View Full Version : Do I have Autism/Asperger's?


eclectic beagle
12-14-13, 06:19 PM
This is more of a suspicion I've been having lately, and the psychologist I did see ruled it out as a diagnosis. Based off of my posts here, does it seem like I have autism/ or a form of social impairment? I understand I'm inviting criticism here, but was thinking it might help me see things more clearly.

daveddd
12-14-13, 06:50 PM
don't you have bad social anxiety?

eclectic beagle
12-14-13, 06:52 PM
don't you have bad social anxiety?

I do, just wondering if that's a reflection of another social impairment. Dunno, I've had superficial friendships in the past, but they were pretty transitory and my social life now is pretty nonexistent. Which could simply be a side-effect of the social anxiety. It's hard to say, and I think it's equally difficult for someone to be 100% objective about himself/herself.

daveddd
12-14-13, 06:56 PM
thats a real thin line with a lot of us

i would probably meet the criteria for a PDD

but a lot of my autistic type traits didn't start till around my early teenage years

probably pointing to an avoidant type personality disorder

hows your emotional intelligence

eclectic beagle
12-14-13, 07:01 PM
Hmm, I do have one skype friend, but it's limited to instant messaging.

Emotional intelligence is decent, by my estimation. Except I probably display my insecurity far too often, but I don't think I'm blind to the consequences of that. I would definitely agree I have an avoidant personality disorder. It might be at the root of things.

daveddd
12-14-13, 07:07 PM
there is probably a whole lot of crossover in the avoidant/adhd/aspergers area

most likely rooted in problems with emotional intelligence/ and regulation

daveddd
12-14-13, 07:08 PM
maybe even an emotional / emotional exposure phobia

eclectic beagle
12-14-13, 07:14 PM
there is probably a whole lot of crossover in the avoidant/adhd/aspergers area

most likely rooted in problems with emotional intelligence/ and regulation

Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me if severe forms of adhd have social results similar to asperger's. What's the point in recognizing something is socially inappropriate to say, if you blurt it out due to lack of impulse control?

silivrentoliel
12-14-13, 07:17 PM
Mental, I've thought the same of myself... it's so hard to tell online though.

daveddd
12-14-13, 07:18 PM
Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me if severe forms of adhd have social results similar to asperger's. What's the point in recognizing something is socially inappropriate to say, if you blurt it out due to lack of impulse control?

thomas brown thinks so


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=thomas%20brown%20top%20down%20emotion%20regulati on%20adhd&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDQQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.adhd.is%2Fstatic%2Ffiles%2Fgr einasafn%2Fglaerur_Tok_a_tilveru%2F20.ppt&ei=P6KCUv6ZD4-E2wX7qID4BA&usg=AFQjCNHcXYFfPh0dKEAYzSFYBVa1UxM2Xg&sig2=hW0rnWvVP75XDMBWv26FMw


good question on the impulse control, its hard to say if my social skills are bad per se ... or my idiotic blurting is the bigger issue

eclectic beagle
12-14-13, 07:20 PM
Mental, I've thought the same of myself... it's so hard to tell online though.

That's true, forums are limited in that context.

thomas brown thinks so


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=thomas%20brown%20top%20down%20emotion%20regulati on%20adhd&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDQQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.adhd.is%2Fstatic%2Ffiles%2Fgr einasafn%2Fglaerur_Tok_a_tilveru%2F20.ppt&ei=P6KCUv6ZD4-E2wX7qID4BA&usg=AFQjCNHcXYFfPh0dKEAYzSFYBVa1UxM2Xg&sig2=hW0rnWvVP75XDMBWv26FMw


good question on the impulse control, its hard to say if my social skills are bad per se ... or my idiotic blurting is the bigger issue

Same here. And, I'll have to check out that link in a bit. Looks interesting.

janiew
12-15-13, 12:32 AM
Couldn't say, don't know you well enough.

I think we will find eventually that ADHD is on the autism spectrum. I'm pretty Asperger-y. Geek with special interests that tend to change over time. I have social anxiety in a lot of cases, along with sensory issues.

I was lucky to find gainful work suited to me that's always changing and it's mainly black and white with a little gray if you know what you're doing, have become an expert in my field, and do perform better professionally than socially - never felt like a "normal" female though I am in many ways.

I had some "special interests" as a kid. For instance starting in 3rd grade, I collected a ton of 45 singles and albums - lol, vinyl! I memorized every record I had to include the lyrics, the writers of lyrics and music, the label, and the year - and I arranged them in a particular order.

Then I discovered politics when I watched the 1976 presidential debates and elections in 6th grade - I was a Ford girl and have changed affiliation since then. Anyway, I have followed politics and current events in a major way ever since.

Anyway, I've always been a little "different/special." I made friends and had an active social life through college and then it tapered off. Hard to say how much of that is my special-ness vs. my rheumatoid arthritis which has basically turned my life into survival where working was about the best I could do.

Anyway, I don't know how to tell the difference honestly. One of my counselors thought I was on the spectrum. The other didn't. My pdoc diagnosed ADHD and OCD. Figure it's all related.

Don't know if official diagnosis is necessary if you accept who you are.

Sorry, long post but it's something that's been on my mind a lot lately as I delve deeper to understand myself.

eclectic beagle
12-16-13, 07:36 PM
thomas brown thinks so


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=thomas%20brown%20top%20down%20emotion%20regulati on%20adhd&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDQQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.adhd.is%2Fstatic%2Ffiles%2Fgr einasafn%2Fglaerur_Tok_a_tilveru%2F20.ppt&ei=P6KCUv6ZD4-E2wX7qID4BA&usg=AFQjCNHcXYFfPh0dKEAYzSFYBVa1UxM2Xg&sig2=hW0rnWvVP75XDMBWv26FMw


good question on the impulse control, its hard to say if my social skills are bad per se ... or my idiotic blurting is the bigger issue

I liked that one point "each person is more vulnerable to a particular emotion". And, the bit about emotional significance being assigned without conscious thought. Also, does the new DSM include emotional dysregulation in its criteria?

daveddd
12-17-13, 09:15 AM
I liked that one point "each person is more vulnerable to a particular emotion". And, the bit about emotional significance being assigned without conscious thought. Also, does the new DSM include emotional dysregulation in its criteria?

no it is not

still just the secondary symptoms like inattention and hyperactivity

Corina86
12-17-13, 12:12 PM
I don't think you necessarily require a diagnosis for this, since neither social anxiety, Asperger's or avoidant personality disorder don't have a treatment, other than therapy. You might one or several besides ADHD. I think you should try to find a good therapist which can help you overcome your own issues, whatever they are classified as.

eclectic beagle
12-17-13, 01:11 PM
no it is not

still just the secondary symptoms like inattention and hyperactivity

That's a shame.

I don't think you necessarily require a diagnosis for this, since neither social anxiety, Asperger's or avoidant personality disorder don't have a treatment, other than therapy. You might one or several besides ADHD. I think you should try to find a good therapist which can help you overcome your own issues, whatever they are classified as.

I've already been to a psychologist, he ruled out Asperger's/Autism. Guess my prior point was it's sort of difficult to distinguish between social deficits stemming from ADHD from Autism social deficits. At least, from what I know.

daveddd
12-17-13, 01:38 PM
That's a shame.



I've already been to a psychologist, he ruled out Asperger's/Autism. Guess my prior point was it's sort of difficult to distinguish between social deficits stemming from ADHD from Autism social deficits. At least, from what I know.

a very high percentage of ADHD cases have problems with emotional regulation , so I'm not sure why its not in the dsm

that leads to a wide array of other varying issues

its important to understand how they link, and why they occur

I've always related to your posts, so i recommend you look into insight mindfulness

just poke around a bit , read the research and what it is your correcting is how i started off

it started making more and more sense , then the results of limited time with it were shocking, in the social areas

http://books.google.com/books?id=llw470lSDAcC&pg=PA325&dq=emotional+regulation+mindfulness+adhd&hl=en&sa=X&ei=4ouwUvfsKYrqyQH98YDgDg&ved=0CD8Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=emotional%20regulation%20mindfulness%20adhd&f=false


a brief summary of scientific reasons it works

eclectic beagle
12-18-13, 08:08 PM
a very high percentage of ADHD cases have problems with emotional regulation , so I'm not sure why its not in the dsm

that leads to a wide array of other varying issues

its important to understand how they link, and why they occur

I've always related to your posts, so i recommend you look into insight mindfulness

just poke around a bit , read the research and what it is your correcting is how i started off

it started making more and more sense , then the results of limited time with it were shocking, in the social areas

http://books.google.com/books?id=llw470lSDAcC&pg=PA325&dq=emotional+regulation+mindfulness+adhd&hl=en&sa=X&ei=4ouwUvfsKYrqyQH98YDgDg&ved=0CD8Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=emotional%20regulation%20mindfulness%20adhd&f=false


a brief summary of scientific reasons it works

I often wonder if emotional dysregulation is at the "core" of the disorder.

I can honestly say I've related to many of your posts on here, it's hard not to be somewhat alike on this forum.

Been reading up on epigenetics lately, and its implications for adhd. You're right, I need to delve into the research more.