View Full Version : Dietary changes for joint inflammation


SB_UK
12-29-13, 12:25 PM
Several of us (Unmanagable, MeADD823) have described efforts to overcome inflammation through discarding gluten - any others ? and is it just gluten ? which works.

Think that wheat is a major part of the problem - not sure if it's the whole story though ... ... ...

Thinking sugar.
Thinking dairy.
Thinking MCT oil.
Thinking high GI carbs.

But before you know it - we're out of food.

Problem isn't there in the morning - comes on after food - grrrr!!

SB_UK
12-29-13, 12:49 PM
After radiation therapy for my cancer I developed a lot of new allergies. Gluten was one of them. I've seen no difference in ADHD. Actually, now that anxiety and depression from being so sick (and the @$$hats at my old school who were scared of "cancer chick") are in the past (not gone, but 150% better), my ADHD symptoms were markedly worse before going back on meds.

Being gluten free has improved my quality of life in other ways though. I was undergoing testing for rheumatoid arthritis because I could hardly walk from so much joint pain and that is gone (except before a big weather change). What we thought was eczema is gone. If I have any gluten now I break out in hives and my skin starts peeling off. It's sexy.:rolleyes:

I've had parents put their kids who have ADHD or autism on GF diets. Some show improvement others don't. My nieces both react to gluten. One has awful behavior for days if she eats it. The other gets yeast infections.

I guess I'm in the middle on the topic of gluten & ADHD. Maybe some people have a positive reaction. I definitely did not re: ADHD.

..........

Allegra113
12-29-13, 01:20 PM
I was about to reference the same post. Thanks SB_UK. might not work for everyone, but has changed my life immensely.

SB_UK
12-29-13, 02:21 PM
What we thought was eczema is gone.


I experience eczema on eating hyperglycaemic foods (eg bread in France).


Same pattern.

SB_UK
12-29-13, 02:45 PM
Woke up a couple of days ago with WGA screaming to be heard !

What is unique about WGA is that it can do direct damage to the majority of tissues in the human body without requiring a specific set of genetic susceptibilities and/or immune-mediated articulations. This may explain why chronic inflammatory and degenerative conditions are endemic to wheat-consuming populations even when overt allergies or intolerances to wheat gluten appear exceedingly rare. Maybe !!

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

SB_UK
12-29-13, 03:14 PM
To investigate the possible effects on the immune system of the long-term absence of such signals, two groups of rats were fed on a diet containing or deprived of WG. The WG-deprived diet induced a state of functional unresponsiveness in lymphocytes from primary and secondary lymphoid organs, as evaluated by in vitro stimulation with T cell mitogen phytohemoagglutinin (PHA) and B cell mitogen lypopolysaccarides (LPS). The unresponsive state of the immune cells could be reversed by injection of antigen emulsified in oil with inactivated mycobacteria (complete Freund's adjuvant, CFA) Dietary signals can thus interact with the immune system
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12400879

-*-

Lectins again ! and we're back to the idea of soaking/drying seeds and nuts prior to consumption.

Pesky lectins driving our immune system mad ??

SB_UK
12-29-13, 03:16 PM
Why are lectins not studied so heavily ?

Because DNA is so much easier to fiddle with.

And when all you've got is a hammer, everything's a genetic condition.

Besides - who wants to know that our 'favourite' foods are killing us ?

SB_UK
12-29-13, 03:33 PM
So - stuff that doesn't really want to be eaten puts up lectins to protect itself - and if we eat them - they're capable of non-specific immune system activation ie as described in the paper above ?

So what should we (of permanent inflammation) eat ?
Stuff that wants to be eaten.

As simple as that ?
I guess it could be.

SB_UK
12-29-13, 05:08 PM
By eliminating dietary elements, particularly lectins, ... it is proposed that the peripheral antigenic stimulus (both pathogenic and dietary) will be reduced and thereby result in a diminution of disease symptoms in certain patients with RA [joint inflammation].

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10884708

Unmanagable
12-29-13, 05:52 PM
In the last year-ish or so, I've been slowly eliminating as many processed food-like substances as possible and trying to eat more wholesome foods. Arthritic pain, extreme loss of bone cartilage, and several other medical issues heightened my awareness and forced me to take a closer look at what I was choosing to fuel my body with. I was making some really poor and unhealthy choices, big time. Some of the changes include:

I use local raw honey, molasses, raw cane sugar, local maple and hickory syrup, and/or coconut palm sugar to sweeten things instead of processed white sugar.

I've eliminated table salt and switched to Himalayan pink sea salt.

I've eliminated most dairy - except cheese - but I now buy locally made cheese.

I use sesame oil, coconut oil, and olive oil to cook with.

I no longer visit any drive-thru windows, unless it's to grab a tea.

I use locally made real butter, unsalted, instead of margarine.

I drink organic fruit juice with seltzer water, or kombucha, instead of soda.

I use coconut butter as a sweetener in coffee (w/ an occasional splash of irish cream) instead of the processed flavored creamers.

I use organic cacao powder and nibs in place of cocoa powder.

I replaced all milk chocolate with dark chocolate.

Smoothies made with frozen fruits, ground flax seeds, coconut butter, local bee pollen, non-dairy milk (almond/flax/coconut/hemp), and fresh greens make good ice cream substitutes and/or breakfast/lunch options.

Getting to know the farmers and food producers is now a priority for me, too. I want to know where the stuff I choose to ingest comes from and the process it goes through to get to my table. That also opens up the door for me to lend a helping hand where needed and create bartering opportunities for the pricier products.

The most valuable lesson I've learned through this whole process is realizing that if our body does not recognize an ingredient, it will not process it healthily, no matter how much we want to convince ourselves it is just because we don't immediately feel ill. Long term effects can, and will, arise in many ways. Most of which, in my case, had been ignored by trusted and respected professionals and/or diagnosed incorrectly, repeatedly.

Many of the things I used to consume daily (for approximately 40ish years) now taste like crap and my body automatically rejects it. Sometimes it violently rejects it. I'm glad I know what I know now and wish others luck in figuring out what works best for them in their efforts to feel better. Having the "system" provide the less healthy food-like substances in a manner that makes them much more affordable and accessible creates more hurdles than it should, but, it is what it is, and it pi**** me off.

sarahsweets
12-30-13, 08:40 AM
I have to say SB that I have an extremely hard time following you or kunja's posts, not for lack of inteligence but mostly because visually its kind of cluttered to me(hope you understand). I know zero about gluten but I will swear by glucosamin/chondrointen. I know I know they recently had yet another study debunking the whole thing saying it does nothing for joints or pain or much of anything. My husband broke his ankle 5 years ago and tore 3 ligaments its been the only substance taken everyday that helps. when we run out he knows it. Now Im no fool it could be a placebo but who gives a sh*t even if it is, if it works?

SB_UK
12-30-13, 12:45 PM
I know zero about gluten but I will swear by glucosamin/chondrointen.

One way to gauge just how pervasive the adverse effects of WGA are among wheat-consuming populations is the popularity of the dietary supplement glucosamine. In the USA, a quarter-billion dollars’ worth of glucosamine is sold annually. The main source of glucosamine on the market is from the N-Acetylglucosamine-rich chitin exoskelotons of crustaceans like shrimp and crab. Glucosamine is used for reducing pain and inflammation. We do not have a dietary deficiency of the pulverized shells of dead sea critters, just as our use of NSAIDs is not caused by a deficiency of these synthetic chemicals in our diet. When we consume glucosamine supplements, the WGA, instead of binding to our tissues, binds to the pulverized chitin in the glucosamine supplements, sparing us from the full impact of WGA.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

SB_UK
12-30-13, 12:46 PM
Just dropping wheat knocks out 90% of the pain, in a couple of days !

EXPT possible through 1 week of high wheat eating followed by 2 days not
- the difference is stark.Personal experience the French processed white flour baguette is the worst of the lot.

No wonder it's called 'le pain'.

SB_UK
12-30-13, 12:51 PM
The solution -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprouted_bread

- exactly as it seems to work for nuts and seeds (ie soaking)

The sprouting also breaks down the lectins and other substances that some individuals may be sensitive or allergic to.


1 solution solves all !!

Lunacie
12-30-13, 12:54 PM
We dropped wheat from our family diet a few years ago, it didn't make any
difference for any of us.

We have now gone lo-carb hi-fiber with pasta and breads. They're still made
from wheat but aren't so highly processed. Cooking time can make a big
difference too, the longer pasta is cooked the more the natural fibers break
down. This is what helps our family.

Also, I started taking Vitamin D3 a few years ago and feel that has been a big
help for me personally, along with the Omega 3 and the B-complex and the
Magnesium supplements.

I absolutely cannot drink instant tea - which is what they serve at fast food
places. It wreaks havoc on my kidneys and bladder and tastes like crap to me.

SB_UK
12-30-13, 01:02 PM
So - what's the most attractive meal known to man ?

A cream cake.

That's gluten exorphin + caseomorphin with WGA and sat fat.

Expt with wheat results in inflammation.
Expt with EVCO (sat fat) results in inflammation (described elsewhere on site).

So ? we're being kidded by the 'lovely' opiates into thinking we like these foods - and underlying each is a nasty nasty highly pro-inflammatory molecule.

Cream cake = WGA + SAT FAT
Bread and butter = WGA + SAT FAT
Cookies and milk = WGA + SAT FAT

WGA and sat fat really set me off.

-*-

Opiates!!

SB_UK
12-30-13, 01:10 PM
I've eliminated most dairy[QUOTE]
[quote=Unmanagable;1585489]I've been purposely avoiding gluten for a little over a month now. I have experienced marked improvements in experiencing much less inflammation (arthritic issues) ...

and back we come to GF/CF
- for non-specific inflammation.

Which underlies ALL diseases of Western living - most notably diabesity
- which the world is currently drowing under.

SB_UK
12-30-13, 01:12 PM
Also, I started taking Vitamin D3 a few years ago and feel that has been a big
help for me personally, along with the Omega 3 and the B-complex and the
Magnesium supplements.

I absolutely cannot drink instant tea - which is what they serve at fast food
places. It wreaks havoc on my kidneys and bladder and tastes like crap to me.

Sun exposure for Vit D and veggies for Magnesium ?

All tea (white, green, non-instant black) ?

meadd823
12-30-13, 01:58 PM
Opening Pandora's Bread Box: The Critical Role of Wheat Lectin in Human Disease (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease)


Indeed, WGA lectin is so powerful as an insecticide that biotech firms have used recombinant DNA technology to create genetically modified WGA-enhanced plants



The Dark Side of Wheat - New Perspectives On Celiac Disease and Wheat Intolerance - by Sayer Ji (http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/dark-side-wheat-new-perspectives-celiac-disease-wheat-intolerance-sayer-ji)



It is this co-dependence that may explain why our culture has for so long consistently confined wheat intolerance to categorically distinct, "genetically-based" diseases like "celiac." These categorizations may protect us from the realization that wheat exerts a vast number of deleterious effects on human health in the same way that "lactose intolerance" distracts attention from the deeper problems associated with the casein protein found in cow’s milk. Rather than see wheat for what it very well may be: a biologically inappropriate food source, we "blame the victim," and look for genetic explanations for what’s wrong with small subgroups of our population who have the most obvious forms of intolerance to wheat consumption, e.g. celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, etc. The medical justification for these classifications may be secondary to economic and cultural imperatives that require the inherent problems associated with wheat consumption be minimized or occluded.


There is evidence that WGA may cause increased shedding of the intestinal brush border membrane, reduction in surface area, acceleration of cell losses and shortening of villi, via binding to the surface of the villi. WGA can mimic the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) at the cellular level, indicating that the crypt hyperplasia seen in celiac disease may be due to a mitogenic reponse induced by WGA. WGA has been implicated in obesity and "leptin resistance" by blocking the receptor in the hypothalamus for the appetite satiating hormone leptin. WGA has also been shown to have an insulin-mimetic action, potentially contributing to weight gain and insulin resistance.15 And, as discussed earlier, wheat lectin has been shown to induce IgA mediated damage to the kidney, indicating that nephropathy and kidney cancer may be associated with wheat consumption.


I have spent many a long hour explaining to diabetic patients the "evils" of starch and breads have upon the blood sugar - While concentrated sweets raise the sugar rapidly and then drop in equally as rapidly may be perceived with greater ease starches and breads raise the blood sugar more gradually and keep it up for longer period of time - because the raise and lower effects of consumption are more gradual many dietetics are unaware of the deleterious effect upon their hyperglycemia

This article has many a good point from a medical as well as a dietary stand point

continued from same article


John B. Symes, D.V.M. is responsible for drawing attention to the potential excitotoxicity of wheat, dairy, and soy, due to their exceptionally high levels of the non-essential amino acids glutamic and aspartic acid. Excitotoxicity is a pathological process where glutamic and aspartic acid cause an over-activation of the nerve cell receptors (e.g. NMDA and AMPA receptor) leading to calcium induced nerve and brain injury. Of all cereal grasses commonly consumed wheat contains the highest levels of glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Glutamic acid is largely responsible for wheat’s exceptional taste. The Japanese coined the word umami to describe the extraordinary "yummy" effect that glutamic acid exerts on the tongue and palate, and invented monosodium glutamate (MSG) to amplify this sensation. Though the Japanese first synthesized MSG from kelp, wheat can also be used due to its high glutamic acid content. It is likely that wheat’s popularity, alongside its opiate-like activity, has everything to do with the natural flavor-enhancers already contained within it. These amino acids may contribute to neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Alzhemier disease, Huntington’s disease, and other nervous disorders such as epilepsy, attention deficit disorder and migraines.

Although the jury is still out as far as I am concerned with regards to wheat being responsible for ADD or Alzheimer for that matter I do purpose that these area should be explored from a more objective point of view than they have been thus far - Because such objectiveness is not likely it may be worth it for some individuals with ADD especially those of us who have several autoimmune disorders in tow to consider the reduction if not the total elimination of wheat gluten - Personally the elimination of all "white starches" is optimum and not too too limiting as far as food choices go


I would love love love to go totally gluten free, I opt for gluten free when the choice presents itself but going totally gluten free can prove impossible at times seeing as I do not have total control over the dietary foods available.

meadd823
12-30-13, 02:41 PM
Minus the political side - although any one who follows me of facebook knows I have one......... I would also look into limiting if not eliminating corn at least for those if us in the USA - Much of our corn is genetically modified without us even knowing it


Bt-CORN: WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT WORKS (http://www2.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef130.asp)


Other countries are smarter about these things . . .


. . .. .

Lunacie
12-30-13, 02:50 PM
Minus the political side - although any one who follows me of facebook knows I have one......... I would also look into limiting if not eliminating corn at least for those if us in the USA - Much of our corn is genetically modified without us even knowing it


Bt-CORN: WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT WORKS (http://www2.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef130.asp)


Other countries are smarter about these things . . .


. . .. .

Yes! Corn is more insidious than wheat - it's in everything we eat and drink(almost).

meadd823
12-30-13, 03:59 PM
What makes me mad regarding GMO is their blatant effort to stop labeling it - If it were perfectly safe and legit then labeling it would not be a problem.:mad: I could go on all day regarding the GMO thing.

Out of respect for the OP I shall do my best to get back on topic

At least the wheat gluten are found in the ingredient listings and can be avoided by those who wish to do so as long as one is aware of all the possible chemical names that is . . .

Source is one written to dieticians


Two of a Kind — Research Connects Celiac and Thyroid Diseases and Suggests a Gluten-Free Diet Benefits Both (http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/110310p52.shtml)


A 2008 study by Naiyer et al explored the connection between autoimmune hypothyroidism and celiac disease and hypothesized a mechanism via serum antitissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies. It is well established that anti-tTG antibodies are present in patients with active celiac disease and that they decrease and eventually disappear on a gluten-free diet. The study demonstrated that these anti-tTG antibodies bind and react to thyroid tissue as well, which may contribute to ATD development. Antithyroid antibodies were observed more often in patients with celiac disease than in either controls or patients with another autoimmune condition (eg, Crohn’s disease).10,11

The second one is from a blog. Offers a decent over view along with some source that can be "googled" for reference.



Hyperlipid=Gluten, thyroid and auto immunity (Gluten, thyroid and auto immunity )

The findings, reported in the February issue of Digestive Diseases and Sciences, show that the prevalence of celiac disease was 3.4% in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis, and 0.6% and 0.25% among the two control groups.

Moreover, the study found an association between untreated celiac disease, gluten intake and autoimmune disorders. The researchers write, "We believe that undiagnosed celiac disease can cause other disorders by switching on some as yet unknown immunological mechanism. Untreated celiac patients produce organ-specific autoantibodies."


Last of all but not least . . . I used the nursing portion of this final publication for clinical educational credits so their legitimacy in medicine is acceptable


Pediatric Celiac Disease Clinical Presentation (http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/932104-clinical)


Arthritis and arthralgia: Arthritis can be a common extraintestinal manifestation of adults with celiac disease, including those on a gluten-free diet. As many as 3% of children with juvenile chronic arthritis may have celiac disease.

Osteopenia and osteoporosis: Approximately 50% of children and 75% of adults have a low bone mineral density at the time of diagnosis; this low density reaches severe degrees, including osteoporosis. Bone mineral density improves in most patients on gluten-free diet and returns to normal as soon as 1 year after starting the diet in children. However, the response to the diet can be much less marked in adults.

Psychiatric disorders: Although a large number of behavioral problems and disorders (eg, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) have been thought to be caused by celiac disease, no evidence has been conclusive. However, celiac disease can be associated with some psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. These conditions can be severe and usually respond to a gluten-free diet.


Celiac disease is also known to be strongly associated with numerous disorders, specifically with autoimmune conditions and genetic syndromes (eg, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, Turner syndrome).

The association of celiac disease with autoimmune conditions is well known. A strong positive correlation between the age at diagnosis and the prevalence of autoimmune disorders (eg, type 1 diabetes mellitus, thyroiditis, alopecia) is recognized; this suggests that the continuous ingestion of gluten before diagnosis may induce the development of other autoimmune conditions.


If you click on the images there is a slide type presentation with the last one stating

Prevalence of Celiac disease in other autoimmune conditions

Type I diabetes 3.5-10%

Thyroiditis 4-8%

Autoimmune liver 6-8%

Arthritis 1.5 -7.5%

Sjogren's Syndrome 2-15%

Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy 5.7%

IgA nephropathy 3.6%

~All underling and bolding in source material added by me ~


and one has three of the seven listed autoimmune disorders - hello!!!!

I make it a policy to avoid debating another person's reality. I also understand what is good for the goose is NOT always good for the gander the same holds true for harm.

I do see where there may be a connection here for me personally - I have done a decent amount of research into this topic - almost as much as I have ADHD and cats - I use a number of sources both orthodox and alternative ones with a bit of logic from me own brain and experiences which to draw my conclusions.

I keep asking myself:

How can systemic inflammation NOT effect my brain ?????

SB_UK
12-31-13, 01:52 PM
How can systemic inflammation NOT effect my brain ?????

The most important first step is to figure out what is causing brain inflammation. Gluten is a very common cause.

http://brain-dr.com/taming-brain-inflammation/

phantasm
12-31-13, 02:11 PM
In the last year-ish or so, I've been slowly eliminating as many processed food-like substances as possible and trying to eat more wholesome foods. Arthritic pain, extreme loss of bone cartilage, and several other medical issues heightened my awareness and forced me to take a closer look at what I was choosing to fuel my body with. I was making some really poor and unhealthy choices, big time. Some of the changes include:

I use local raw honey, molasses, raw cane sugar, local maple and hickory syrup, and/or coconut palm sugar to sweeten things instead of processed white sugar.

I've eliminated table salt and switched to Himalayan pink sea salt.

I've eliminated most dairy - except cheese - but I now buy locally made cheese.

I use sesame oil, coconut oil, and olive oil to cook with.

I no longer visit any drive-thru windows, unless it's to grab a tea.

I use locally made real butter, unsalted, instead of margarine.

I drink organic fruit juice with seltzer water, or kombucha, instead of soda.

I use coconut butter as a sweetener in coffee (w/ an occasional splash of irish cream) instead of the processed flavored creamers.

I use organic cacao powder and nibs in place of cocoa powder.

I replaced all milk chocolate with dark chocolate.

Smoothies made with frozen fruits, ground flax seeds, coconut butter, local bee pollen, non-dairy milk (almond/flax/coconut/hemp), and fresh greens make good ice cream substitutes and/or breakfast/lunch options.

Getting to know the farmers and food producers is now a priority for me, too. I want to know where the stuff I choose to ingest comes from and the process it goes through to get to my table. That also opens up the door for me to lend a helping hand where needed and create bartering opportunities for the pricier products.

The most valuable lesson I've learned through this whole process is realizing that if our body does not recognize an ingredient, it will not process it healthily, no matter how much we want to convince ourselves it is just because we don't immediately feel ill. Long term effects can, and will, arise in many ways. Most of which, in my case, had been ignored by trusted and respected professionals and/or diagnosed incorrectly, repeatedly.

Many of the things I used to consume daily (for approximately 40ish years) now taste like crap and my body automatically rejects it. Sometimes it violently rejects it. I'm glad I know what I know now and wish others luck in figuring out what works best for them in their efforts to feel better. Having the "system" provide the less healthy food-like substances in a manner that makes them much more affordable and accessible creates more hurdles than it should, but, it is what it is, and it pi**** me off.

I totally agree! :goodpost: When I eat healthy, this is very close to my diet as well and it will take the inflammation right out. So much that in one day I lose 2-3 pounds of inflammation and water retention due to inflammation.

phantasm
12-31-13, 02:20 PM
I like to think of inflammation as an "allergic" reaction. (totally my terminology, not scientific terminology)

If the food is having a bad (allergic) reaction to my body, then it will show me the negative signs ie. inflammation, constipation, headaches, sugar spikes, acne, tiredness, brain fog, weight gain etc.

If the food is having a positive (non-allergic) reaction on my body then these will be the signs ie. boost in energy, better focus, feeling more positive, less joint pain, clear skin, weight loss, you get the idea.

This is my own way of thinking about food. And these sensations, feelings, and reactions are immediate to me when eating healthy or non healthy food.

SB_UK
12-31-13, 02:57 PM
Excitotoxicity is a pathological process where glutamic and aspartic acid cause an over-activation of the nerve cell receptors ...

Back to the idea of glu as the enemy,

glucose
glutamic acid

Stimulants.

The 2 things which're suggested we drop in epilepsy (ketogenic diet and the zero excititoxin diet (J. Dog (http://dogtorj.com/)tor)).

And it's interesting how many of the ant-epilepsy medications are anti-bipolar meds.

We've just jumped through psych. disorders, autoimmune disorders, neuro disorders, standard metabolic disoreders etc etc

- and underlying them all:

http://www.bonappetit.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/devils-food-cake-with-hazelnut-crunch-646.jpg

Devil's food cake ! :mad::mad:

SB_UK
12-31-13, 03:10 PM
Back to the idea of glu as the enemy,

glucose
glutamic acid



& Lectin is the molecular glue of living organisms.

Reaction to legumes

Abi
01-01-14, 02:55 AM
YUM :)

SB If I eat the cake can I go to the chiropractor to fix my neck after? :) :)

mrs. dobbs
01-01-14, 09:20 AM
I get mentally ill and rheumatoid if I eat wheat gluten or dairy.

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:13 PM
I get mentally ill and rheumatoid if I eat wheat gluten or dairy.

Thanks.

Pattern emerging!!

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:18 PM
YUM :)

SB If I eat the cake can I go to the chiropractor to fix my neck after? :) :)

As long as you have a genetic test and then eat 1 randomly chosen pharmaceutical pill from a bag containing at least one of each.

You will of course be awarded an honorary degree for your efforts.

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:20 PM
Good news
Pain free today !

Bad news
I've not eaten anything.

I reckon I've 60 days before things get hairy !!

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:33 PM
Great lectin page.
(http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-lectins)
How important are lectins in the grand scheme of things ?

I think that they're very, very important.

They're designed to stop you eating 'em - and so all things considered, it makes sense if that's exactly what they then do.

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:49 PM
I like to think of inflammation as an "allergic" reaction. (totally my terminology, not scientific terminology)


Been trying to find this connection - and there it was all the time!!

Some experts hypothesize that it’s no coincidence the top 8 allergens also contain some of the highest amounts of lectins (including: dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish).

Hmmm ... ... maybe lectin based inflammation (allergy) is the single most significant contributor to disease ?

Wouldn't surprise me - severe problems with nuts - all of which go away after soaking.

SB_UK
01-01-14, 12:54 PM
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/
Wheat gliadin, which causes coeliac disease, contains a lectin like substance that binds to human intestinal mucosa,<sup>6 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/#B6)</sup> and this has been debated as the “coeliac disease toxin” for over 20 years.<sup>7 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/#B7)</sup> But coeliac disease is already managed by gluten avoidance, so nothing would change were the lectin hypothesis proved. It's not gluten causing coeliac disease - it's lectin.

... but in the past two decades we have realised that many lectins are (a) toxic, inflammatory, or both; (b) resistant to cooking and digestive enzymes; and (c) present in much of our food.

SB_UK
01-01-14, 03:16 PM
Posts: 16,666I 6666
<- Sign of the ABI !