View Full Version : What is a addict?


mildadhd
01-28-14, 01:16 PM
I am wondering what is a addict?

Does calling someone an addict, mean the person has a mental health issue?



Peripherals

Fraser_0762
01-28-14, 01:39 PM
Addiction is very much a mental health issue.

When you can't stop repeating certain actions that are damaging to your health and your life, even although you want to stop. It's down to an imbalance of Dopamine and Serotonin.

You get so used to doing something, that it becomes the norm. If you try to stop, you experience withdrawal symptoms.

This doesn't just apply to drugs, it can apply to other addictions such as gambling, or even sex.

addthree
01-28-14, 01:44 PM
Bartman Said it better than anyone.

Stevuke79
01-28-14, 01:47 PM
:goodpost: It's an important question. I can interpret it a few ways, and I don't want to take the thread off topic. In what context are you asking?

Are you asking: "What makes someone an addict?" Like, if you take a certain medication that you can't function without, what differentiates you from an addict?

Or is it more: "Is addiction itself a mental health issue, or is addiction purely chemical and the mental health problems are purely side effects?"

Or am I missing the point entirely? :)

Conman
01-28-14, 01:50 PM
Addiction is defined as a continued repetition of a behavior despite adverse consequences including impaired control over substances and behavior, preoccupation with it and continued use despite consequences and denial of it.

typically with substances one has a compulsive need of said substance to function 'normally'. this allies with physical addiction where the body has to adjust to the substance by incorporating it into its normal functioning (like tolerance), as such abrupt stopping of it causes withdrawal sypmtoms to occur making you sick naturally until you either cold turkey it and return to 'normal' (altho for some substances your body can become permanently ****** up by it and withdrawal wont stop) or until said substance returns to the body.

however withdrawal itself can further perpetuate physical and psychological dependence with the goal to not experience withdrawal.

psychological addiction might not always be present with a physiological addiction from what ive seen. but psychological addiction alone could be enough to cause physical addiction due to psychosomatic aspects. as an example weed has 0 physical addiction aspects, however some people who think theyre addicted or think they 'need' to smoke weed can develop withdrawal symptoms or physical dependence. the mind is scary powerful.

as Fraser said, addiction doesnt just apply to substances, can apply to other things like sex, gambling, computer addiction, video games, and exercise too apparently.

ferrarl
01-28-14, 01:52 PM
And I'd like to add that often the actions you keep repeating that are damaging, often don't seem damaging or bad to you.

We refuse to see the reality because we depend on the action or behaviour so much. And sometimes we may genuinely believe that the action isn't bad for you because you aren't being honest with yourself.

Porn is a great example of something that's addicting but might not doesn't seem damaging to a person who is addicted. However, the way how you think of the opposite sex is distorted, other things don't make you that happy anymore, and you will always keep wanting more and more.

Fraser_0762
01-28-14, 01:56 PM
Anything that raises the release of Dopamine and Serotonin has the potential to cause addiction.

Thats why some people are complete adrenaline junkies. They're brought up into a lifestyle of risk taking and action. Attempting to stop, can lead to pretty extreme withdrawal symptoms, making it too painful for them to stop.

mildadhd
01-28-14, 02:04 PM
Thanks for all the responses, so far, I would like to think a bit, about the OP question with these responses/questions in mind. Before I reply. Thanks for everyones help.


Peripherals

daveddd
01-28-14, 02:34 PM
Addiction is defined as a continued repetition of a behavior despite adverse consequences including impaired control over substances and behavior, preoccupation with it and continued use despite consequences and denial of it.

typically with substances one has a compulsive need of said substance to function 'normally'. this allies with physical addiction where the body has to adjust to the substance by incorporating it into its normal functioning (like tolerance), as such abrupt stopping of it causes withdrawal sypmtoms to occur making you sick naturally until you either cold turkey it and return to 'normal' (altho for some substances your body can become permanently ****** up by it and withdrawal wont stop) or until said substance returns to the body.

however withdrawal itself can further perpetuate physical and psychological dependence with the goal to not experience withdrawal.

psychological addiction might not always be present with a physiological addiction from what ive seen. but psychological addiction alone could be enough to cause physical addiction due to psychosomatic aspects. as an example weed has 0 physical addiction aspects, however some people who think theyre addicted or think they 'need' to smoke weed can develop withdrawal symptoms or physical dependence. the mind is scary powerful.

as Fraser said, addiction doesnt just apply to substances, can apply to other things like sex, gambling, computer addiction, video games, and exercise too apparently.

its very important to understand the psychosomatic reasoning behind addiction

addiction is, killing emotional pain or gaining pleasure one normally can't obtain

no idea what chemicals respond in your brain to it, but i don't think it matters



the psychological aspect of addiction is the most important

to back that up, one would just have to check the relapse stats , of people leaving detox

the physical addiction is solved there, yet 95% relapse

liveandletdie
01-28-14, 04:22 PM
I always figure if your habit affects your ability to work, communicate, and function day to day then you are an addict...if you use drugs or alcohol from time to time or even on a low scale but regular basis but it does not affect your functioning in any of those areas...i wouldn't consider them an addict. Many would disagree...like someone who says if you are using a drug or alcohol everyday then you must be an addict. This topic could be interpreted in a vast number of ways....

There are many reasons people use drugs or alcohol....here are a few
peer pressure, to have fun, to fit in (is that the same as peer pressure?), to cope in a bad situation, to try and fix whats going on in their head, to forget what's going on in their head, they are bored.

As you can see being an addict could simply be an indicator that you have a mental disorder and have simply been trying to fix it yourself..(self medication as we all know it by now)

Either way goes back to how it affects your day to day life, if it affects your life in a very or moderately negative way then you're likely an addict.

But what if it benefits your life? Well then that would be a successful self medication and you likely do have a mental illness, however your methodology is frowned upon my society and also limited by society.

Lastly if you're a pretty addicted individual whether you have a mental illness or not (though long term heavy use can cause mental illness with most drugs) you're going to have a very hard time deciphering why you originally began your habit unless we are strictly speaking of someone else assessing another individual as to whether they are an addict.

Rebelyell
01-28-14, 09:22 PM
TO me addiction is a habit,habits which you get accustomed too too much and cant easily give up or do w out and they cost you lots of money and relationship problems.it becomes a problem when your habit interferes w your ability to function,get up for work or financially pay the bills because all the money is going towards this feel good thing that's really wrecking your life and others around you.I think alof of addiction have underlying mental health issues and there covered up or hidden or in denial because of there addictions.1 a addiction is stopped and the underlying cause or behavior or problem is found,while one will never be addiction free there can be a serious step forward to not only putting a stop to that behavior but getting help for the underlying problem/s as well.