View Full Version : "just right" ocd


eclectic beagle
04-13-14, 01:46 PM
Can't find much literature on this, except for an article or two.

http://www.ocfoundation.org/uploadedFiles/MainContent/Find_Help/Just%20Right%20OCD%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf?n=3487

It's kind of therapeutic to put a label on my thoughts and behaviors. To know that others have similar issues.

What really resonated with me was the "reassurance-seeking" aspect of that cluster of symptoms, like using someone else's perspective to determine if there's an error in how I've perceived something.

Another behavior I can identify with is re-wording messages, or being too tired to revise, but am still left with a perpetual sense of "incompleteness". Obsessional slowness is another big one, losing time to repetitive thoughts.

I'm just wondering, does anyone here have similar issues? And, if so, could you describe them in detail?

I also have a working "theory" that extreme executive function impairments coupled with vigilance might give rise to just right ocd symptoms. I can't really justify that though.

BellaVita
04-13-14, 02:10 PM
Yes! I so have this!
Like silly example, I'll go through the whole day feeling like my hair isn't perfect. And I'll try to fix it throughout the day and it's never "perfect enough."

Like most of my symptoms revolve around perfectionism....

I have all of the symptoms listed...well except I'm somewhat confused with "obsessional slowness" - does that mean taking a while to do things due to obsessing? Cuz yeah, I totally do that.

I am realizing, throughout the day my mind obsesses with many things that I feel "incomplete" about...like they're not perfect enough.

One of my most annoying symptoms is counting, I think.

And the loops that play in my head over and over again.

Another annoying one is checking and rechecking soooo many times to make sure a job(like cleaning the bathroom mirror and checking over and over for specks...or cleaning a mess and going over the area lots of times with my eyes to make sure I got everything) I did or something I wrote is "perfect."

eclectic beagle
04-13-14, 02:29 PM
I have all of the symptoms listed...well except I'm somewhat confused with "obsessional slowness" - does that mean taking a while to do things due to obsessing? Cuz yeah, I totally do that.

And the loops that play in my head over and over again.

Another annoying one is checking and rechecking soooo many times to make sure a job(like cleaning the bathroom mirror and checking over and over for specks...or cleaning a mess and going over the area lots of times with my eyes to make sure I got everything) I did or something I wrote is "perfect."

I took obsessional slowness to mean, repetitive thoughts and behaviors that interfere with productivity. Like, instead of re-writing a sentence ten times, I could've moved on to the next sentence. Or, just obsessing about re-writing takes precious time.

But yes! There's a pervasive sense of incompleteness that accompanies most things I do, and it's pretty irritating. Monitoring thoughts and behaviors helps, but it isn't full proof.

dvdnvwls
04-13-14, 04:13 PM
"Obsessional slowness" appears to mean "having your tasks (and your whole day) slowed down, because you frequently get stuck for a long time on some thoughts or actions"

eclectic beagle
04-13-14, 04:49 PM
I think that was basically what I was getting at, yeah.

mrs. dobbs
04-14-14, 04:19 AM
Good stuff MentalNomad. My psych was just relating her hypothesis of how my OCD is an outgrowth/abd or coping mechanism of ADHD. I agreed with the hypothesis explaining that it feels like my broken prioritization functions cause alot of it. So that 'something is wrong' alarm is going off constantly and I hoard thoughts or try to cover all bases to bring structure, sense, categories and filters... basically to simulate executive function.

The reassurance cluster, specifically checking others view of things to make sure I have a balanced perspective-- I had no idea that was an official OCD thing! I am so happy to discover that because I am so tired of checking with my internal panel (what would so and so do/think), trying to decide how and what I 'should' think of things and constantly going to others for reassurance.

Does anyone have the need to overexplain because you fear having missed something/not having covered all bases?

hurricane92
04-14-14, 09:52 PM
Counting things out, yes. Examining directions over and over.

eclectic beagle
04-15-14, 01:33 AM
Does anyone have the need to overexplain because you fear having missed something/not having covered all bases?

Yes, I do. The communication issue might be over the simplest idea, and while the other person agrees, it's like a sense of their comprehension being off--only because I don't think I explained things correctly. This has probably gotten milder over the years, but is still sort of prevalent.

Well, it's a little late here. I'll extend on this later.

BellaVita
04-15-14, 01:38 AM
Does anyone have the need to overexplain because you fear having missed something/not having covered all bases?

Yes, and if I *have* missed something I can't go without correcting it....

Even tiny little mistakes (ones that aren't really "mistakes") I have to correct.

BellaVita
04-15-14, 01:39 AM
Yes, I do. The communication issue might be over the simplest idea, and while the other person agrees, it's like a sense of their comprehension being off--only because I don't think I explained things correctly. This has probably gotten milder over the years, but is still sort of prevalent.

Well, it's a little late here. I'll extend on this later.

Yes sensing their comprehension behind off - I do that too! :)

stef
04-15-14, 04:30 AM
I just read this out of curiosity (I really don't have any OCD traits altough I see how this could happen).

But OMG, my husband...
washing hands, doing dishes etc. and he is always "replacing" objects - I mean putting them back down, just so. (even though our apartment is quite cluttered and that doesn't bother him at all).
Whenever he sits down anywhere at dinner (our place, friends', restaurant) he moves every item a few centimeters/milimeters, until they are centered "just right".

fracturedstory
04-16-14, 02:28 AM
I just read this out of curiosity (I really don't have any OCD traits altough I see how this could happen).

But OMG, my husband...
washing hands, doing dishes etc. and he is always "replacing" objects - I mean putting them back down, just so. (even though our apartment is quite cluttered and that doesn't bother him at all).
Whenever he sits down anywhere at dinner (our place, friends', restaurant) he moves every item a few centimeters/milimeters, until they are centered "just right".
I absolutely hate it when people move objects from their rightful place, especially my food int he fridge. I think most of little rage outbursts are over items in the kitchen not being in their rightful place.

fracturedstory
04-16-14, 02:33 AM
Hmm, I wonder if this 'just right' feeling has anything to do with my anxiety about having to do something that may not be on my mind but once I complete this task I feel much better?

For example if I want to read something but put it off for ages I will feel restless and unable to focus on anything else until I read it. It's usually a Marvel Fact File. Also, it happens when I have a lot of TV shows to catch up on. Even when I need to contact bands to get me special access to shows.

stef
04-16-14, 03:22 AM
I absolutely hate it when people move objects from their rightful place, especially my food int he fridge. I think most of little rage outbursts are over items in the kitchen not being in their rightful place.

It took me a long time to understand this (having no "rightful place" for anything myself, my things usually have "2 potential areas"...). It truly bothers him. I've been way more careful with this recently, and especially with things in the kitchen. (silverware - the brita water pitcher thing -scissors!)

mrs. dobbs
04-16-14, 05:18 AM
Hmm, I wonder if this 'just right' feeling has anything to do with my anxiety about having to do something that may not be on my mind but once I complete this task I feel much better?

For example if I want to read something but put it off for ages I will feel restless and unable to focus on anything else until I read it. It's usually a Marvel Fact File. Also, it happens when I have a lot of TV shows to catch up on. Even when I need to contact bands to get me special access to shows.

If I am understanding you correctly, I think I have this... and bad. I am unable to focus on anything else until I have done some looming background thing that I have put off. While I am attempting to do that thing, however, there are other things that seem even more important. The result is that everything gets backed up and I constantly feel anxious and like "I can't."

Haha stef "2 potential areas" I like that.

fracturedstory
04-16-14, 09:59 PM
Yep. You're right. It's like I have to do detective work on my own wants and desires. I'm constantly thinking over what I really have wanting to be doing lately.

eclectic beagle
04-24-14, 12:24 AM
Psych described me as "hyper-vigilant", which come to think of it seems to fuel that sense of incompleteness.