View Full Version : Advice about kindergarten & ADHD


Traci1979
03-29-14, 10:33 AM
My 4.8 year old was diagnosed with ADHD last week. I'm not surprised since my husband also has ADHD. My son is currently in special ed preschool program and I have his annual meeting in May. Basically they will tell me where he should be placed for kindergarten. I've already requested a copy of the report before I attend the meeting. My guess is that he will be main streamed and pulled out for language arts and math. However I feel that with a little support in the classroom he may be able to handle language arts or math.
He does have trouble focusing in the classroom but does not seem to have behavioral issues.
Am I going to need to fight for what I want?
Should I get an advocate?

It's also the first year with full day kindergarten

Any advice would be greatly appreciated

zette93
03-29-14, 12:09 PM
Your best bet it to network with other parents who have kids in your elementary school or district. It varies so much -- some districts push mainstreaming, even when there is a clear need for pullout, while others push special day classes even when there is potential for mainstreaming. I'm always in favor of using an advocate if you can afford one, if you can find a good one recommended by multiple other parents.

You'll also likely find that there is a big difference between preschool and elementary special ed. I've heard it becomes much less supportive of the family and of the individual needs of the child, more of a tendency to give a standard set of interventions to all. (For instance, both the non-verbal autistic kids and my kid who just needed a little help with l's, r's, and th's were getting 40 min of speech/week.) In my area, it seems that many elementary schools don't really take kindergarten seriously as far as providing academic services for special ed. I was told that it was because kindergarten attendance is not mandatory per state law, which made no sense to me.

Stevuke79
03-29-14, 12:15 PM
It really depends school district to school district. It's funny, my daughter (6 years old) has ADHD and had a "boyfriend" with ADHD and sensory issues. Now her boyfriend is in public school (so sad,.. Like Romeo and Juliette..), mainstreamed, getting help in the classroom and doing phenomenal.

So it depends on the school district in NJ but it could be really amazing.

Daydreamin22
03-29-14, 04:58 PM
Show the teacher strength and love for your child, because he has a gift. Truly, research the leaders of "add" go to positive psychology.org

sarahsweets
03-29-14, 07:48 PM
Before you decide that in class support is the best choice for your child consider this: Kindergarten is a building block to full blown education. You learn the basics and mostly you learn a lot of social skills stuff. If special ed could possibly help (meaning being pulled out for language arts and math) this would be the year where it could help exponentially without the negative effects (like students teasing a special ed child). At this age and up til about 3rd grade the kids really dont get that so and so goes to special ed for reading. When they get older, they can get meaner and thats when the teasing starts. My son and youngest daughter were both in special ed for adhd related issues even though they both tested into the gifted and talented program. So they received the special education classroom environment for their core subjects simultaneously while participating in the G&T program. This is what set them up for success because they needed that extra help and as much as my ego would have preferred them to stay in the same class and have an aide, the only good part about that would have been what I would be able to to tell the other mothers.
"Well Jake has some in class support for language arts and math but its not like he is pulled out for special ed!"
I am not saying you are doing this, its just an example. My son is about to graduate in June, has straight A's and enlisted in the marines. None of this would have been possible had I not taken the time to allow him to learn in a way that worked best for him in the early years.

momto2js
06-21-14, 04:10 PM
Before you decide that in class support is the best choice for your child consider this: Kindergarten is a building block to full blown education. You learn the basics and mostly you learn a lot of social skills stuff. If special ed could possibly help (meaning being pulled out for language arts and math) this would be the year where it could help exponentially without the negative effects (like students teasing a special ed child). At this age and up til about 3rd grade the kids really dont get that so and so goes to special ed for reading. When they get older, they can get meaner and thats when the teasing starts. My son and youngest daughter were both in special ed for adhd related issues even though they both tested into the gifted and talented program. So they received the special education classroom environment for their core subjects simultaneously while participating in the G&T program. This is what set them up for success because they needed that extra help and as much as my ego would have preferred them to stay in the same class and have an aide, the only good part about that would have been what I would be able to to tell the other mothers.
"Well Jake has some in class support for language arts and math but its not like he is pulled out for special ed!"
I am not saying you are doing this, its just an example. My son is about to graduate in June, has straight A's and enlisted in the marines. None of this would have been possible had I not taken the time to allow him to learn in a way that worked best for him in the early years.

My oldest is a rising 2nd grader and my youngest in entering K. It is not my experience that K is a social training ground any more. It was truly amazing what was expected of my 5 year old. They reviewed letters in the first 6 weeks and most of them were reading by Christmas at least a little. It was more like academic boot camp then a social exercise. By January, they were writing full sentences.

Because kids come to K, from all sorts of places, many of them were pulled out for one subject area or another, so that really wasn't an issue. At least in our district. My point is that in my recent experience, gone are the days where it is "just Kindergarten". This is where many of our young kids struggle because the expectations are just not appropriate for a large part of the population.