View Full Version : any nicotine quitters here?


psychopathetic
12-24-13, 07:05 PM
Just wondering if there's anyone else here who's quit smoking/chewing?

I quit about 3 1/2 years ago (1,262 days!). Not 1 single puff! No relapses, no slips...nothing!
I quit cold turkey, though I had a mountain of support from a website called quitnet.com. I super hyperfocused on that site for about 3 weeks straight (I was CONSTANTLY posting there lol) and the support and love I received really carried me through!
I used quitnet for about 2 years into my quit before I kinda faded away from the site and no longer needed the constant support. The people on that site got me through some pretty tough times in my life though outside of my quit.
I think part of why I love these forums (ADDF) so much is because a lot of people here are kind and supportive and open just like they are over at quitnet. I love online communities like this so much! <3

If any of you have quit, shout out your stats and share what helped you to quit!

janiew
12-24-13, 08:47 PM
Yes, PP, I have quit smoking butts on various occasions throughout my life.

Still smoke on occasion.

Wellbutrin was good for me... Have not tried Chantix.

Personally, I like smoking 2 packs a week...

Sorry did I say that?

psychopathetic
12-24-13, 08:48 PM
Hey...it's a whole heck of a lot better then 2 packs of nasty sticks a day! :)

(((((((Janie!)))))))

Nicksgonefishin
12-24-13, 09:40 PM
Quitting again on the first. I'm all prepped for it.

phantasm
12-24-13, 10:58 PM
I smoked from the time I was 14 till 32. I tried to quit once, and do the social smoker thing, but that did NOT work.

About 1 year later I quit cold turkey, it was HARD but I never looked back. The hardest thing for me was the urge to smoke after a big meal. And holding it. I had to hold a straw or a pencil for a while just to get the psychological feeling.

I live in So Cal and people can treat you NASTY when you smoke outside of a building. So that helped make me quit even faster. I hated those evil looks.

Anywho, props to those that try or make it. It's one of the best things I have ever accomplished in my life.

psychopathetic
12-25-13, 02:46 AM
Quitting again on the first. I'm all prepped for it.

That is so awesome man! I'm super happy for you and I KNOW you can do this!
Don't be afraid to post on the forums more then usual when you first start your quit. I found posting on a forum (quitnet) to be an amazing distraction...and that's what my early quit was ALL about. Distracting myself from my cravings.
It's like we spend a huge portion of our day puffing on a nasty stick...then you quit and all the sudden you have all this free time. It was during that free time my cravings would kick in the hardest...so my biggest suggestion for your first 3 weeks, is to find lots of ways to distract yourself and to fill in that extra time.
Another thing I did a LOT of early on in my quit...was walking. I just paced back and forth in my living room, and I would walk pretty slowly. I wasn't in a race and I certainly wasn't walking to lose weight lol. I walked because it just really felt good, killed my cravings, and filled up lots of time.
I bet you'll be amazed at how quickly you'll be able to breath again! I noticed it within a week!

(((Hugs)))
Super proud of you man! This is the best gift you can give yourself!


=======

About 1 year later I quit cold turkey, it was HARD but I never looked back.

Yes :yes:

That's awesome! Well done and good for you :D!

I love being smoke free! <3

Fuzzy12
12-25-13, 05:24 AM
Psycho and phant that's brilliant. Nick best of luck.

I'm off cigs till the 2nd. I can do a week nicotine free if I knew that at some point I can smmoie again. Still... I'm craving one already.

I'd like to quit properly sometime next year. Thanks for the tip about the website. That sounds very helpful.

sarahsweets
12-25-13, 09:12 AM
I try and try everyday is a new day

sarahsweets
12-27-13, 07:48 AM
Thanks to Saleh I have managed to cut the actual smokes in half. Its slow going but Im working on it

psychopathetic
12-27-13, 09:19 AM
That's awesome :D

(((((((Sarah)))))))

Cheering for you!

jag2000
12-28-13, 11:33 AM
i keep trying to quit yet i seem to always go back. more for something to do while im at work. wife keeps on my A##@%$ on it about wasting $$$ killing myself. stinky clothing bad breath.

Unmanagable
12-28-13, 05:13 PM
I smoked for 22ish years. I tried multiple times with the patch, the gum, and wellbutrin with no luck. I finally decided to try cold turkey, seven years ago, and was able to do it. It was the hardest damn thing I've ever done (I was able to quit street drugs easier than nicotine), and I'm amazed that no one was harmed the first couple months. :) I was extremely b*****, gained some weight, and craved the he!! out of them.

I kept a picture of what someone with severe throat, mouth, and lung cancer looked like, along with the chart of the health improvements your body experiences hourly/daily/weekly/yearly in several places I frequented as motivation. I had to avoid places and people that had any hint of smoke. I still crave one occasionally, but once I'm around it, I can't stand it and the craving passes.

I think when the time is right for the individual, it can be done. It won't be easy, or even achieved, no matter the method, from my experiences, but it's one worth tackling whenever you can. Good luck to those trying to kick it's a**!

Fuzzy12
12-28-13, 06:10 PM
I haven't had a smoke since Tuesday. The cravings are not too bad but I do miss it and I'm so looking forward to when I can smoke again.

outdoorlovr
12-28-13, 06:50 PM
I didn't smoke that many cigarettes and didn't have a lot of trouble quitting. I did get headaches and flu symptoms when I quit almost 4 years ago. I have a few friends who struggled with quitting for a long time, and then did a free 12-step program called "Nicotine Anonymous" and were able to quit for good. I haven't tried it, but I heard from friends who did it that everybody they met who did the steps in Nicotine Anonymous managed to quit no matter how much trouble they had in the past.

EmilyRay42
12-28-13, 07:49 PM
All the times that I quit smoking and I am planning not to start again, I got down to just 5 or 6 cigarettes a day before stopping completely. I found that it helped reduce the irritability and cravings dramatically. It also shortened how long they continued after I stopped smoking.

Remember the cravings are like a wave, they rise gradually and peak then subside lasting fifteen to twenty minutes. Distraction with hard candies also helped me.

Emily

psychopathetic
12-28-13, 09:10 PM
I smoked for 22ish years. I tried multiple times with the patch, the gum, and wellbutrin with no luck. I finally decided to try cold turkey, seven years ago, and was able to do it.

Omg that is so amazing! Thank you for sharing this and HUGE congrats on your long term quit! So proud of you!!

I have a craving once in awhile too. I figure I'll have cravings for the rest of my life...but I can go months now without even thinking about smoking. I can even be around people who smoke and the thought of me smoking doesn't even cross my mind anymore.

psychopathetic
12-28-13, 09:35 PM
Quitting wasn't hard for me...don't get me wrong, I had to battle craves...they were CONSTANT for the first 3 weeks and as we all know cravings are absolutely misserable.
But I LOVED it! It was like a warrior was released in me and every crave I made it through just added to my ever growing list of battles I made it through. The more I battles I had under my belt the prouder I felt and the more the warrior inside of me would roar.

I am very fortunate for several reasons.

I haven't shared this here yet...but about 4 years ago I was diagnosed with testicular cancer. I was a very heavy smoker at the time (2+ packs a day at that point) and I was SO embarrassed about it. I had 2 doctors I was working with, and between the surgery I had as well as a dose of chemotherapy, I had met at least a dozen different nurses. I also had to be asked tons of questions about my health...and one question on every single questionnaire I had to fill out or answer was "Do you smoke?". Man did I hate myself for having to answer "Yes" on that one. I felt as if I gave myself my cancer by not taking better care of myself.


There was 2 events that happened during this time that really helped push me over into deciding I was done.

After having surgery to have my right testicle and tumor removed (the tumor was a little larger then a softball and had completely encased my testicle) one of the nurses was explaining to me that I needed to wait for the anesthesia to get out of my system before I smoked, or else I'd get sick. It was an outpaitiant surgery, so I got to go home right after the surgery was complete. As soon as my dad left the parking lot in his car I demanded for him to pull over so I could smoke. He refused so I opened the car door threatening to jump out (lol I was SO out of it!). He pulled over. I lit a smoke up. I got EXTREMELY sick to my stomach. I don't even know how to explain it. It was like I was made of playdoh and I was being pulled and stretched and twisted. I kept dry heaving which hurt like hell from the incision I had in my abdomen...but dam it, I needed a smoke. So I smoked that cigarette. I smoked it through the absolute sickness it was causing.
I didn't care. I "needed" that smoke!

The second event that really helped push me was when I was getting the chemo I needed. It was in a pretty small room, but it was filled with other people also recieving chemo. There was an older man there who had very sunkin in eyes and his skin was pale. I've never seen such sickly looking skin before and it made me so sad. I could tell this man must've been fighting cancer for a long time and the chemo was just destroying him.
There was an older woman who looked rather sad and wore a really pretty bandana on her hairless head. She had a friend there, and even though she looked so sad, she laughed a lot and I just loved her for it. How amazing she was to me. How strong!

And I was sitting there feeling stupid and guilty. I felt as if I had given myself my cancer in so many ways. And I wanted to smoke. I was in this room fighting cancer with others and I wanted to sneak out and smoke.

And I did. As soon as I was finished and the nurse unhooked me, I called my mom to come pick me up, and then I quietly left the clinic...snuck out behind a big green dumpster...and I lit up a smoke.
I felt like such an idiot, and I was SO afraid that one of the other chemo patients was going to see me...or even worse, one of the really sweet nurses.
I really hated myself in that moment. I really hated what I was doing.

It was within a month of the smoke behind that dumpster after receiving chemotherapy for cancer...it was then that I decided I was putting my foot down and quitting.

I'm a very stubborn person. I dug my heels into the ground and I was off.
Quitting came relatively easy for me.
But I was very lucky to have had such a situation to kick me in my *** like I did. It gave me that push I needed.

And I had quitnet.com. And that place was amazing! It was mainly women, and I felt like I was surrounded by aunts and grandmas. I loved it! I loved them! I still do! They gave me all the support in the world. And from day one they believed in me!
It was just amazing, and it was them that I really owe my quit to. I did quit cold turkey...but it's only because I had the amazing support that I received at quitnet.com.


So there's my story. Haven't shared it here at ADDForums yet, but it just felt right to do so tonight.

I quit and I haven't looked back. It was the single best thing I've done in many MANY years in my life.

psychopathetic
12-28-13, 09:42 PM
oh and just to get it out there...I did have a recurrence of cancer almost exactly 1 year later. It had spread into my abdomen and I had to go through 4 extremely intense months of chemotherapy (which was comprised of 32 spread out days of chemo infusions). It made me sicker then I've ever been in my life...but now that it's over with I love that I had to go through it. I have such a hard time explaining that to people. I hated chemo so badly and wanted it to be done. I would lay in my bed feeling so sick and distant from life just staring up at my ceiling willing with what little might I had left myself to just feel normal again.
But I didn't. And it never ended. Especially during the last month of my chemo. There just didn't feel like there was any light at the end of my tunnel and I wanted to just give up so badly! :*(
But I didn't give up. I even did an extra round of chemo my doctor decided to tack on. I plowed through it.

And it made me a stronger person. Learned during that time that it was okay for me to let myself be emotionally weak and depleted. I learned what it takes to push on when I didn't feel like I could push on any further.

I wouldn't wish chemo on anyone. Chemo truly freaking sucks.
But I am so glad that I had that experience. It made me a stronger person.

Blanched Dubois
12-28-13, 10:30 PM
i did a cleanse, don't recall the day i lost the addiction but it was within 2 weeks, then i got snuffed by a perforated bowel that 'can happen to anyone' all the Dr's told me ( to avoid accountability for not diagnosing it when i presented and let me walk around and go to mexico with my 16 yr old and a week later almost die from gang green and sepsis) - i started smoking american spirits again - ****** off - traumatized - and alone again but this time on the couch smiling thru tears into the eyes of the black lab love while son was suicidal and failing in school telling me to 'go die' when i'd ask for 'help' - all i can say is ...i can't smoke a regular cig -the chemicals are awful and i'm weaning down off these now - with meds - doing meditation. Walks with dog on beach, sound healing, lots of water, eating right and getting the right amount of sleep - also let go of negative people - keeping only the brightest near me and not 'helping others' - just caring for me now.

If you have the support around you and you feel able do it and just do it your way. If not, don't beat yourself up - like most things, it's a personal process. You can do it if you really want to and it's great to smell and taste things again like as a child.

phantasm
12-28-13, 10:39 PM
Quitting wasn't hard for me...don't get me wrong, I had to battle craves...they were CONSTANT for the first 3 weeks and as we all know cravings are absolutely misserable.
But I LOVED it! It was like a warrior was released in me and every crave I made it through just added to my ever growing list of battles I made it through. The more I battles I had under my belt the prouder I felt and the more the warrior inside of me would roar.

I am very fortunate for several reasons.

I haven't shared this here yet...but about 4 years ago I was diagnosed with testicular cancer. I was a very heavy smoker at the time (2+ packs a day at that point) and I was SO embarrassed about it. I had 2 doctors I was working with, and between the surgery I had as well as a dose of chemotherapy, I had met at least a dozen different nurses. I also had to be asked tons of questions about my health...and one question on every single questionnaire I had to fill out or answer was "Do you smoke?". Man did I hate myself for having to answer "Yes" on that one. I felt as if I gave myself my cancer by not taking better care of myself.


There was 2 events that happened during this time that really helped push me over into deciding I was done.

After having surgery to have my right testicle and tumor removed (the tumor was a little larger then a softball and had completely encased my testicle) one of the nurses was explaining to me that I needed to wait for the anesthesia to get out of my system before I smoked, or else I'd get sick. It was an outpaitiant surgery, so I got to go home right after the surgery was complete. As soon as my dad left the parking lot in his car I demanded for him to pull over so I could smoke. He refused so I opened the car door threatening to jump out (lol I was SO out of it!). He pulled over. I lit a smoke up. I got EXTREMELY sick to my stomach. I don't even know how to explain it. It was like I was made of playdoh and I was being pulled and stretched and twisted. I kept dry heaving which hurt like hell from the incision I had in my abdomen...but dam it, I needed a smoke. So I smoked that cigarette. I smoked it through the absolute sickness it was causing.
I didn't care. I "needed" that smoke!

The second event that really helped push me was when I was getting the chemo I needed. It was in a pretty small room, but it was filled with other people also recieving chemo. There was an older man there who had very sunkin in eyes and his skin was pale. I've never seen such sickly looking skin before and it made me so sad. I could tell this man must've been fighting cancer for a long time and the chemo was just destroying him.
There was an older woman who looked rather sad and wore a really pretty bandana on her hairless head. She had a friend there, and even though she looked so sad, she laughed a lot and I just loved her for it. How amazing she was to me. How strong!

And I was sitting there feeling stupid and guilty. I felt as if I had given myself my cancer in so many ways. And I wanted to smoke. I was in this room fighting cancer with others and I wanted to sneak out and smoke.

And I did. As soon as I was finished and the nurse unhooked me, I called my mom to come pick me up, and then I quietly left the clinic...snuck out behind a big green dumpster...and I lit up a smoke.
I felt like such an idiot, and I was SO afraid that one of the other chemo patients was going to see me...or even worse, one of the really sweet nurses.
I really hated myself in that moment. I really hated what I was doing.

It was within a month of the smoke behind that dumpster after receiving chemotherapy for cancer...it was then that I decided I was putting my foot down and quitting.

I'm a very stubborn person. I dug my heels into the ground and I was off.
Quitting came relatively easy for me.
But I was very lucky to have had such a situation to kick me in my *** like I did. It gave me that push I needed.

And I had quitnet.com. And that place was amazing! It was mainly women, and I felt like I was surrounded by aunts and grandmas. I loved it! I loved them! I still do! They gave me all the support in the world. And from day one they believed in me!
It was just amazing, and it was them that I really owe my quit to. I did quit cold turkey...but it's only because I had the amazing support that I received at quitnet.com.


So there's my story. Haven't shared it here at ADDForums yet, but it just felt right to do so tonight.

I quit and I haven't looked back. It was the single best thing I've done in many MANY years in my life.

OMG Hermann, a baseball??? Holy wow, that sounded incredibly horrifying. So glad you kicked cancer, TWICE! That made me sad hearing about hiding behind the dumpster. Addiction makes a person do the most inconceivable things. :( But good for you for kicking the habit and moving forward. I LOVED it too, it was a part of me. So I know how difficult it is to just give up. so proud of you!! :yes: