View Full Version : Please help! Very new...


Mellymellls
04-02-14, 12:25 AM
I went to my doctor (new doc, first visit) with anxiety and depression. They gave me a check list and said my results were very high in both areas, so they gave me another test (ADHD test without telling me what it was) and she informed me I have adult ADHD, which it is true I am extremely distracted, forgetful (I swear my keys need to be surgically implanted on me I'm always losing them) and get agitated and confused. She prescribed me Adderal twice daily (30 mg) and wants to see me in a month.

Here's my question: I'm confused because I'm 27 and never once had a doctor suspected me to have this. As a child I always stayed focused easily and getting straight As was very easy for me and I maintained a 4.0 all through elementary and high school. I heard people/children with ADHD constantly get poor grades and are easily distracted/can't focus. I am sorry if I did not read any other information or have been misinformed, but I just can't wrap my head around going in with complaints of anxiety and coming out with a totally different problem. Is it possible to just get ADHD as an adult and not have it as a child? Or can a child be focused/get great marks and still have it?

I guess I am scared because I've never thought I had this, she (my doc) was pretty certain I had it because I have been treated for depression/anxiety with no results (nothing helped really) to the point of me being hospitalized for extreme anxiety back in 2008. Now I get so easily confused to the point where I forget where I am or how to get places I frequently go to, I make lists to remind myself and tasks I once found easy are difficult to get into for example sitting down to read a book.

I didn't think ADHD could suddenly pop out of nowhere I thought it was something you were born with. I was a very hyper child, but not to the point where it interfered with my daily life. I did have a very good structure/daily routine as a child (parents were strict with this) so I guess I am asking is it possible I just "developed" ADHD as an adult or was it always kind of there just never noticed by anyone?

Thank you for reading this! Feedback would be greatly appreciated!!

Unmanagable
04-02-14, 01:43 AM
Welcome to the forums. :) There's a lot of stuff to digest with a new diagnosis. Here's a link to a thread with general info to get you started, if you haven't already come across it:

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9767

sarahsweets
04-02-14, 04:04 AM
Youre right that adhd cant develop as an adult. Did you explain that you didnt have any problems as a child?

Corina86
04-02-14, 07:02 AM
All your symptoms of inattention, confusion, lousy memory could be very well due to anxiety and depression.

While there is a possibility that you do have a mild form of ADHD (or not), is wasn't a problem for you until you developed the other disorders. The doc should work harder on getting those treated, not give you medication which could possibly make your anxiety worse.

Lunacie
04-02-14, 08:53 AM
Some children do well in a structured environment like school,

especially if their parents also provide a consistent and structured home life.

When they leave home and school and loose that structure, it can become much harder to cope.

Other medical conditions should be ruled out, such as thyroid imbalance,

low levels of Vitamin D, Vitamin B, etc.


We are notorious at not recognizing our deficits, and think we're doing fine.

It might be interesting to read any old report cards you can find to see what remarks the teachers wrote.

I didn't remember it, but apparently I was quite a "Chatty Cathy" during primary school,

talking to seat mates when I should have been doing my work.

stef
04-02-14, 09:17 AM
I had no trouble with grades and also grew up in a very structured home;
yet always completely distracted and forgetful! the problems really showed once I was on my own. I think we all just assumed I would become organised "when I had to", but it never really happened! until the past few years (once I found out about ADHD.) I'm not diagnosed, though.

Tmoney
04-02-14, 09:27 AM
Lunacie makes agood point. If you were in a strict organized environment as a kid you may have gotten by un-noticed. I think sometimes in younger kids that females may not be as hyper or annoying as the boys and therefore may not be noticed as AD(H)D.

The one thing we know about this disorde ris that you cannot aquire it, you are born with it, and because it can be difficult to diagnose at times many people go un-noticed and untreated until that structured organized environement is gone and then the symptoms become more apparent.

I'm diagnosed AD(H)D with depression and anxiety! I'm healthy and happy today, but unfortunately I spent many years suffering in silence.

This forum nas become a form of medication for me. I hope you find the answers you're looking for.

I wish you good things.

dbellca82
04-02-14, 12:39 PM
I went to my doctor (new doc, first visit) with anxiety and depression. They gave me a check list and said my results were very high in both areas, so they gave me another test (ADHD test without telling me what it was) and she informed me I have adult ADHD, which it is true I am extremely distracted, forgetful (I swear my keys need to be surgically implanted on me I'm always losing them) and get agitated and confused. She prescribed me Adderal twice daily (30 mg) and wants to see me in a month.

Here's my question: I'm confused because I'm 27 and never once had a doctor suspected me to have this. As a child I always stayed focused easily and getting straight As was very easy for me and I maintained a 4.0 all through elementary and high school. I heard people/children with ADHD constantly get poor grades and are easily distracted/can't focus. I am sorry if I did not read any other information or have been misinformed, but I just can't wrap my head around going in with complaints of anxiety and coming out with a totally different problem. Is it possible to just get ADHD as an adult and not have it as a child? Or can a child be focused/get great marks and still have it?

I guess I am scared because I've never thought I had this, she (my doc) was pretty certain I had it because I have been treated for depression/anxiety with no results (nothing helped really) to the point of me being hospitalized for extreme anxiety back in 2008. Now I get so easily confused to the point where I forget where I am or how to get places I frequently go to, I make lists to remind myself and tasks I once found easy are difficult to get into for example sitting down to read a book.

I didn't think ADHD could suddenly pop out of nowhere I thought it was something you were born with. I was a very hyper child, but not to the point where it interfered with my daily life. I did have a very good structure/daily routine as a child (parents were strict with this) so I guess I am asking is it possible I just "developed" ADHD as an adult or was it always kind of there just never noticed by anyone?

Thank you for reading this! Feedback would be greatly appreciated!!


Welcome to the forums, you'll find many useful & helpful information along with members. Personally I thought the same way before but then I realized, the reason for this is because you are my age & when I was growing up ADHD wasn't really a thing. I mean it was, but not as recognized as it is today, let along the adult component. I attribute it to this & the fact its now getting the recognition and being seen for what it is when rather before it was more obscure. Kinda the same with other forms of mental issues, it takes awhile before it becomes mainstream. even in the medical community where it both started & it's niche lies. Again this is just my opinion, hopefully it helps

ADD me
04-02-14, 01:09 PM
Your traits/symptoms may not have caused a noticeable impairment in school, but they were there. You will discover more childhood signs as you go along.

Young adults are expected to be more independent and assume more adult responsibilities. This require the use of cognitive skills such as goal setting, planning, organizing, prioritizing, and self evaluation. Most ADHDers struggle in one or all of these, and this is why young adulthood (university and/or early career, first job) is a prime time for diagnosing ADHD for the first time, even though you have indeed had it all your life. AND it is more common for girls to be missed. Our hyperactivity behaviors are often not as disruptive as the boys behaviors are.

And as for your keys? Find a place -- near the door, or in your purse -- where you ALWAYS put them. Not usually. Not sometimes. ALWAYS. if you take one step past, go back.

Routine is one of an ADHDer's best friends.

Denvergal
04-02-14, 06:37 PM
Melly, I was 30 when I was diagnosed, I can totally empathize with your post! Like you, I got straight As early on in school, when I had a very structured environment.

Maybe when kids (especially girls) of our generation got good grades and were pretty well-behaved, our ADHD slipped under the radar? Growing up, my occasional blunders - like losing my backpack/homework - were overlooked, I was never punished, although I probably should have been. Maybe teachers saw me as an eccentric absent-minded little genius or something. ;-)

When I became an "adult", my comfy structured environment was gone, and college was six years of As, Fs, and severe anxiety. A word just popped into my head: Decompensation "the functional deterioration of a previously working structure or system." Maybe anxiety and depression are symptoms of stress, when our environments become less structured, or something else happens that's unfamiliar and we never learned the coping mechanisms?

What helped me a lot was doing everything I could to get rid of my stress and create a new structured environment, even when everything was kind of chaotic. I started going to a local place with a sauna, whirlpool, and massage twice a week, it drained all of my physical stress and made me able to handle things better. My keys still need to be surgically implanted, but I stashed extra sets of them and now only have meltdowns when the extra sets have become the primary sets. ;-)

Best of luck sweetie and let us know how you're doing. :)

daveddd
04-02-14, 10:52 PM
i can see the straight As if your bright, thats common here

staying easily focused is a tough one to see , thats pretty much the exact opposite of adhd

add to that, the late drastic increase in severity and hospitalization , it really doesn't seem like adhd at all

on the other hand, if the treatment works, thats all that matters

finallyfound10
04-03-14, 06:27 PM
Melly,

Welcome! What you are going through is very common here! I was diagnosed as an adult without the H of Hyperactivity but with the I of Inattentive.

As Denvergal so adeptly described: Decompensation. That is what happens to adults when what we've used for years and years no longer works and things don't go so well until we get diagnosed then at least there's a name for it. Then we can start to get treatment with meds and/or therapy. Getting accommodations at work or school or others areas of life to simply level the playing field.

ADD me is correct as well. As you think back over the years you will have "aha!" moments where you will realize where ADHD played a role in situations that didn't necessarily work out well for us.

I had issues with grades but I wonder how much of that would've been a much smaller issue had I been diagnosed as a child.

Mellymellls
04-04-14, 11:02 PM
Thank you all so much for the feedback my mother just told me recently there was a time a doctor wanted to put me on ADHD pills and she refused, so I guess that makes since as for the medication it makes me feel very focused and less forgetful it's interesting to note I've been on numerous anti depressants that didn't help at all, not even a little bit. My family is a bit judgmental they have their opinions and my sister swears up and down that because of my high marks as a child that I do not have ADHD. I understand that it is weird to be diagnosed as an adult but it's all making since to me now, I'm definitely more structured at work and my co workers have noticed. I just hope everything works out and I eventually meet my goals, my dreams. Thank you all!!!

bella21113
04-13-14, 04:56 AM
I went to my doctor (new doc, first visit) with anxiety and depression. They gave me a check list and said my results were very high in both areas, so they gave me another test (ADHD test without telling me what it was) and she informed me I have adult ADHD, which it is true I am extremely distracted, forgetful (I swear my keys need to be surgically implanted on me I'm always losing them) and get agitated and confused. She prescribed me Adderal twice daily (30 mg) and wants to see me in a month.

Here's my question: I'm confused because I'm 27 and never once had a doctor suspected me to have this. As a child I always stayed focused easily and getting straight As was very easy for me and I maintained a 4.0 all through elementary and high school. I heard people/children with ADHD constantly get poor grades and are easily distracted/can't focus. I am sorry if I did not read any other information or have been misinformed, but I just can't wrap my head around going in with complaints of anxiety and coming out with a totally different problem. Is it possible to just get ADHD as an adult and not have it as a child? Or can a child be focused/get great marks and still have it?

I guess I am scared because I've never thought I had this, she (my doc) was pretty certain I had it because I have been treated for depression/anxiety with no results (nothing helped really) to the point of me being hospitalized for extreme anxiety back in 2008. Now I get so easily confused to the point where I forget where I am or how to get places I frequently go to, I make lists to remind myself and tasks I once found easy are difficult to get into for example sitting down to read a book.

I didn't think ADHD could suddenly pop out of nowhere I thought it was something you were born with. I was a very hyper child, but not to the point where it interfered with my daily life. I did have a very good structure/daily routine as a child (parents were strict with this) so I guess I am asking is it possible I just "developed" ADHD as an adult or was it always kind of there just never noticed by anyone?

Thank you for reading this! Feedback would be greatly appreciated!!

To answer your question; or from my experience. I don't think ADHD can or is generally developed as an adult.. I am twenty seven also; and since I was little I suffered from Anxiety/hyperactive.. My doctors for a long time even through out middle school/high school just assumed it was severe anxiety. They decided to put me on an anti anxiety medication as well as anti depressant. I did well in school also; I managed to get a 4.0 as well. But did at times or do still find myself loosing things, forgetting where I put stuff.. And looking back, I think with school I always found away around it. Such as writing notes even when given handouts, actually writing rather than reading chapters.. I first went to a community college ( I was only 17).. Then when I transferred to a University; some of my teachers started to ask me or notice I should say. I started getting frustrated ( I thought as i was diagnosed it was just my anxiety ) however; long story short. I was tested a few times; and I do have ADHD. I have or was diagnosed a few years ago. I think the symptoms for anxiety/even depression but mostly anxiety can be mistaken or confused at times for ADHD. So the truth is; It could have been ADHD all a long, just undiagnosed or diagnosed as something else.. When I was diagnosed they put me on Adderall ( I'm not sure how your doing or like the effects?). As far as 70mg a day, but the past year or two I was prescribed Vyvanse. And for the first time my mind actually calmed down, it made it easier for me to have a normal schedule. Not as hyperactive, and also not as forgetful. It doesn't completly solve it, but Vyvance helped me a lot. It's a 12 hour, however maybe it could help. There is nothing wrong with having ADHD.. I know a lot of people are opposed to a stimulent drug; as i'm sure you know with how strict they are getting it filled. But as much as people may be against it; what they don't realize is that it actually does help people. I wish you the best of luck :) Sorry if i'm not much help, it all can be very confusing. But ADHD does not mean you would't have a 4.0, it has nothing to do with how smart you are. It is about managing your focus; we have a harder time with paying attention. Not IQ.