View Full Version : School not willing to give an inch


ccpat6
01-15-14, 06:53 PM
So my son was diagnosed with ADHD at the beginning of second grade, I eventually relented and allowed him to try medication and it has made a world of difference. He did struggle with reading till about 5th grade, but we worked our butts off and he finially got to be on level. He has always done very well in math, as in getting 94% or higher on end of level exams, and 100% in 5th grade.

He is now 12, in the 7th grade and these are the issues we're dealing with now-
-In lower grades teachers didn't penalize him grade wise for late assignments, now in middle school being a few days late has a massive impact. Our school has an online system called powerschool that students and parents can use to access grades, but some teachers only update it once a week, so by the time I even know it's late he may only get a 60%.
-He does his work and forgets to turn it in! This one drives me a little nuts. :-) I will go through his backpack, get everything organized, bundled per class, and then once he's actually at school the next day he doesn't remember to turn it in.
-He currently is getting no accommodations
-He was in honors English/Social Studies, Math & Science, but his English/social studies insisted he be pulled out of the class because of the effect of the missing assignments on his grade.
-Now his grades have dipped across the board by school policy he should be removed from the other honors classes. BUT the Math teacher is saying he should be allowed to stay in it and she will work with him :-) {love it when teachers are willing to be reasonable-why is this so rare?}
-Found out the school never bothered to put it in his records during elementary school, although he was on a speech IEP and still is. When I asked about accommodations the school said the lst testing done was in the 2nd grade it will all need to be redone. We met almost 2 months ago and they just emailed me today that they have just finished up and will be able to meet soon.
-When I asked last year for him to be given a list per class of the assignments I was told this was an unreasonable accommodation, and that I was asking too much of the teachers.


So, what is reasonable to ask for/insist on, and what isn't? ANy recommendations/suggestions would really be appreciated.

zette93
01-15-14, 08:13 PM
There's a sticky thread on this forum about accommodations:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=132817

Also search for ADHD on the wrightslaw website.

If he had an IEP in 2nd grade, a retest was due in 5th to requalify. Likely they will declare that he doesn't need an IEP and will offer a 504 instead. I think it's usually worth hiring an educational advocate to help if you can afford one. Probably one of the less expensive ones ($50/hr) would do in this case. Often you can get an initial consultation for free.

sarahsweets
01-16-14, 05:56 AM
Well I will do my best to share what I have experienced. If he has an IEP of any kind even for speech it is important that you read it over with a magnifying glass to see that they are doing every single thing out lined in it. It is true that students have to be "retested" or reevaluated every few years. Here it is every 3 years. We also have power school which I hate. I requested a paper copy of progress reports and report cards be sent to me anyway and they had to comply. What you need to to do is draft a letter outlining very specifically your concerns, your desire for a timely evaluation and response and your desired outcome. Here in NJ the schools have 60 days from the receipt of the letter to complete all of their testing and schedule a meeting to go over the results and make an IEP with the parents. This is why you must send the letter certified ,return receipt requested. They will have to sign for it and and clock will begin ticking. You should also send the letter to multiple people. Way back in the beginning for my son, I sent my intitial letter to the principal,special ed dept and the school's child study team, This way there were no excuses that someone didnt get the letter. I also employed twice a child advocate. She is a bulldog who knows every little law and strikes the fear of god into the school staff when she walks in with a parent to an IEP meeting.

Its so hard because we are so used to bending over backwards, apologizing for our kids, like they did something wrong or are defective when they deserve this education and the school must do their job and work with us to make it a fair and equal education. You definitely need to read up on wrights law and if you are interested read my thread about medicating my son that is a sticky in the children's diagnosis section. It gives more detail about our struggles and successes than I wanted to type here.

Good luck and keep your chin up!

jojo4321
01-18-14, 12:05 PM
I have a daughter in Grade 9, and we have been going through very similar issues with our school. We live in Canada, so it is a different system than in the U.S., but in our case, the IEP is an absolute must, and I go back to it very often when we deal we resistant teachers. We also hired a specialized tutor who comes to our house twice a week to help our daughter through the school work. The tutor communicates directly with the teachers, which has helped us a lot, although it is expensive.

There is not question that staying on top of it day after day is very time consuming and energy draining... Good luck with it all.

Johanne

beepbeep
03-05-14, 02:40 AM
ts so hard because we are so used to bending over backwards, apologizing for our kids, like they did something wrong or are defective when they deserve this education and the school must do their job and work with us to make it a fair and equal education. You definitely need to read up on wrights law and if you are interested read my thread about medicating my son that is a sticky in the children's diagnosis section. It gives more detail about our struggles and successes than I wanted to type here.

So true! I am really tired of this. I did not get an IEP but a 504. I am very frustrated with the teacher and the school. Should I fight for an IEP?

sarahsweets
03-05-14, 06:19 AM
You can always fight for an IEP if your child has been diagnosed with anything or previously received services through the school. If a child has had accomodations in the past, then they should need them in the present and future. A child doesnt wake up one day and all of a sudden their struggles disappear with maturity. Some things can become less of an issue the older the child gets but most often the issues a child has just get worse or are expressed in different ways. If you are not satisfied with the accomodations or classification that your child was given its time for that letter again. You have a right to appeal their classification, accomodations, and whether or not your child has a 504 or IEP. One thing to keep in mind is that schools dont want to have more kids with IEP's. This costs them more money because this usually involves services like speech PT or OT, smaller class sizes, different ways to handle a workload and more work for the teacher. Its a sad fact but the less the school has to do beyond providing a child a basic education, the better it is for their bottom line. Write a letter, stating why you do not agree with the conclusion or evaluation, why you dont think the current accomodations are not working or will not work, and what you would like to see. Ideally you want to tell them you believe he needs and IEP and would like another meeting to discuss it, or that you are not satisfied with their evaluation and would like further testing. I know for one of my daughters, in order to make sure she was ready for kindergarten and after some back and forth between me and the school, they had to pay for a county psychiatrist to be more thorough with their conclusions. Guess what? The doctor agreed with me on what would be best for her in kindergarten, and did not agree with everything the school said she needed.

You have to be a big pain in the as*, know your rights, not the outcome that you desire and be willing to fight for it. Again, the schools ultimately look at their bottom line spending. Sad but true, they want to spend the least amount of money per child as they can, while making sure that the students meet all of the state requirements so they can claim how wonderful their district is. Anyway, I am off on a tangent again, but have you check our wrights law yet?

So true! I am really tired of this. I did not get an IEP but a 504. I am very frustrated with the teacher and the school. Should I fight for an IEP?

dvdnvwls
03-05-14, 06:38 AM
You have to be a big pain in the as*, know your rights, not the outcome that you desire
(I'm guessing this meant "note the outcome that you desire", or "know the outcome that you desire".)

sarahsweets
03-05-14, 07:14 AM
YES!! know the outcome...the brain-to-typing ration is not so good.

(I'm guessing this meant "note the outcome that you desire", or "know the outcome that you desire".)