up to 75 mg per day.

Now I feel like I'm swimming in a fog worse than when I don't take my ADHD medications. All the dextrostat does for me now is to make me marginally functional.

Has anybody had this reaction to Zoloft?

Will this lethargy pass after I get used to the medication?

Should I be taking an SSRI if I have real existential reasons for being depressed?

I'm so sorry you lost your job. How long ago was that?

Do you have a therapist also?

I think antidepressants can be helpful when the depression is so severe that you can't think straight enough to benefit from talk therapy, or when the depressed mood no longer seems to correlate to situations in life. Many studies over the years have shown that talk therapy works as well as antidepressants alone. https://www.google.com/search?q=antidepressants+or+talk+therapy

hetware
10-05-13, 12:39 PM
I'm so sorry you lost your job. How long ago was that?


Months. It took me about 3 months to face the fact that I was suffering from major depression.


Do you have a therapist also?


I'm in a really good, intensive outpatient program at the VA. I have one-on-one, and group therapy.


I think antidepressants can be helpful when the depression is so severe that you can't think straight enough to benefit from talk therapy, or when the depressed mood no longer seems to correlate to situations in life. Many studies over the years have shown that talk therapy works as well as antidepressants alone. https://www.google.com/search?q=antidepressants+or+talk+therapy

I suffer from acute cognitive autonomy exacerbated by the mass psychosis of the external body politic. I don't expect I can get the rest of humanity to take the anti-psychotics needed to cure me.

purpleToes
10-05-13, 02:58 PM
I suffer from acute cognitive autonomy exacerbated by the mass psychosis of the external body politic. I don't expect I can get the rest of humanity to take the anti-psychotics needed to cure me.

I get it. I suffered from something like that most of my life. The world can be a real bummer, and it can get hard to see anything beautiful in it at times. Somehow, though, many people do manage to fight on, well aware of the insanity and the cruelty, without becoming paralyzed by it. If you read interviews with those kinds of people, they often say things like in order to cope, you have to remind yourself that the ugliness in the world isn't all there is; that there's still a lot of kindness and brilliance and many things to appreciate. They see good things in the world worth fighting for.

Honestly, for myself to cope, I had to admit to myself that I was too emotionally fragile to handle bad news, and actively avoided all serious news for a couple of years. It was hard for me because I'd always wanted to be an activist and a fighter and make positive change in the world. I still avoid reading articles about certain upsetting topics, not because I want to pretend the world is better than it really is, but because I recognize that I'm not strong enough right now to respond constructively. I do contribute a little money to causes when I can.

hetware
10-05-13, 09:05 PM
I get it. I suffered from something like that most of my life. The world can be a real bummer, and it can get hard to see anything beautiful in it at times. Somehow, though, many people do manage to fight on, well aware of the insanity and the cruelty, without becoming paralyzed by it. If you read interviews with those kinds of people, they often say things like in order to cope, you have to remind yourself that the ugliness in the world isn't all there is; that there's still a lot of kindness and brilliance and many things to appreciate. They see good things in the world worth fighting for.

Honestly, for myself to cope, I had to admit to myself that I was too emotionally fragile to handle bad news, and actively avoided all serious news for a couple of years. It was hard for me because I'd always wanted to be an activist and a fighter and make positive change in the world. I still avoid reading articles about certain upsetting topics, not because I want to pretend the world is better than it really is, but because I recognize that I'm not strong enough right now to respond constructively. I do contribute a little money to causes when I can.

Great wisdom there. I do believe that most people are predominantly good. Unfortunately that goodness comes with a naive trust which can be exploited by those who are predominantly evil. When good people unwittingly look to evil people for direction, bad things happen.

I'm trying to decide if a sardonic wit is a positive or a negative when dealing with my gloomy weltanschauung. "I suffer from acute cognitive autonomy exacerbated by the mass psychosis of the external body politic." Is both a satirical quip and an existential fact.

At the least writing the previous paragraph gave me a chuckle. :)

purpleToes
10-05-13, 11:50 PM
Great wisdom there. I do believe that most people are predominantly good. Unfortunately that goodness comes with a naive trust which can be exploited by those who are predominantly evil. When good people unwittingly look to evil people for direction, bad things happen.

I'm trying to decide if a sardonic wit is a positive or a negative when dealing with my gloomy weltanschauung. "I suffer from acute cognitive autonomy exacerbated by the mass psychosis of the external body politic." Is both a satirical quip and an existential fact.

At the least writing the previous paragraph gave me a chuckle. :)

It made me laugh, too. I could tell you (half) kidding.

evenkeel
12-07-13, 04:52 PM
I was on 150mg of Zoloft for anger issues combined with Concerta for my adhd. I took a break off the Zoloft because I was always tired. Didn't work out for me as my anger issues returned. I now take 75mg of Zoloft. Feel pretty good and more relaxed. I have come to the conclusion that I need this drug to control my anger and have a better quality of life.

425runner
12-24-13, 09:32 PM
You need to lower the dose. If 25mg worked well for you then there's no reason to listen to your doctor and take higher dose then that. You are the owner of your own body and too much of anything can be bad.

For example, I'm supposed to take 10 mg Celexa for depression but it's been a month and I'm still on 5 mg cause it makes me sick, tired, and unmotivated. My psych doc gave me a prescription for liquid Zoloft to start with 10 mg/day saying it hits dopamine as well as serotonin and shouldn't be too sedating. Haven't had a chance to make the switch yet....

janiew
12-24-13, 10:38 PM
Zoloft is a 5ht3 antagonist and can make things worse. Zoloft is not for everyone. Other SSRIs might work. It's a gamble.

TheEngineer
12-26-13, 11:36 PM
I find this very strange. Zoloft practically killed my ADD. This might suggest that ADD comes from multiple different sources.

janiew
12-27-13, 12:43 AM
We are all different. Zoloft might not work for all. Other SSRIs don't work for everyone.

Wellbutrin was a good SNRI for me back in the day.

There is no silver bullet - trial and error.

Twiggy
12-27-13, 01:50 AM
This reminds me when I was on a Ritalin/Celexa for a very short time a while ago.
Instead of helping my anxiety/ADHD, it made me feel like my heart was beating weird and got me all anxious.

Some meds just don't work for some people or the mg is way too much for that person.

janiew
12-27-13, 02:13 AM
We are all DIFFERENT - Adderall, Prozac, and Intuniv work well for me.

sarahsweets
12-27-13, 07:01 AM
you are doing everything you should be doing except I would question why the doctor would want you to go higher on the zoloft if a lower dose already made you feel like sh&t.