View Full Version : tDCS electrode placement


Carol
01-01-14, 06:08 PM
I purchased an inexpensive tDCS device, and I was trying to determine electrode placement. (I'm satisfied that its safety has been established; moreover, I'm ready to bang my head against a wall to stimulate my brain.) I have severe problems with behavioral activation/motivation.

I came across a clinical trial testing tDCS for ADHD (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01649232?term=NCT01649232&rank=1), which places the anode electrode over F3 and the cathode over the contralateral mastoid area. However, I don't know if they are targeting symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, etc.

I realize this is oversimplifying the process, but any help would be appreciated.

meadd823
01-02-14, 01:28 AM
You are doing this to yourself or are you wanting to discuss the science behind the idea?

Electrical work while forgetting to unplug the said device is over all stimulating and works wonders at grabbing one's attention however I would not recommend it as a form of ADHD treatment!

mildadhd
01-02-14, 03:17 AM
I purchased an inexpensive tDCS device, and I was trying to determine electrode placement. (I'm satisfied that its safety has been established; moreover, I'm ready to bang my head against a wall to stimulate my brain.) I have severe problems with behavioral activation/motivation.

I came across a clinical trial testing tDCS for ADHD (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01649232?term=NCT01649232&rank=1), which places the anode electrode over F3 and the cathode over the contralateral mastoid area. However, I don't know if they are targeting symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, etc.

I realize this is oversimplifying the process, but any help would be appreciated.

Never heard of it.

What makes you satisfied that its safety has been established?





i!i

purpleToes
01-02-14, 06:11 AM
I purchased an inexpensive tDCS device, and I was trying to determine electrode placement. (I'm satisfied that its safety has been established; moreover, I'm ready to bang my head against a wall to stimulate my brain.) I have severe problems with behavioral activation/motivation.

I came across a clinical trial testing tDCS for ADHD (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01649232?term=NCT01649232&rank=1), which places the anode electrode over F3 and the cathode over the contralateral mastoid area. However, I don't know if they are targeting symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, etc.

I realize this is oversimplifying the process, but any help would be appreciated.

Woudl you be willing to PM me a source for the device you found? I've been curious about this for a while ever since I read this article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/29/science/jump-starter-kits-for-the-mind.html?_r=0
(http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/29/science/jump-starter-kits-for-the-mind.html?_r=0)

I think I tried one of these devices at the office of one of my psychiatrists one time. Sorry, I don't remember how it was applied. I do remember that it was a very peculiar sensation, not painful but I didn't find it pleasant, either. Part of the discomfort was probably because I was able dial the intensity myself and I thought if I did it too mild, it wouldn't do anything. It felt like it was warping my brain in a rhythmic force field. I didn't notice feeling any better, smarter or different afterwards but I don't know if I was supposed to after only one session.

Kunga Dorji
01-04-14, 05:54 PM
I'm not sure about these inexpensive devices.
The Alpha-stim and Fischer Wallace devices use electrodes clipped to the ears.
I use Alpha Stim myself and am very much impressed with it.
I will start a separate thread to go into more detail about this, as I have just discovered a very large cache of information on this from University of California Davis.

In the meantime-- for the skeptics-- this link to an Australian Professor of Psychiatry speaking briefly on clinical results is worth viewing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hWy2GTfFiA

Carol
02-03-14, 12:22 AM
I found an article about a study using tDCS to stimulate the dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain by placing electrodes on the prefrontal cortex. The study used attractiveness ratings as a measure of successfully stimulating dopaminergic neurons. ADD is not mentioned but this area is associated with motivation and reward, so I assume it's the same area that would be targeted for ADD. Here's the link:

http://www.smallerquestions.org/blog/2013/6/17/hey-boy-you-really-activate-my-ventral-midbrain.html