View Full Version : Hypothyroid/ADD


ReyneeDay
12-23-13, 04:34 PM
Wasn't sure where to post this, but I have been doing a lot of looking up of things lately. I found out about 4-5 years ago that I am hypothyroid. I was diagnosed earlier this year with ADD. I have found info that says hypothyroid can be misdiagnosed as ADD, also found info that hypothyroid patients can also have ADD, and that there is a connection between the two. I am not exactly sure which one I believe. I do know that my thyroid medication has never balanced me out completely. Docs say that my dosage of levothyroxin has my TSH with "normal" ranges, but I still don't feel right. Since I've been on ADD meds as well, I do feel more "normal", but still have some of the physical symptoms of the hypothyroid. I was kind of surprised not to see a specific topic for Hypothyroid/ADD co-conditions. So I guess my question is how many others also have hypothyroid? And do you believe they are connected? or that you may be misdiagnosed?

dvdnvwls
12-23-13, 04:54 PM
There is a vague connection in that these two things can sort of look a little bit like each other, but I don't think there's a genetic or co-morbid situation, is there?

Assuming from your name that you're female - if so, also make sure to get your iron level checked. Thyroid replacement is known to mess with iron levels, and anemia is another problem you don't want, and which also causes tiredness and inability to do things. Getting tested for anemia is a simple blood test. Eating red meat is safer and healthier than taking iron supplements; but if your iron was dangerously low then a doctor might feel it was best to use supplements to get things back into a safe range first. If you are a vegetarian with anemia, you may end up having to sacrifice your vegetarianism in order to have the healthiest outcome.

Allegra113
12-25-13, 07:00 PM
I was dx adhd before thyroid issues. Had thyroid cancer and everything removed. Now I'm hyperthyroid. ADHD symptoms much worse the past few years, but my drs have determined the ADHD is separate from the thyroid. Not sure which was really first though.

datajunkie
03-08-14, 11:34 AM
Just found this via search engine looking for info on hypo T and ad/hd meds.
I was dx'd hypo T a year ago. NDT medication, natural dessicated thyroid, brand name armour. had helped a lot. This type of med works better for quite a few people compared to synthetic type you are on. That usually only has T4, the storage form and the body uses T3. not everyone converts well.
a web site called stop the thyroid madness and book of that name are good sources of what to test for--many docs still use old tests that are not that useful and treat to remission of symptoms not just results as normal or even high normal is not enough for some people to be optimal. just as response to AD/HD meds varies greatly.
the reason I was looking for hyp T and meds, is a few comments about meds making people feel hot, sweat or feverish. I have noticed that since being on my meds, only a few weeks, started with low does ritalin, the muscle tension and jitters enough to have me try adderall--smoother but perhaps not as effective at getting things done, but either one seems to increase my cold tolerance. the amino acid tyrosine is a precursor to norepinephrine and also seems to boost thyroid function. there may be a direct link to thyroid function and AD/HD meds working on the same neurotransmitters that influence the thyroid. and cortisol is needed for thyroid hormones to function well. cortisol and adrenaline are made from norepinephrine. my AD/HD symptoms were much worse when cortisol was low as were my hypo t symptoms. getting cortisol and hypo T improved reduced AD/HD symptoms. perhaps both issues needed enough cortisol that my body was stealing from my already low NE. Now that meds are boosting that, perhaps my adrenals and thyroid are working better also. I may get my thyroid levels checked again once my meds are stable. if I show signs of going hyper T I'll lower my thyroid dose immediately and call my doc.
everything connected to everything else?

OhLookABunny
09-19-14, 12:31 AM
Glad this thread is here and hope it's not too late to jump in on it. I am going through adjustments of my levothyroxine dosage this year. Backstory - in 2009 I was adjusting to having had a hysterectomy in 2008 at age 46, and going directly into menopause because of it. I had also been taking Metformin for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) to supposedly prevent Type II Diabetes that often accompanies PCOS, according to the doctor I saw in '08.

In '09, I was going to a low-income clinic - they were good doctors there who volunteered their time. I was feeling very sluggish on .137 levothyroxine tablets and for awhile the blood test reflected that and I was put on .150s. I loved the energy they gave me. :yes: However, I did notice some heart palpitations and the blood test the next time showed that dose was too high. But I told them how sluggish I'd felt before. So they figured out I could take an in-between dose - a .100 pill and half of a .88 pill for a total of .144. Also I had been gaining weight from the Metformin and since my blood sugar was OK they let me discontinue it and I was able to lose that weight - 15-20 lbs., though I still have other weight I need to lose. I've been doing that for 5 years.

But now I have a new doctor and the blood test results were saying I was getting too much thyroid at .144. For awhile, due to my explanation of what happened in the past, she let me stay on .144. But then she said it wasn't good to do that, I could get osteoporosis. So she lowered it to .125 (I thought she was just going to go down to .137! :eek:) and said come back for another check. Well, I did a week or so ago, and now it's getting lowered to .100! I did adapt to the .125 after a few days of feeling tired . . . but I wonder. :scratch:

Now I did ask the doctor about what other things might be making me tired and she mentioned Vitamin D, which I have had low levels of in the past. Especially in wintertime when days are short and I'm indoors more. So I'm going to resume that supplementation a little.

Right now, it's just a wait-and-see game. The ADD is worse if my energy is low - anything that is not optimal in some other health area affects me there - if only just because it's another distraction. I'm hoping we'll get this thyroid business settled. I have tried about every doctor I've ever gone to about the T3 vs. T4 question and they dismiss it. I wonder if I could be one of those who don't make T3 properly. :umm1:

datajunkie
09-19-14, 10:07 AM
check out the site and book stop the thyroid madness the only book written by a lay person on a health subject I've ever recommended but this author did a lot of homework and lists her real deal medical sources like pubmed. there is a list of cofactors, tests to determine what might be off and if you convert T4 to T3 or RT3.
and cortisol/adrenal issues are part of this also. some good info on adrenal support

Laserbeak
09-20-14, 05:03 AM
I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when I was like a preteen, but since then I've seemed to have grown out of it. All then blood tests since I've been an adult seem to come back normal for thyroxin even though I haven't taken a Synthroid for years and years. I wasn't any other regular prescription medication at the time either.

My mother had hyperthyroidism and was given radioactive iodine to kill off part of her thyroid but they gave her too much out and now she's hypothyroid, so she still takes a pill everyday for that. I believe she was still nursing me when she was given the radioactive iodine, but at the time they said it was OK, but she thinks that's what caused my problem. But it doesn't really explain why my natural thyroid levels have returned to normal.

:confused:

datajunkie
09-20-14, 02:21 PM
Adrenal issues along with others can prevent the thyroid from working properly. If you had something that slowed your adrenals for a while and then it cleared, that might be a reason that your thyroid was low and improved again.
I'm going back to rechecking my thyroid, adrenal and may have to check for insulin and cortisol resistance, possibly pituitary and hypothalamus function also. in women the FSH and LH hormones can affect things also that intertwine in a web of hormones that are giving me symptoms of hypoglycemia I wasn't aware were due to low glucose and some insulin resistance. and these 2 hormones can interact with thyroid, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone to trigger some of the insulin issues.
ARGH! head banging on keyboard. I'm glad I found out about this and am starting to track glucose along with blood pressure and heart rate and some symptoms of what I think are low cortisol or cortisol resistance like runny nose, over reaction to insect bites and a particular flavor of brain fog. I think some of what I thought part of ADD neurotransmitter issues have been due to glucose not getting where it needs to be at the time its needed.
I've spent most of my adult life trying to have the best diet I can, exercising regularly also for health and well being, and being as proactive as I can and still finding this out. Important to know, so I can head it off. but the oh no not again! not another round of note taking, symptom checking, diet monitoring, now checking for pollen, chemical exposure, mold exposure and such with the possibility I might have to take another med to compensate and prevent diabetes, heart disease and more.
with luck, if my adrenal and thyroid can be optimized the others will follow.

OhLookABunny
09-23-14, 01:00 PM
Adrenal issues along with others can prevent the thyroid from working properly. If you had something that slowed your adrenals for a while and then it cleared, that might be a reason that your thyroid was low and improved again.
I'm going back to rechecking my thyroid, adrenal and may have to check for insulin and cortisol resistance, possibly pituitary and hypothalamus function also. in women the FSH and LH hormones can affect things also that intertwine in a web of hormones that are giving me symptoms of hypoglycemia I wasn't aware were due to low glucose and some insulin resistance. and these 2 hormones can interact with thyroid, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone to trigger some of the insulin issues.
ARGH! head banging on keyboard. I'm glad I found out about this and am starting to track glucose along with blood pressure and heart rate and some symptoms of what I think are low cortisol or cortisol resistance like runny nose, over reaction to insect bites and a particular flavor of brain fog. I think some of what I thought part of ADD neurotransmitter issues have been due to glucose not getting where it needs to be at the time its needed.
I've spent most of my adult life trying to have the best diet I can, exercising regularly also for health and well being, and being as proactive as I can and still finding this out. Important to know, so I can head it off. but the oh no not again! not another round of note taking, symptom checking, diet monitoring, now checking for pollen, chemical exposure, mold exposure and such with the possibility I might have to take another med to compensate and prevent diabetes, heart disease and more.
with luck, if my adrenal and thyroid can be optimized the others will follow.

Interesting . . . I highlighted things that I have. I know I need to exercise and work on improving my diet. I'm at the point where I could probably get rid of the insulin resistance before it develops into something worse.

I seem to blow my nose more than other people, and I'm a mosquito magnet and my legs get scarred up to the point where other people notice and go "What happened to your legs?!" :eek: (I've made a resolution for next year to put anti-itch stuff on them immediately.) I need to learn more about cortisol because I know it's something our bodies need on the one hand, but stress (and I've certainly had plenty of that) can cause us to secrete too much of it, and that's behind belly fat - ugh - and other problems. I have anxiety disorders in addition to ADD so lots of things stress me and I reckon I secrete plenty of cortisol.

datajunkie
09-23-14, 01:39 PM
For me LOW cortisol is much worse than high. And like insulin resistance we can have cortisol and thyroid hormone resistance. Cortisol is needed for glucose uptake, not enough cortisol is one reason for hypoglycemia. And it is also part of the inflammation response. not enough C and I over react to the insect bites, welt up more and itch more and my nose runs more.
and low C may be part of my anxiety even though it seems counterintuitive. but when the adrenal glands are pooped and want a nap rather than making C, if blood sugar drops too far the panic button gets hit and adrenaline shoots out to force the adrenals into overdrive.
and there is another link, tyrosine is an amino acid precursor to norepinephrine and dopamine, which affect AD/HD, AND thyroid hormone AND cortisol and adrenaline. so all interrelated. and if there is a glitch somewhere or extra high demand for any one of these, there can be a deficit in the others. If one key ingredient is low in reserves, the body has to choose which systems get it. since we need glucose, it might put priority on cortisol at the expense of cutting supplies for thyroid, NE and DA and adrenaline may be low also. adrenaline can help drive DA into receptors, one reason many ADDers' are adrenaline junkies and if our NE or DA is low the ADD gets worse. and if thyroid is low NE and DA may not work properly either. it's a sticky spiderweb all connected together.

datajunkie
09-23-14, 06:50 PM
Check these out. I've not yet done my own cross checking on the sources. first one I think is from an association rather than company or internet guru. second one may be internet guru but had some things that caught my attention and want to check out further.
http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/2011/the-serotonin-connection/
http://www.alternativementalhealth.com/articles/hypoglycemia.htm
and do you have any signs of mitral valve prolapse syndrome? this doesn't mean you have a hear condition. it's a biomarker for other things that get passed along with some genes that may give a low grade murmur http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=site&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mitralvalveprolapse.com%2Fsym ptoms.html
http://www.ozemedicine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=dysautonomia

OhLookABunny
09-24-14, 09:38 AM
Check these out. I've not yet done my own cross checking on the sources. first one I think is from an association rather than company or internet guru. second one may be internet guru but had some things that caught my attention and want to check out further.
http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/2011/the-serotonin-connection/
http://www.alternativementalhealth.com/articles/hypoglycemia.htm
and do you have any signs of mitral valve prolapse syndrome? this doesn't mean you have a hear condition. it's a biomarker for other things that get passed along with some genes that may give a low grade murmur http://www.mitralvalveprolapse.com/symptoms.html
http://www.ozemedicine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=dysautonomia

The mitral valve one drew my attention right away - my mother had MVP, diagnosed around the age I am now. Though not all of the symptoms in that list fit me, some of them do.

I know I have some sort of blood sugar regulation problems - I get hungry sooner than others, and when my sugar bottoms out, I get grumpy and can't think well. My diet has been erratic and declining in quality (i.e. eating more junky food that for awhile I'd gotten away from, and having practically no appetite for vegetables, which as a picky eater, have always been a struggle anyway). In short, I know I need to improve my diet but it seems like this huge battle.

More later, I need to get started on the day - thanks for the links. :thankyou:

JJJJJJJJJJ
09-27-14, 11:46 PM
A few things come to mind as overlapping between thyroid and ADD. I imagine there are many more.

Tyrosine is used to make thyroid hormone and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

Iron is required for one of the catecholamine related enzymes and for cells to use thyroid hormone.

"Thyronamines are molecular derivatives of the thyroid hormone and are very important for endocrine system function. 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is the most potent TAAR1 agonist.." This (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TAAR1) will help to explain the connection.

I've heard that people with ADD tend to be low in zinc. I think zinc is somewhat involved in conversion of thyroid hormones.

Selenium is involved in conversion of T4 to T3. It warms my hands and helps with motivation. Se is also an antioxidant. It binds rather well with some heavy metals and so offers some protection. Some heavy metals are associated with ADD.

I agree with Datajunkie about checking out Stop the thyroid madness site for leads.

I would not rely entriely on TSH. Learn about Free T3, reverse T3.

You might check your temperatures--cf dr.rind's site

The supplement Thyroid Helper has been useful for over seven years for some of my symptoms that could be due to either or both hypothyroid and inattentive ADD. It includes tyrosine. Se, ashwaghanda, etc