View Full Version : online games addiction


malaka
11-05-13, 08:07 AM
hey guys

i've been out from this forum for a long time and i've been playing some online games which is pretty much like "your life represents the game character" where you can get your bow or a sword and shield.

i know it sounds such a silly kind of addiction if you compare to the others but i think that just like the others it's good and fun at the beginning and then it gets way to repetitive and exhaustive.

so my question is, is it somehow related to adhd or is it just an addiction that could work for any kind of thing like alcohol, drugs, including games?

dvdnvwls
11-05-13, 01:30 PM
Hi, good to see you again...

I think it's sort of both. ADHD makes it easier for addiction and addiction-like things to happen. I guess be glad it isn't alcohol, because games are a lot easier to get away from. :)

So, now you know how easy it is for you to get sucked into something that isn't good for you. "Keeping an eye on yourself" is very important.

Have you looked at Jacksper's thread about software that you can set up to kick you offline after an amount of time you choose?

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=152936

Asylum
11-05-13, 09:10 PM
Anyone can get addicted to online gaming.

BrokenMind
11-11-13, 12:47 AM
:thankyou:Hi, good to see you again...

I think it's sort of both. ADHD makes it easier for addiction and addiction-like things to happen. I guess be glad it isn't alcohol, because games are a lot easier to get away from. :)

So, now you know how easy it is for you to get sucked into something that isn't good for you. "Keeping an eye on yourself" is very important.

Have you looked at Jacksper's thread about software that you can set up to kick you offline after an amount of time you choose?

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=152936

Alcohol, weed, and gambling have been easier for me to walk away from than games. I'm guessing you haven't gotten sucked in by them, yet.

dvdnvwls
11-11-13, 12:50 AM
Alcohol, weed, and gambling have been easier for me to walk away from than games. I'm guessing you haven't gotten sucked in by them, yet.
Luckily for me, none of the above. Thanks for the information - I would never have guessed that.

someothertime
11-11-13, 03:40 AM
Hey Malaka! I wondered what you'd been up to!

So, it's a bit of both... They key thing here is when you walk away from it does it enrich your life? In a few ADDBooks i've got they talk about when you say yes to something your also saying no to other things aswell....


Something to ponder... When we over absorb in things... when we come out we look around and the landscape of our lives has changed... Take a few secs each day to think about all the things in the world your thankful for, if games are one... sweet :) If they are far from what your devoting your time to then it's something to maintain awareness of.

DichotOhMy
11-12-13, 10:28 PM
Gaming can be a psychological addiction like lots of other activities or drugs, but free of the physical-addiction malaise of alcohol, benzos, or opiates.

I think that gaming (and internet browsing) in particular sooths the ADHD brain in the sense that there's constantly changing sights, sounds, and the potential for truly instant gratification from each and every choice made while playing. I feel the same way about riding bicycles as an outlet, but eventually you get tired after a few hours of doing that. You don't burn a lot of physical energy playing games, which makes gaming a potentially insidious waste of time that is difficult to snap out of. Anyone can become a gaming addict, just like anyone can become addicted to watching the news or any other mundane activity, but I believe gaming is more appealing to ADHDers as an outlet.

Oregon
11-14-13, 08:10 PM
Ever since Battlefield 4 came out, I've been on there way to much. I wouldn't ever say I'm addicted because I manage to get most of the important stuff done, but I understand how you feel.

AllenHill
11-19-13, 09:10 PM
im also addicted in online games like, ran online, cabal, WOW, and some others games, i cant stop playing...

:thankyou:

Alcohol, weed, and gambling have been easier for me to walk away from than games. I'm guessing you haven't gotten sucked in by them, yet.


can be meditate the gaming addiction?

RobotInDisguise
01-06-14, 02:01 AM
:thankyou:

Alcohol, weed, and gambling have been easier for me to walk away from than games. I'm guessing you haven't gotten sucked in by them, yet.

same. I guess it's our preferred form of stimulation. No fun without visuals, action, and sound effects. And guild. That's important too.

alcohol... hmm it's fun to drink but I've never experienced compulsive urges to drink. Games of any kind, however, are another story.

Ken2013
01-25-14, 09:39 PM
hey guys

i've been out from this forum for a long time and i've been playing some online games which is pretty much like "your life represents the game character" where you can get your bow or a sword and shield.

i know it sounds such a silly kind of addiction if you compare to the others but i think that just like the others it's good and fun at the beginning and then it gets way to repetitive and exhaustive.

so my question is, is it somehow related to adhd or is it just an addiction that could work for any kind of thing like alcohol, drugs, including games?

It's very possible to be addicted to online games, or computer games.

I used to be addicted to WoW and various other computer and emulator games after that, but have now quit such games cold turkey (with the exception of occasional online Board Games).

I think the allure of online gaming, is that there's the possibility to progress and improve on your character (particularly in MMORPGs), which makes it seem more tangible compared to your achievements in real life, along with the easy access of gameplay, along with the visual and auditory stimulation, which in combination with decent gameplay makes for a very addicting experience. But this in fact is feeding a vicious cycle, coz the more you neglect your "Real Life" in favour of video games, the more your "Real Life" deteriorates. Worst case scenarios include people getting divorced over WoW over neglect in the marriage.

My solution to quitting these games was that I seemed to be hopping from one game to another. I easily hyperfocused in the game trying to obtain maximum stats or beat the plotline (often with the aid of walkthroughs).

Then I thought to myself "What am I going to achieve once I quit this game and move on to another? What do I have to show for this? Will you remember this game much in 10-20 years' time? Life's too short to play all these video games. Think of all the other things that you could be doing with the hours that you previously drained on video games, like exercising or learning a new language or musical instrument etc."

I had to rationalize myself into quitting it cold turkey, but I must say the temptation to get back is strong sometimes. So what I do instead of actually playing the game again, is to just watch a "Speedplay" or "TAS" (Tool-Assisted Speedrun) of the game on Youtube just to be partially stimulated. That's usually enough to satisfy the cravings without spending hours on the game itself.

Now the next issue to defeat is Internet / Forum Addiction, that is much harder IMHO, especially when you're already socially isolated in real life.

Daydreamin22
01-26-14, 12:12 AM
Plan a future, what you really want in life... Read up on addiction. That way you'll know what's going on with you. Have you heard about gaming? That's beneficial in many areas of life.

My ex bf didnt go to class in college bc of gaming. He doesn't know what he was thinking. He's really smart and responsible. He still hasn't made a move toward going back to school. Idk what the deal was. He has a job but no college degree. He made straight A's in hs.

One day he walked away from it and never played for a few years. Until a little bit when we were dating. There was a new game out. It wasnt a big deal, but I actually could tell a difference the next day. He got stimulation not from talking to me but the games. He just didnt want talks much. (We worked next to each other) Not a big deal, just telling you his story.