View Full Version : Meditation for Adders


sarek
11-19-13, 03:56 AM
Sorry about the sudden thread spam. I had one of my creative urges. I promise that won't happen a lot.

A few times in my life, I have made halfhearted attempts to meditate. It doesn't work. I just cant sit still long enough. All my head does is think about "when can i go now"

A few months ago, thanks to Ginniebean's guidance, I have stumbled upon a method that seems far better suited for me. I will not get into the ins and outs and backgrounds of this method here as it would be off topic as well as a possible guideline violation.

But I can talk about the practical application in my daily life.

Instead of taking time out to sit and meditate, life itself becomes my teacher. I attempt to achieve self awareness as I go about my daily life.

To be self aware is to take a step back. Instead of living life, you look at yourself while living life. As often and as deeply as you can, you observe yourself.

What can one observe? Well, the mind does three things we can look at.

1. It functions and moves and does stuff. This is the moving function
2. It displays emotions and judges between good and bad. That is the heart function.
3. It produces assorted intellectual gibberish aka 'logic'. That is the mind function.

Its a bit more complicated than outlined above, I hope I have not over simplified but we can work with this.

Throughout your everyday life you can teach yourself to observe all these three systems in action. You can observe tension, stance, movement, mood, logical purity of thought.

For instance:

I found the body to be the easiest 'anchor' to help me focus. For the body you can:

- regularly check all the tensions in your muscles. -
- You can do a moving body scan switching attention between all the various parts of the body.
- You can review the way you walk and start to walk 'mindfully'
- You can chose an activity, any activity, and analyse it in slow motion. I used to be very loud and noisy with everything and self awareness has allowed me to be much more careful.
- You can do a complete body and mind freeze where for a short moment you stop all movement and thought
- You can pick up a sensation like a song on the radio or the rain on your skin, or a beautiful sunset and deliberately focus on it.
- You can do stationary or dynamic balancing exercises that require total concentration

As for the heart, you can try and listen to your feelings. Are you happy, are you sad? Are you angry? if you are any of these, can you find the deeper reason why this is so?
Listening to the heart is a powerful tool for emotional control. I have learned to refrain from expressing negative thoughts so other people around me no longer get infected with negativity. It also helps to preclude automatic negative thought patterns from running their course.

The brain is the most difficult function to be adequately aware of. Right now I am working on exploring the concept of truth and how it effects my thoughts and use of language.

sarek
11-19-13, 08:42 AM
Oh, one thing i forgot. Another easy awareness anchor is to check your breathing. And while you are at it, make sure you do more belly breathing and make sure you breathe more deeply, not so shallow.

Amtram
11-19-13, 10:59 AM
I know this isn't the same thing as what you're attempting to do, but like you, I've tried meditation (many kinds) and failed miserably. It's much like my problems trying to fall asleep - give me darkness and quiet and nothing to do, and my brain becomes like a herd of beagles looking for a fox, barking included.

Is it OK to say here that I consider certain kinds of work to be the most effective form of meditation? Things that are simple and somewhat repetitive, but that require a level of attention provide enough activity and stimulation that I actually can "be in the moment" and direct my thoughts. Gardening and yard work is great for that - pulling weeds, raking leaves, pruning and trimming, and so on. I can be fully mentally engaged in the task, without consciously focusing on what I'm experiencing, but still aware of my body and my emotions. Beading and hand sewing are also good, as is conditioning polymer clay (making things out of the clay is not the same - it's a creative process that requires a different kind of mental engagement - but conditioning clay or mixing colors takes time and nothing else.)

I don't need to actively focus on any specific meditative process, it just happens. Sometimes it's a different kind of meditation in which I can choose a thought and let it go. . .another form of meditation I tried lying down comfortably in a dark and quiet room that failed consistently. Sometimes I will nurture a creative thought and decide whether to act on it, or put it aside mentally. Other times, I will focus on a problem that's bothering me, and I'll be able to think calmly about it. By the time I'm done, even if I haven't come up with a solution, I've released the anxiety associated with it.

I think what I'm trying to say is that the meditative process might not have to be a goal in and of itself, but might come naturally in the right circumstances and environment.

As a combined type with (still) hyperactivity, I find it impossible to relax. Deliberately trying to relax is actually stressful for me. It means doing nothing, and it means nothing is getting done. So not only does the act of doing something put me into a potentially meditative state, I also end up relaxed when I'm done because I have a visible, material accomplishment I can point to as the result of the time spent.

You know I'm not a spiritual person, so I'm not looking for the same end result, but I've spent many, many years trying to find a way to accomplish some of the mental and emotional benefits I know come from meditation even without the spiritual component. This works for me.

I hope you don't consider this a hijack, because I didn't intend it to be. It's just that over the years, I've seen so many people here want to be able to meditate somehow (even people like me, who aren't looking for a spiritual experience) but who fail because the mindfulness part is impossible to achieve when their minds want to be doing so many other things at the same time. If you want to move this, I'll understand. But all of the actions you mentioned as part of the method you're trying can be done while "working," and for those of us who can't slow our brains down enough to do them on their own might be able to do them while we keep ourselves occupied with a repetitive but productive task.

sarek
11-19-13, 03:38 PM
Yes Amtram, you are right. Its quite possible to see the conscious pursuit of an activity as a form of meditation.
The key to making this work lies in the word conscious. Meditation and self awareness are conscious activities. The second your actions become automatic, they lose all meditative value and fall back into the realm of mechanical man.

The Japanese have a particular approach to this type of awareness through activity. They use the term do (way) for it. This entails developing an activity, no matter what it is, to absolute perfection.

Again, I need to stress that whatever mode one uses, the essence is in doing what you do in a conscious, a non mechanical way. If the action is taken over by muscular memory, it loses its value.

ginniebean
11-19-13, 04:25 PM
right sarek, the making of mandalas out of coloured sand mimics what Amtram is speaking of.

Amtram
11-19-13, 04:45 PM
Yes, the action itself isn't necessarily the meditation, but the thing that allows the meditation to take place in a mind that is otherwise to hyperactive to be in a meditative state.

Tara
11-19-13, 05:02 PM
I was making it more complicated that it needed to be. Once I realized the main difference between every day daydreaming and meditating was the breathing I started meditating more often. It's not as "scary" as I thought it would be...lol

ana futura
11-19-13, 06:27 PM
I know this isn't the same thing as what you're attempting to do, but like you, I've tried meditation (many kinds) and failed miserably.

I've said this before and I'll say it again. NO ONE can't meditate. Will the act of meditation be an extremely difficult and aggravating experience for some? Yes, definitely. But that still doesn't mean you can't meditate.

Attempting to meditate, no matter how poorly, is meditating.

Meditation is not the act of "clearing your mind". If you are under that impression, you are misinformed.

Meditation is the act of learning to observe your mind, and learning to direct your mind (say towards the breath). Yes, the time where your mind is wandering is not meditating. Meditation is when you notice your mind wandering and redirect your focus back to the object of meditation (usually the breath), or when you are focused.

No one will be focused all the time. Every one will notice themselves drift, often. If you notice the drift, that's meditation.

Yes, it sucks and it's stupidly boring and I HATE meditating. I feel the same way about eating vegetables. But both are very good for me, so I do them both anyway. No one said meditation would be pleasurable.

But the observation that attempting physical activities in a mindful way (walking, washing dishes, raking leaves) is a good way for the very restless to meditate without hating it is a very good point.

And, the action itself IS actually the object of meditation:

When you learn to do a sitting meditation, your object of focus is the breath. When you do a walking meditation, your object of focus is the lifting and placing of your feet. When you meditate while raking leaves, the object of focus is how your hands move the rake.

The activity itself is actually the meditation.

Another good technique for those who find meditation difficult and frustrating is using guided audio meditations.

ana futura
11-19-13, 06:30 PM
That herd of beagles you observe Amtram- that's supposed to happen. Meditation will be loud and chaotic for those of us who have chaotic brains, If you have ADHD, those beagles are always there. When you meditate, you learn to see things that are always there, but you are normally unaware of. Meditation is not intended to stop the chaos, it is intended to help you learn how to live with the chaos better.

If anything, meditation is the act of becoming aware.

It's unfortunate but it appears that the instruction and advice you have received regarding meditation seems very inadequate. You have several misconceptions. I think you would really benefit from seeking instruction from a meditation teacher who is familiar with ADHD.

I shared your perspective for a very long time. Then I received instruction from someone who knew what they were doing.

midnightstar
11-19-13, 06:44 PM
This information is useful thanks sarek :)

daveddd
11-19-13, 07:19 PM
I've said this before and I'll say it again. NO ONE can't meditate. Will the act of meditation be an extremely difficult and aggravating experience for some? Yes, definitely. But that still doesn't mean you can't meditate.

Attempting to meditate, no matter how poorly, is meditating.

Meditation is not the act of "clearing your mind". If you are under that impression, you are misinformed.

Meditation is the act of learning to observe your mind, and learning to direct your mind (say towards the breath). Yes, the time where your mind is wandering is not meditating. Meditation is when you notice your mind wandering and redirect your focus back to the object of meditation (usually the breath), or when you are focused.

No one will be focused all the time. Every one will notice themselves drift, often. If you notice the drift, that's meditation.

Yes, it sucks and it's stupidly boring and I HATE meditating. I feel the same way about eating vegetables. But both are very good for me, so I do them both anyway. No one said meditation would be pleasurable.

But the observation that attempting physical activities in a mindful way (walking, washing dishes, raking leaves) is a good way for the very restless to meditate without hating it is a very good point.

And, the action itself IS actually the object of meditation:

When you learn to do a sitting meditation, your object of focus is the breath. When you do a walking meditation, your object of focus is the lifting and placing of your feet. When you meditate while raking leaves, the object of focus is how your hands move the rake.

The activity itself is actually the meditation.

Another good technique for those who find meditation difficult and frustrating is using guided audio meditations.

I can sit there and focus on my breath and redirect when i start wondering. Ive learned to catch certain emotions throughout the day, even enough to stop my tics most of the time.


but with the letting things come while meditating /visapanna (SP)?, nothing comes, i feel like something should, but nothing does to observe, its like there is a brick wall there

what am i doing wrong ??

ana futura
11-19-13, 11:24 PM
Dave- I'm not quite sure if I understand you.

Are you talking about the "labelling" meditations, where you let your thoughts come , but then try to label the thought (by type, like "worry", or "planning")? Or the meditations where you purposely try to bring up old emotions to observe the body sensations that accompany them?

When I do those types of meditation I always use a guided cd. I get overwhelmed without guidance.
Are you using guided audio mediations when attempting the Vipassana techniques?

Sometimes when your mind seems blank you just aren't at the point of being able to identify the softer thoughts. You might think nothing is there, but it is. For this reason, I think it's helpful to have a solid base in Zen type sitting meditation (focusing on the breath) before trying the Vipassana type ones. I had a lot of guidance when learning Vipassana techniques, I don't think I would have really understood how to do it right without instruction.

ana futura
11-19-13, 11:49 PM
Ricardo's post here is very good-
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1571052&postcount=4
This is an excerpt-


I suggest mindfulness of breathe first and foremost. Then "body scan".. mindfulness.

I know of mindfulness meditators who do well with just these two forms of mindfulness as their core skills. In fact some do these two meditations every day and have been doing so even after having experimented with all of the mindfulness practices involved in an 8 week course.

funwithpinetree
11-20-13, 01:34 AM
Meditation is something I have benefited a lot from. There is a lot to learn from stillness. It is possible to have a mind free of thoughts. Ask yourself the question, "I wonder what my next thought will be" and you might observe a space free of thinking in words.

For me a huge part of meditation is acceptance and appreciation. To accept the breath as it arises and to have appreciation for it. And also to appreciate thoughts or ideas as they come into the mind and to observe them as they are. If you have eyes, they are always seeing if you shut or open them. The mind can be like that with thoughts, always thinking and commenting. You would not necessarily say to your eyes why don't you stop seeing, but you can observe and maybe also appreciate what is being seen.

daveddd
11-20-13, 07:02 AM
Dave- I'm not quite sure if I understand you.

Are you talking about the "labelling" meditations, where you let your thoughts come , but then try to label the thought (by type, like "worry", or "planning")? Or the meditations where you purposely try to bring up old emotions to observe the body sensations that accompany them?

When I do those types of meditation I always use a guided cd. I get overwhelmed without guidance.
Are you using guided audio mediations when attempting the Vipassana techniques?

Sometimes when your mind seems blank you just aren't at the point of being able to identify the softer thoughts. You might think nothing is there, but it is. For this reason, I think it's helpful to have a solid base in Zen type sitting meditation (focusing on the breath) before trying the Vipassana type ones. I had a lot of guidance when learning Vipassana techniques, I don't think I would have really understood how to do it right without instruction.

any good audio to recommend

i thought i wasnt suppose to purposely do anything , just let the stuff come up


im really repressed, i may be getting ahead of myself ,

someothertime
11-20-13, 07:13 AM
Sarek sir, the day you post spam.... is the day I post a concise and rigourous thread in the Scientific Boards :giggle:

davinci10
11-20-13, 11:03 AM
The only form of meditation that has worked with me is laughing meditation. What else can you think of when you're laughing genuinely? laughing fulfills your crave for excitement and thrill. and when you laugh continuously for a period of time then you calm down and forget depression for the whole day.

However, laughing meditation is based on two aspects.
1. Childlike playfulness
2. Making eye contact

which automatically turns into real laughter. you can only experience this if you form a group of at least 5 like minded people and start playing like a child and making eye contact simultaneously to each other. then you would experience laughter meditation.

addthree
11-20-13, 12:23 PM
Sarek. Do you know about Transcendental Mediation? Better known as TM. This is a really good one. It will clear your mind and stop your thoughts for a bit. TM is one of the most refined meditations and very easy to master. Yes everyone can meditate it just takes will to practice. It takes years of mindfulness mediation to equal what you can do with one month of TM.

sarek
11-20-13, 02:50 PM
Sarek. Do you know about Transcendental Mediation? Better known as TM. This is a really good one. It will clear your mind and stop your thoughts for a bit. TM is one of the most refined meditations and very easy to master. Yes everyone can meditate it just takes will to practice. It takes years of mindfulness mediation to equal what you can do with one month of TM.

I am aware of the existence of TM and it will likely produce usable results, if something similar to mindfulness is specifically sought. However, for my specific purpose of profound self analysis and self discovery the "daily life' approach works fbetter as I can keep track of what my mental systems are doing as they are doing it. It provides real time analysis.

It lets me instantly see when I am stressed or uptight, when i am in a hurry or when I am being negative. I can go about daily life as I am doing this and not miss a beat.
In fact, thanks to the substantial energy savings it has helped me achieve, it is much easier to get through the day. It takes much longer for me to run out of 'spoons'

And whereas the secular benefits of awareness are more than remarkable, they are not fundamentally the reason why these methods have come into existence. The primary reason I have chosen this method over others is not a secular reason.

sarek
11-21-13, 03:24 AM
Please forgive the back to back posting, which is a bit of a sin in forumland. But I think it could be helpful if I speak about my own very first experiments with self awareness.

After I had read some of the written material I decided it was time to test it out for real.

The first area where I succeeded an achieving something real was in my car, in traffic.
Over the past 15 or so years I had been gradually building up a tremendous amount or road rage and road stress. I would never act it out in any way outside my car, but inside my car I have cursed often enough to write an alternative dictionary.
Everyone and everything became the much hated enemy. Bumperstickers, slowcoaches, cops, traffic lights(which were, of course, maliciously programmed to go red in front of my nose), road works. All of it annoyed me and set me off.

So I set out to 'catch my thoughts' And the first time I succeeded in doing that it was quite remarkable. I could actually "see" the impulsive anger as it was coming up, and merely the act of observing it made it vanish in an instant.
I have had my worse days, but this alone has cut my road stress by about 90%.

Since then I have extended the practice to as many aspects of daily life I could find.
It has made it much easier to get through a working day at the office because self observation has allowed me to identify all the little signs of stress onset. Especially the body keeps building up so much stress and tension that I was previously not even aware off.

Another major change is that its done miracles for my prejudices. Of course, before I started this I had no idea I actually had any prejudices and no, I wasn't judgemental either. Others were judgemental, not me.

I found out soon enough that self awareness is a beast. It absolutely does not pull punches. It showed me myself without mercy.
And of course I had tons of prejudices and I was very judgemental. I would go around all day judging NT people, difficult clients, politicians. You name it, i judged it.

Self awareness has helped me recognise those instances and in so doing take a step back and re evaluate what I was doing.

The process of self discovery is quite ruthless. The bottom line in the practice I am following is that no matter what nasty thoughts I might have it is always my fault. This approach, while at first seeming quite odd, is sensible.
I can not change anyone else. I can not shape the world to my liking and it will keep doing what it does. Even my own body and mind, ADD and all, will keep screwing up my life. I can not change any of that, I can only attempt to change my own valuation of everything that is happening.

What I did find is that its important to link the practice of self awareness with a thorough understanding of a great number of physical, psychological and even linguistic details.
Once I got to the more difficult and complex personal 'vices' it has become very important to be able to identify what they are and where they might be hiding. Often enough, a vice can hide itself quite well or it can even masquerade as a virtue. And what's more, most of the time I don't even know what the heck I am doing.

ginniebean
11-21-13, 04:12 AM
Sarek, beautifully said. Awesome post!

daveddd
11-21-13, 07:13 AM
sarek

i understand what you mean and have recently used a similiar method in daily use

i was really behind in my work and feeling incredibly anxious, so the work in front of me was suffering

then i did like you and let the worry come and go, and just focused on what was in front of me

world of difference

its incredible


just one brief page on adhd emotion regulation and mindfulness to share (non spiritual)

http://books.google.com/books?id=llw470lSDAcC&pg=PA325&dq=mindfulness+emotion+regulation+adhd&hl=en&sa=X&ei=b-mNUr3WLeTWyQG0lYCwDA&ved=0CEoQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=mindfulness%20emotion%20regulation%20adhd&f=false

Corina86
11-21-13, 12:12 PM
Thanks, Sayek!

I've been doing this for years without even knowing it apparently :)

My favorite is being in a swing or a rocking chair and looking at a beautiful landscape and listening to music... it's just bliss :)

someothertime
11-22-13, 12:10 PM
Isubstantial energy savings it has helped me achieve, it is much easier to get through the day.

So true. The other day I was hanging washing on my line. Rushing... repeating some frustrated backing track in the noggin...

I stopped.... said to myself...... no....... now and only now....

Slowed right down..... just pegs and clothes.... no attempt to work fast..... just observe every little step...... smoothly and effortlessly.....

Three items of clothing later I had a huge smile on my face ..... it was wonderful!!!

The odd thing...... slowing down actually sped it up :confused:

meadd823
11-24-13, 03:59 AM
The process of self discovery is quite ruthless. The bottom line in the practice I am following is that no matter what nasty thoughts I might have it is always my fault. This approach, while at first seeming quite odd, is sensible.

I can not change anyone else. I can not shape the world to my liking and it will keep doing what it does. Even my own body and mind, ADD and all, will keep screwing up my life. I can not change any of that, I can only attempt to change my own valuation of everything that is happening.

:goodpost:


An eye opener for me was when I was asked to list ten traits I hated in others then instructed to see them within myself - have to say that it did suck but it does have a positive impact in a weird sort of way. . . It became impossible for me to dislike some one without seeing some aspect myself in them.

meadd823
11-24-13, 05:13 AM
I've said this before and I'll say it again. NO ONE can't meditate. Will the act of meditation be an extremely difficult and aggravating experience for some? Yes, definitely. But that still doesn't mean you can't meditate.

Attempting to meditate, no matter how poorly, is meditating.

Meditation is not the act of "clearing your mind". If you are under that impression, you are misinformed.

Meditation is the act of learning to observe your mind, and learning to direct your mind (say towards the breath). Yes, the time where your mind is wandering is not meditating. Meditation is when you notice your mind wandering and redirect your focus back to the object of meditation (usually the breath), or when you are focused.

No one will be focused all the time. Every one will notice themselves drift, often. If you notice the drift, that's meditation.

Yes, it sucks and it's stupidly boring and I HATE meditating. I feel the same way about eating vegetables. But both are very good for me, so I do them both anyway. No one said meditation would be pleasurable.

But the observation that attempting physical activities in a mindful way (walking, washing dishes, raking leaves) is a good way for the very restless to meditate without hating it is a very good point.

And, the action itself IS actually the object of meditation:

When you learn to do a sitting meditation, your object of focus is the breath. When you do a walking meditation, your object of focus is the lifting and placing of your feet. When you meditate while raking leaves, the object of focus is how your hands move the rake.

The activity itself is actually the meditation.

Another good technique for those who find meditation difficult and frustrating is using guided audio meditations.

Whoa hold on just a minute . . .


Please do not correct her or claim she is doing this incorrectly as you may in your good intent be denying her of a natural part of herself that she may find more useful than meditating.

Regardless of whether Amtram is technically meditating she is reaching a form of altered state of consciousness which in and of itself can be very useful and should not be discouraged in any way especially if she uses it with an intent and that intent is served.




If one wants to get technical about it judging by her description she is accessing the gateway to shamanic journeying which is what I use and effectively so.



I do not use physical awareness or meditation to reach an altered state either although some do so learning to do both is not only possible but encouraged. I do not find meditation much help in my spiritual practice but it can be most beneficial when it comes to daily emotional responses when journeying is not practical. . .


A lot of left brained types have a natural ability for some reason. One of my mentors is an accountant, my soul sister is a M.D. Belief in a deity is not required and much of the shamanic reference can be seen as archetypes by the devote atheist just as a Christians can use christian references to describe their experiences. . . .shamanic journeying is not a religious practice but a way of altering your state of consciousness to reach a higher level of understanding . . . . Some see it as increased self awareness or increasing a spiritual one . . . . the reference choice is a personal one.

ana futura
11-25-13, 05:11 PM
Please do not correct her or claim she is doing this incorrectly as you may in your good intent be denying her of a natural part of herself that she may find more useful than meditating.


Meadd, my intent with that post was to point out that the idea that certain people can't meditate is false.

Yes, it might not be the right path for someone. But Amtram said (as she has said several times) that she can't meditate.

Anyone can meditate. It might not be pleasant, and it might not be as fruitful as another activity, but anyone can meditate.

I did not say she was meditating incorrectly. She is meditating, she just doesn't have the right tools to frame the experience so that it will be fruitful. She doesn't even have the tools to see that she is meditating- that is the fault of those who have informed her about meditation. The people who have lead her to believe that a busy mind means that one is not meditating are the ones who are "doing it wrong", not her.

Maybe it will never be fruitful for her. That still doesn't mean that she "can't" meditate. Maybe her time would be better spent elsewhere (such as practicing mindfulness while sweeping), I don't disagree with that.

The idea that certain people "can't" meditate is extremely harmful, end of story. That idea (and the belief that meditation equals a clear mind) got in the way of my practice for many years, and I don't want it to get in the way of others here as well. The "barking beagles" are an inevitable part of meditation for many, and their presence does not indicate that one has "failed at meditation".

ana futura
11-25-13, 05:16 PM
Regardless of whether Amtram is technically meditating she is reaching a form of altered state of consciousness which in and of itself can be very useful and should not be discouraged in any way especially if she uses it with an intent and that intent is served.

It sounded to me that Amtram was stating that she cannot access this state- therefore she "can't" meditate.

I'm pointing out that meditation does not require one to access that state, or any state.

I do not disagree that moving meditations like she describes are also meditations, and they are probably a better fit for her than sitting meditation.

meadd823
11-27-13, 05:00 AM
The idea that certain people "can't" meditate is extremely harmful, end of story. That idea (and the belief that meditation equals a clear mind) got in the way of my practice for many years, and I don't want it to get in the way of others here as well. The "barking beagles" are an inevitable part of meditation for many, and their presence does not indicate that one has "failed at meditation".

Yes I did read it as you correcting Amtram so thanks for clarifying your message and intent. I always appreciate a polite correction when I misunderstand some thing.

excelsior
03-01-14, 05:02 PM
Try doing something with your hands-something simple like bouncing a ball. No effort. no thought. Bounce. Bounce. Bouncy-bounce-bounce-bounce. You can put together a puzzle, do the dishes but the KEY is-No thought. No effort. I got the idea from an episode of Star Trek Voyager. Tuvok plays a game called kal-toh. If you can get a kal-toh ball; on amazon, e-bay or a from a trekker, that's great! Actually, it's not a ball. it's a MASS you have to shape INTO a ball.

anonymouslyadd
12-22-14, 08:20 PM
I hope I can learn this behavior. I'm fighting it. I don't know. Maybe I need to call "focusing" something different, because I can only pay attention for a few seconds before my mind wanders.

anonymouslyadd
01-09-15, 04:24 PM
Yes Amtram, you are right. Its quite possible to see the conscious pursuit of an activity as a form of meditation.
The key to making this work lies in the word conscious. Meditation and self awareness are conscious activities. The second your actions become automatic, they lose all meditative value and fall back into the realm of mechanical man.

The Japanese have a particular approach to this type of awareness through activity. They use the term do (way) for it. This entails developing an activity, no matter what it is, to absolute perfection.

Again, I need to stress that whatever mode one uses, the essence is in doing what you do in a conscious, a non mechanical way. If the action is taken over by muscular memory, it loses its value.
With my job I have to use an Ipad, and I find that I end up mindlessly pushing buttons even when I shouldn't be pushing them.:o It's a real pain and causing me trouble. I think I'm causing my own software problems with the program we use. I'll try to hit a button and miss the mark a bit. Then, I'll have to hit it again. It's almost like I'm aiming at a bulls eye with my eyes closed, except it's not my mind closed. It's my eyes.

Jongeman
01-15-15, 04:35 PM
Dudes, about meditation and ADHD/ADD, TRY IT.

Is working wonders for me. And if you have this urge to stop it, or get up, get very fidgety or restless, GO THROUGH IT! Try to beat the urge, try keeping still, try to keep breathing deep and slow with your abdomen.

Perhaps you'll get the cold sweat, perhaps your heart starts racing, perhaps your legs hurt as hell, but if you make it, if you break through that barrier, all of a sudden you'll become really calm. Congratulations. You're life will be a little calmer, easier, clearer from then on -FOREVER! I think. Or at least for several months ^_^. It's hard for the brain to de-learn. Like if you master riding a bike once, you'll probably never de-learn it. You'll probably be able to do it after 10 years, though you didn't ride it for 10 years.

Anyway back to my point. Sit still! Breathe deep with your abdomen, and let this unrest reach it climax, let it explode in you, let it drive you crazy, but KEEP GOING! LET IT DRIVE YOU CRAZY AND THEN! woosh. It dissappears, and you become really calm.

You forced your brain to listen to your will power. And you're not hurting your body. Although your legs might hurt like hell, they will not become paralyzed or anything. You can sit still for 5 hours with nothing damaging happening don't worry.

But sit through the pain, sit through this unrest. Don't fidget, try to distance yourself from your thoughts, dont worry if it doesn't work.

But the most important thing is:
-Keep breathing deep and slow with the abdomen
-Sit still

Once you go through this barrier, you have conquered a lot!

I encourage all ADHD/ADD to try it. This way you'll master this restlesness BIG TIME which is haunting you/us.

Hasta la vista!

(usually the climax is at about 45 minutes (yup, that's long ^_^ but it's worth it don't worry haha))

anonymouslyadd
02-23-15, 08:33 PM
Does this ever get easier? I'm having a hard time sticking to some of the advice here. Frustrating.

Unmanagable
02-24-15, 02:13 AM
Does this ever get easier? I'm having a hard time sticking to some of the advice here. Frustrating.

It's become more natural to me to want to do it, and to follow through with it more often, but I'm not sure I'd call it "easier". Describe your current meditation practice. What tools do you use besides the advice here?

anonymouslyadd
02-24-15, 10:04 AM
It's become more natural to me to want to do it, and to follow through with it more often, but I'm not sure I'd call it "easier". Describe your current meditation practice. What tools do you use besides the advice here?
None.

Unmanagable
02-24-15, 04:30 PM
Perhaps seeking local community meditation gigs open to the public, or even searching online for the areas that most interest you, and try out a few different ways to find the way that best resonates with you could be helpful. Sorry you're having difficulty reaching a comfortable place with it. It really is helpful once you get there.

I found it isn't something that automatically creates a great amount of clarity when it's sporadically attempted, though. That's why I referred to it as a "practice". I found it easier to initially do with others, to learn the various basics and gain confidence, then moved on with personalizing it more to suit my needs and just practice on my own. I attend random community events now to give me the feeling of unity and to continue to build confidence amd make meaningful connections with like-minded peeps.

I'm also aware of others who have reached a satisfactory and helpful level of mindfulness via reading books and researching online about it without exposing themselves to practicing with others, so it can be absorbed in many ways, just depending on how you learn best.

Sometimes it just takes longer to make the connection with what mindfulness/meditation really is vs. what we think it is. I think it took me longer because I initially thought it was a bunch of BS and my mind wouldn't open to it being truly effective for anything, even when I tried to forcefully prompt my brain to go ahead and accept it already so I could move on with all this healing crap.

anonymouslyadd
02-24-15, 10:28 PM
Perhaps seeking local community meditation gigs open to the public, or even searching online for the areas that most interest you, and try out a few different ways to find the way that best resonates with you could be helpful. Sorry you're having difficulty reaching a comfortable place with it. It really is helpful once you get there.

I found it isn't something that automatically creates a great amount of clarity when it's sporadically attempted, though. That's why I referred to it as a "practice". I found it easier to initially do with others, to learn the various basics and gain confidence, then moved on with personalizing it more to suit my needs and just practice on my own. I attend random community events now to give me the feeling of unity and to continue to build confidence amd make meaningful connections with like-minded peeps.

I'm also aware of others who have reached a satisfactory and helpful level of mindfulness via reading books and researching online about it without exposing themselves to practicing with others, so it can be absorbed in many ways, just depending on how you learn best.

Sometimes it just takes longer to make the connection with what mindfulness/meditation really is vs. what we think it is. I think it took me longer because I initially thought it was a bunch of BS and my mind wouldn't open to it being truly effective for anything, even when I tried to forcefully prompt my brain to go ahead and accept it already so I could move on with all this healing crap.
I was afraid of this being more of an investment than reading off a few note cards. It definitely seems like something that needs to be practiced. Ugh...

sarek
02-25-15, 06:52 AM
I was afraid of this being more of an investment than reading off a few note cards. It definitely seems like something that needs to be practiced. Ugh...

Meditation is a conscious lifestyle choice, not something that you can simply "tack on" to life.

Meditation is also one of the main gateways to our own personal conscious evolution as a being. If you desire true personal growth, there is very little that is more effective than consciously working on yourself by means of meditation and other tools.

If you want a better understanding of the place of meditation in personal growth it would be best if you looked into the works of one of the modern teachers like Eckhart Tollle, Adyashanti or Krishnamurti or whomever else whose approach suits you best.

meadd823
03-02-15, 10:05 AM
I find group accountability at least in the beginning to be one way of getting myself to stick to some thing long enough for it to become "habit forming" - Meditation however is not restricted to Buddhist. Just thought I would throw those thoughts out there.

anonymouslyadd
03-15-15, 04:58 PM
I've noticed some progress with my mindfulness practice. I like some of the exercises I've read about, because they provide me with something to do, taking action instead of the traditional inaction I've read about.

I've begun using some of the principles I've been reading about and applying them to daily life. When I begin to feel anxious or my brain is moving too fast, I close my eyes and count to ten. This works amazingly well. I've also begun to view activities in slow motion, which is also beginning to bear fruit.

My most difficult times to be mindful are while driving or walking, both activities offering little stimulation. Does anyone have any tips on dealing with driving and walking? Thanks!

Little Missy
03-15-15, 09:27 PM
My most difficult times to be mindful are while driving or walking, both activities offering little stimulation. Does anyone have any tips on dealing with driving and walking? Thanks!

Music! It feeds the soul.:)

Unmanagable
03-15-15, 11:12 PM
Music, very interesting books on cd, and/or breathing exercises when I'm driving. The breathing squashes the road rage feelings much faster than the others.

Checking out the often overlooked details along the way during a walk, when I have time, otherwise, rhythmic steps as I listen to the music in my head, rhyming to myself, talking to the animals along the way, and perfecting my plan of action in my brain for once I get to wherever I'm going.

anonymouslyadd
06-12-15, 04:52 PM
I'm finding that in order to calm myself I can't be around the ckmputer or anything. Its too tempting for me to start using it again. I think I need to totally separate myself from the stimulus.

I've noticed some small successes with my practice but know that I can't be complacent with the successes.

sarek
06-13-15, 11:25 AM
Here is an extremely powerful, albeit long, talk by Matt Kahn about the importance of relaxing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE7JvVRDgnc

anonymouslyadd
11-24-15, 02:54 AM
I just tried the technique, where you focus on an object. I felt a little more relaxed afterward.

It feels like I'm failing because I struggle so much. I just read that the purpose of mindfulness isn't to be a good practitioner.

sarek
11-24-15, 03:26 AM
I just tried the technique, where you focus on an object. I felt a little more relaxed afterward.

It feels like I'm failing because I struggle so much. I just read that the purpose of mindfulness isn't to be a good practitioner.

That's right. You can not fail. Its normal to struggle with trying too hard though, I have had the same experience.

anonymouslyadd
11-27-15, 01:23 AM
I just realized my tendency to shirk from challenges. I don't do it all the time, though.