View Full Version : Obese at 18? Please help! (TW?)


NatyChan95
04-01-14, 05:31 PM
Hey guys. So a little backstory, if you haven't read my about me from the Tourette's forum (I don't have Tourette's, just slight tics maybe).

I'm 18 years old. I'm 5'2"/5'3", I weigh a whopping 225 lbs, and my BMI is 41.1, which is obese.

I was diagnosed with ADD at age 10 where I was put on concerta and then Adderall for 6 years or so. I am THE ONLY person in my immediate family that has a learning disability. (My baby bro got tested but he was clear.)

I think Adderall caused me to gain weight? I'm off Adderall as of last year at the end of the school year (March, 2013).

I've always been bigger than everyone. And of course, that's taken a BIG effect on me and my self esteem. I hate how my body looks. And I wish I were smaller so I would be "Normal.".

I do consider myself to be a compulsive eater (I eat when I'm not supposed to, when I'm bored, when I'm full, when I just ate, when I haven't eaten anything all day I stuff myself). I'm sick of it. I want out. I want to loose weight like my sister did.

Every time I find myself trying to follow a diet or restrict myself or exercise, I get lazy or I fall back into my usual routine.

Please help, I want this to stop.

I have an appointment with a new doctor on Friday who's going to talk to me about my ADD (and my tics which is irrelevant to this post sorry ^^;)

Thanks,
Nat

USMCcop
04-01-14, 06:49 PM
It's all mindset. You got to want it. If you want it, do it. Go on a diabetic diet. I dropped 30 pounds in 2 1/2 months. Prediabetes scared me so I took action.

NatyChan95
04-01-14, 06:54 PM
My regular doctor told me about 2 years ago if I continue on this path, I will develop diabetes. And I think one of my family members (not immediate, but like a grandmother i think) has it. I REALLY don't want it.

I'll see what I can do about the pre-diabetic diet, but maybe my new ADD medication will help me too. I dunno. I'm hoping everything will work out, and by the time I turn 20 next year in mid July, I'll be within a healthy weight and BMI.

USMCcop
04-01-14, 07:20 PM
I was diagnosed pre a couple months ago. Very near diabetic. (One point). I reversed it with diet alone. Next up, exercise.

Trust me when I say it's 90% diet. White carbs and refined sugar are pure poison.

NatyChan95
04-01-14, 07:33 PM
If you could please provide me with a list of white carbs, I'd really appreciate it.

I usually don't eat lots of sweets, but soda is something I know has loads of sugar. And soda is going to be a pain in the *** to kick.

I currently have 4 regular 20oz bottles (?) of Coca-Cola that I really wanna finish, so after that, i'll be sticking to juice and water only. I'll be making sure it's low sugar because I really wanna make sure I can drink something other than water.

I walk around school every day just to get to class, but that alone doesn't do squat. So I need to start getting on the stepper at home. I will also try to walk more when I'm out and at school too.

I googled a diabetic diet plan that I will be taking with me on Friday (to see if he can help me) and talk it out.

USMCcop
04-01-14, 08:07 PM
No prob. I was addicted to diet Pepsi. It has to go whether diet or regular. I now drink cold green tea and water. I drank 8-9 cans a day of diet Pepsi. It must go regardless of diet or regular.

I eat very little carbs, but when I do they are only healthy, whole grain (whole grain crackers, whole grain bread, oatmeal, etc). Even still you gotta limit those carbs.

Refined carbs, white bread, white crackers, white rice, sugar, fries, potatoes, and pasta must go. You won't drop weight or lessen your destiny of Type 2 Diabetes if you continue to eat that s***. They're unhealthy and poison to your body. That's why America is an epidemic of type 2 Diabetes. You will drop weight if you do so. As you're not yet diabetic, you can have more leeway on the whole grain items, but they still gotta be watched.

Veggies are carbs, but they're good to go based on the fiber. Fruits are pretty much good too. Bananas are full of sugar. Berries are great.

Eat lean red meat, pork, chicken, fish, all veggies, fresh fruits, nuts, and use olive oil.

Please be aware I'm not a nutritionist, but the diabetic diet is good for most everyone.

http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetic-food-list-best-worst-foods

USMCcop
04-01-14, 08:14 PM
Your body immediately views carbs as sugar-white or whole grain, but whole grain carbs slower. As soon as you eat, your blood sugar spikes and the insulin gets to work. If you don't consume a bunch of junk carbs, your body will start going after your stored fat.

Obviously caloric intake really matters, same as exercise.

Maybe ask your the doc about clonidine for your tics and the possibility of having Toreuretts (spelling???).

NatyChan95
04-01-14, 08:49 PM
Ah, thanks! I'll get to a nutritionist ASAP!

The doctor I'm seeing is only a psychologist and I think a neurologist as well, so I'll talk to him about Clondine (I'm looking at Kapvay)

I was originally planning to start small on a chewable tablet like Methylin, and those are small doses since I haven't taken medication for my ADD for nearly a year. But we'll discuss it.

Corina86
04-02-14, 09:49 AM
Have you ever had your thyroid checked? An over-active or under-active thyroid gland can cause ADHD like symptoms.

I'm not in your situation, but from what I've seen in me and my addiction to sugar, as well as other people's addiction to food, I think it truly is an addiction and should be treated as such. My father thinks that losing weight after his heart-attack is the hardest thing he ever did and the one thing he's most proud of (harder than college, job, kids or quitting cigarettes!).

Exercise will definitely help, diet as well, but I think you should also discuss this issue with a psychologist and maybe get some therapy. The biggest problem is not in your body, but in your brain. If you stick to diet, you will succeed, but giving up an addiction is never easy.

Fuzzy12
04-02-14, 11:03 AM
It's all mindset. You got to want it. If you want it, do it. Go on a diabetic diet. I dropped 30 pounds in 2 1/2 months. Prediabetes scared me so I took action.

I wish it was that simple. Maybe for some people it is, for many others it isn't and telling them that they just don't want it enough can often induce feelings of guilt and shame... which in my case just makes me want to eat more. :rolleyes:

Seeing a nutritionist is a very good idea. You can't eat more healthily if you don't know what "healthy" means.

Most compulsive eaters, I guess, are emotional eaters and food can be a very powerful emotional tool. Do you know what triggers your desire to eat when you are not hungry? You mentioned boredom, is there anything else? Do you eat when you are tired, when you are stressed or upset or angry? How do you feel before you eat when the urge hits, during eating and after eating? It might help getting therapy or counselling for your emotional issues (if you have any).

Regarding boredom, I guess an initial step would be to alleviate the boredom or to find healthier ways of dealing with it. What do you enjoy doing? When you are bored is there anything else you can do apart from eating?

Besides the emotional issues here are a few things that help me:

1. Fibre. Lots and lots of fibre (just make sure you drink plenty of water as well and increase your fibre intake gradually to avoid problems with your digestion). Fibre releases a steady stream of energy and it keeps you full and satiated without feeling tired. Good sources of fibre are oats (and other cereals), beans, flax seeds (this has worked wonders for me..you can just add a few tea spoons of ground flax seeds to your breakfast every day or any other meal. An added advantage is that it's high in omega 3), and any complex carbs

2. Replace all simple carbs with complex carbs (so for example, brown wholewheat bread instead of white bread, brown rice/pasta instead of white rice/pasta, etc.)

3. Replace sugary drinks with water or herbal tea

4. Drink plenty of water

5. Always have healthy snacks (like fruits) around and try to avoid keeping unhealthy snacks around you. Apples are brilliant. Not only are they super healthy but they are also fairly low in calories and very satiating.

6. Don't crash diet. They don't work and take a huge emotional toll. Don't plan any diet that you can't stick to long term. Make gradual small changes over time.

7. Exercise. It's true, when you want to lose weight, reducing your food intake will be much quicker than exercising but it might not be healthier. Exercise also helps with emotional regulation and makes you feel good so it can reduce comfort eating. I generally feel less hunger and appetite when I exercise more. Also, muscle mass uses more calories.

8. Go easy on yourself. It's ok to mess up your diet every once in a while as long as you get back on track again. Don't punish yourself but give yourself a pat on the back every time you make a healthier choice.

9. Try to be more mindful when you eat. Try not to gobble down food but make it an experience. Taste every bite you take and chew your food properly.

Dopes1
04-03-14, 12:32 AM
I wish it was that simple. Maybe for some people it is, for many others it isn't and telling them that they just don't want it enough can often induce feelings of guilt and shame... which in my case just makes me want to eat more. :rolleyes:

Seeing a nutritionist is a very good idea. You can't eat more healthily if you don't know what "healthy" means.

Most compulsive eaters, I guess, are emotional eaters and food can be a very powerful emotional tool. Do you know what triggers your desire to eat when you are not hungry? You mentioned boredom, is there anything else? Do you eat when you are tired, when you are stressed or upset or angry? How do you feel before you eat when the urge hits, during eating and after eating? It might help getting therapy or counselling for your emotional issues (if you have any).

Regarding boredom, I guess an initial step would be to alleviate the boredom or to find healthier ways of dealing with it. What do you enjoy doing? When you are bored is there anything else you can do apart from eating?

Besides the emotional issues here are a few things that help me:

1. Fibre. Lots and lots of fibre (just make sure you drink plenty of water as well and increase your fibre intake gradually to avoid problems with your digestion). Fibre releases a steady stream of energy and it keeps you full and satiated without feeling tired. Good sources of fibre are oats (and other cereals), beans, flax seeds (this has worked wonders for me..you can just add a few tea spoons of ground flax seeds to your breakfast every day or any other meal. An added advantage is that it's high in omega 3), and any complex carbs

2. Replace all simple carbs with complex carbs (so for example, brown wholewheat bread instead of white bread, brown rice/pasta instead of white rice/pasta, etc.)

3. Replace sugary drinks with water or herbal tea

4. Drink plenty of water

5. Always have healthy snacks (like fruits) around and try to avoid keeping unhealthy snacks around you. Apples are brilliant. Not only are they super healthy but they are also fairly low in calories and very satiating.

6. Don't crash diet. They don't work and take a huge emotional toll. Don't plan any diet that you can't stick to long term. Make gradual small changes over time.

7. Exercise. It's true, when you want to lose weight, reducing your food intake will be much quicker than exercising but it might not be healthier. Exercise also helps with emotional regulation and makes you feel good so it can reduce comfort eating. I generally feel less hunger and appetite when I exercise more. Also, muscle mass uses more calories.

8. Go easy on yourself. It's ok to mess up your diet every once in a while as long as you get back on track again. Don't punish yourself but give yourself a pat on the back every time you make a healthier choice.

9. Try to be more mindful when you eat. Try not to gobble down food but make it an experience. Taste every bite you take and chew your food properly.

Yeah. I really 'want' to gain weight, for some reason my 'want' doesn't seem to be a valid form of currency for my metabolism.

I eat like a horse and never gain weight.

HADDaball
04-03-14, 04:04 AM
Diets generally don't work.

In order to be a healthy weight and stay that way, you have to commit to long term changes in diet and lifestyle that support it.

You've given us some reasons for your eating. A good first step is to stop eating for any other reason than hunger.

One of the big things causing weight gain is too much sugar. A lot is hidden in processed foods.

What 12 things do you eat the most through the week?

NatyChan95
04-03-14, 11:19 AM
@Corina98 I have gotten it checked, but that was a couple years ago. I believe it was normal. But I can gladly get it checked again for good measure.

@HADDaball If my mom cooks, then usually it's rice and beans. I'm Puerto Rican, so we tend to eat at home. Chicken, ground beef, and or pork is a staple in our house to accompany the rice and beans. If my mom isn't making anything, my meal can range from something as simple as pan seared sausages and/or scrambled egg (or a single sunny side up egg) to a Hot Pocket, depending on what's available at home. I rarely ever eat from places like "Taco Bell", Burger King, or McDonalds. I also sometimes eat from "Subway" if my mom is in the mood or too lazy to cook. I don't like eating pizza as much.

HADDaball
04-06-14, 01:14 AM
OK.

Here's some suggestions:


Only have water for drinks unless special occasion.

Make rice and beans your staple.

No more hot pockets, eggs or sausages as meals. If you have them, have one spoon full with the rice and beans.

Don't add oil, fat, salt or sugar to your meals.

No dessert nor snacks between meals.

have a teaspoon full of chia seeds with breakfast



Try that for a few weeks.