View Full Version : School atmosphere and ADHD diagnosis


Daydreamin22
12-29-13, 05:23 AM
I found an interesting article on ths very subject. Am I hijacking the thread? Move if neccessary.
Mod Note: Moved to its own thread


http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freedom-learn/201007/adhd-and-school-the-problem-assessing-normalcy-in-abnormal-environment

LynneC
01-01-14, 10:18 AM
While I don't disagree with some points that the author makes about the typical school learning environment, the following statement is simplistic and vastly incomplete:
What does it mean to have ADHD? Basically, it means failure to adapt to the conditions of standard schooling

ADHD is much more than that, as most parents of children diagnosed with ADHD will tell you. Yes, quite often it's in the school setting that ADHD may first be recognized, but the school environment didn't cause ADHD. And ADHD extends well beyond the school environment.

The tale that the author relates about the physician mom who refused to treat her son's ADHD (and the child consistently failed his classes throughout his schooling) is nothing short of negligent, IMO.
Throughout his school years he was funny, playful, extraordinarily impulsive, and a huge pain in the neck to essentially all of his teachers. He rarely completed a school assignment and was constantly disruptive in class. He truly could not focus on any of his school lessons and he seemed unable to prevent himself from saying what was on his mind rather than what he was supposed to say.

His parents were regularly called in for conferences. When school officials asked his parents to take him to a clinic for ADHD diagnosis, his mother--a physician who knew that the long-term brain effects of the drugs used to treat ADHD have never been tested in humans and have proven deleterious in laboratory animals--refused to do so. The boy had all the characteristics of ADHD Combined Type, and I have no doubt that he would have received that diagnosis had his mother consented.

Thanks to a relatively lenient and understanding assistant principal, he was passed along from grade to grade, even though he did almost none of the assigned work and failed most of his tests. He graduated from high school at the bottom of his class.
Really? Can you imagine what this child's self-esteem was while going through all of this? Not a glowing testimonial for non-treatment. (and I won't even comment on the 'long-term brain effects and deleterious to lab rats' statement, with no supporting references :eyebrow: )

Daydreamin22
01-01-14, 11:15 AM
I know, hopefully it's only helpful in terms of practicality and knowledge, though. It's hard to tell whether everything said is legit. It's not like this source is Harvard, University or Pennsylvania.. or another top/cutting edge info/researcher. That's the very reason I usually get my sources from them. Everything else seems to have errors in it. There may be some misleading statements. Hopefully not flat out wrong ones. I'm hoping that they don't cause problems and that there is more right (insight, perspective, practical information) that will be helpful.

I feel bad for the boy who went through that. His mother either didn't know what to do (apparently no idea) or she didn't care... Would have been better for everyone if she'd taken some time to make it work or at least get some help. Hopefully they'll get more teachers on board in the future. It's just unacceptable. Info's out there. Accommodate the kids.

Daydreamin22
01-01-14, 11:19 AM
Here's another link that may be helpful regarding going on disability.

Hopefully correct, even though run by government.. not sure where they get the info. Hopefully from the lead specialists/facilities for ADHD..and hopefully up to date as well. Sure it will be more pros than cons. Especially in terms of practicality.

http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/adhd-related-issues/adhd

zette93
01-01-14, 12:43 PM
This video from the National Center for Learning Disabilities is an interesting counterpoint:

ADHD -- Separating Fact from Fiction: http://www.ncld.org/learning-disability-resources/videos/video-adhd-attention-deficit-separating-fact-fiction

I do agree that perhaps schools should be structured differently, or perhaps there should more choices in different types of schools, so that the 10% of kids who don't learn well in the standard model can still get a good education.

ccom5100
01-01-14, 05:56 PM
While I don't disagree with some points that the author makes about the typical school learning environment, the following statement is simplistic and vastly incomplete:
ADHD is much more than that, as most parents of children diagnosed with ADHD will tell you. Yes, quite often it's in the school setting that ADHD may first be recognized, but the school environment didn't cause ADHD. And ADHD extends well beyond the school environment.

Since the article was specifically about School and ADHD, I don't think the above criticism is really warranted.

The tale that the author relates about the physician mom who refused to treat her son's ADHD (and the child consistently failed his classes throughout his schooling) is nothing short of negligent, IMO.

Really? Can you imagine what this child's self-esteem was while going through all of this? Not a glowing testimonial for non-treatment. (and I won't even comment on the 'long-term brain effects and deleterious to lab rats' statement, with no supporting references :eyebrow: )Many kids who are being treated for adhd still have these problems in school; otherwise there would be no reason for so many IEP and 504 accommodations. Most kids are not entirely symptom free, even with treatment, and still experience difficulty with adapting to a school environment.

LynneC
01-01-14, 06:36 PM
Many kids who are being treated for adhd still have these problems in school; otherwise there would be no reason for so many IEP and 504 accommodations. Most kids are not entirely symptom free, even with treatment, and still experience difficulty with adapting to a school environment.
Very true; in my son's case he still struggles in school (academically, this year, for the first time) with attention issues, completing work on time, etc. , and yes, he takes a stimulant ADHD medication. Unmedicated, he is unable to focus at all and probably would be 'at the bottom of his class'.
We don't have a 504, but that will be the next step for us, now that he is in middle school...