View Full Version : The Math Disability


ellyodd
03-17-05, 08:21 PM
Have you ever joked about having "math dyslexia"?

4-6% of the world population is said to have dyscalculia, but it is extremely unknown. Most dyscalculics donít even know that this exists - even fever gets the help they need to succeed, in school, job situations and life.

Dyscalculia is in the WHO International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) - and that means, that this is an approved disability.

Hereís a list of common dyscalculia symptoms.





Normal or above normal verbal skills: reading, writing, spelling. Good in areas of science, until math is required. May be good at geometry.


Problems with time and direction. Having a hard time remembering schedules and keeping track of time. Gets lost easily and seem absent minded.


Bad at addition, subtraction, division and multiplication - may be able to do an assignment one day, and forget how to do it the next.


Cannot do taxes, budgeting or balance checkbooks - may be afraid of money.


Unable to remember math rules, concepts, order of operations and basic math facts.


May have problems with motor skills - can't remember sequences in aerobics/dance steps, fingering when playing an instrument etc.


Cannot remember rules and understand strategy in games and sports.
I have just opened url removed by moderator, please read forum guidelines - check it out!

(To the moderators; I'm still just a dyscalculic interested in making dyscalculia a known problem, nothing else ;))
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Emma S
03-18-05, 07:06 PM
I match all of those symptoms,and was told I do have an LD in maths by a pysch.
but as testing wasn't indepth,I didn't know whether mine was a specific LD or not.

I'm wondering who can diagnose learning difficulties-does it have to be a pysch.
or can someone,such as an SEN tutor-or someone else who works in a college diagnose it?
I've heard of colleges having dyslexia testing,so am wondering if other LDs can be done in the same way?
I don't want to have to go through more pysch. appointments as I hate the long waiting lists and would like to get it sorted with as soon as possible.

ellyodd
03-19-05, 02:17 AM
I match all of those symptoms,and was told I do have an LD in maths by a pysch.
but as testing wasn't indepth,I didn't know whether mine was a specific LD or not.

I'm wondering who can diagnose learning difficulties-does it have to be a pysch.
or can someone,such as an SEN tutor-or someone else who works in a college diagnose it?
I've heard of colleges having dyslexia testing,so am wondering if other LDs can be done in the same way?
I don't want to have to go through more pysch. appointments as I hate the long waiting lists and would like to get it sorted with as soon as possible.
Well, some schools can - and some schools can give you names for people who can help you. You have to ask them :)

If you are not in school, contact the learning disabilities association wherever you are. If you can't find them, just ask.

ellyodd
03-19-05, 02:27 AM
Well, I have good news for you - if you get tested, you can get a free bus pass where you live :eek: :cool:

URLS removed by ADMIN

Emma S
03-20-05, 11:34 AM
Well, some schools can - and some schools can give you names for people who can help you. You have to ask them :)

If you are not in school, contact the learning disabilities association wherever you are. If you can't find them, just ask.
Cheers Ellyodd!!! :)

I'll ask one of the tutors when I'm in tomorrow. :D

About the buss pass.........
I've got a free GMPTE travel pass already,so won't need one :) ,I go to south trafford college- http://www.stcoll.ac.uk/ -but I can't find anything on there about
getting LDs diagnosed,my sister confused me even more some time ago when she said only those in mental health (pyschologists,pyschiatrists etc) can diagnose LDs,would have tried to find out earlier if I knew different.

fasttalkingmom
03-20-05, 01:09 PM
I've been told I have that when I was tested for my ADD..........

Imbizzy2
08-19-05, 06:49 PM
Just wondering.. but how can you get a free bus pass??

Emma S
08-25-05, 03:41 PM
Just wondering.. but how can you get a free bus pass??
Is the RI in your location republic of Ireland?
I have found this information all about the pass:
http://www.welfare.ie/publications/sw40.html

You have to be getting one of the following benefits:
*Invalidity Pension
*Blind Pension
*Disability Allowance
*Unemployability Supplement or Workmen's Compensation with Disablement *Pension,for at least 12 months
*A social security invalidity payment,or a similar payment for at least 12 months

To qualify for the pass,according to that information.

Crazygirl79
08-25-05, 07:51 PM
This is me all over! *feels relieved*

casper
08-29-05, 11:56 AM
Math disabilites are very very common. It is probably one of the most frequently dxed LD. I also feel it has alot to do with the teacher. I had bad experiences with every one of my math teachers from grade school on. They either didn't belive in LD or ADD, or didnt teach, or were just there for another year to get their pension or whatever. It just killed me cause I bet i could have done much better if just one teacher would have cared!

bandie08
01-11-08, 09:58 AM
omg they all sound familiar i think i might have it.

lostranslation
01-12-08, 02:04 PM
Although I have never been officially diagnosed, I don't have much doubt that this applies to me. I have known about it for a number of years. My math ability is (maybe) third grade. I get lost all the time. If I get directions, it won't do any good if they are not written down. If someone askes me for directions...hahaha...not possible from me, even if I know how to get there. I cannot remember my own phone number, pin numbers, and sometimes can't even remember my home address. I now use a GPS to help me not get lost, and a PDA to keep track of other info. My husband takes care of bills, taxes, accounts, etc.

When I took the SAT test many years ago, my math score was 11, I think. I had no clue whatever on even one problem in that section.

This disability of mine has robbed me of being able to go to college, and I very nearly didn't graduate from H.S despite a GPA of 3.14. I am the only person in my family without at least a master's, if not a PHD or MD.

I have been called lazy, told that I just need to try harder, need to listen, use a calculator, etc. None of those help at all. I can't even add up the hours I work. Fortunately, our office manager rather grudgingly does that for me. (She is an accountant. It is easy for her. Why the attitude?)

The ritalin helps a tiny bit, but if I am at all anxious, or feel that I am being watched or judged, I just go blank. It's embarrasing, but manageable for now. Maybe one of these days, when we can afford it, I'll get diagnosed, but right now, it's more important to get our son some help.

dyingInside
01-13-08, 09:11 PM
My life was set back about 14 years because of ADD/math difficulties. I was undiagnosed throughout school and college. The net result of my struggles with math is that I can't ever have the career I always wanted (biologist/natural scientist). Everything else is just a job. The kicker is that I am able to understand math, I just have to learn it in my own way, but it is now too late- I can't go back and fix my transcript or be readmitted to the program that bounced me. Nevertheless, I am now teaching myself calculus at last, because I want to prove to myself I can do it.

I think many people's difficulties with math are due to the way math is taught- someone babbling away and scribbling on a chalkboard while students struggle to keep up with what's being written. As students focus on writing down the problems, they are unable to listen to what is being said. Later they go back and look at their notes which don't make much sense. For someone with ADD, trying to focus on math assignments at home is nearly impossible for any length of time, and worse if they didn't understand what was being said in class. I think math classes in primary/secondary school should be longer than other classes, so that the students can sit and do their homework in class quietly. I went from an F to an A in high school algebra because summer school allowed me to focus this way (plus they let me listen to metal on my walkman- that was back in the Un-PC days).