View Full Version : Academia: ADHD+Perfectionism= Struggle Town


neetah
04-22-14, 11:19 AM
Im Going into my last year of uni, the pressure is on. Much more is demanded of me now and im finding that what started out as mild generalized anxiety and feelings of insecurity about my academic abilities etc has worsened.

I have always taken Dexedrine for my ADHD, it changed my life, it enabled me to get good grades in high school, hold down a steady part time job and make it into uni...But it has never really been a magic bullet for me at uni. It fixes some things and aggravates others. This is particularly noticeable when it comes to writing academic papers and the long hours of reading and research i have to do...

In general I have been getting excellent grades but this is because I am really trying hard and also i am only doing 75% of a full load (pacing myself).
My teachers see me as a conscientious student but they do not see how stressed I get behind the scenes or that I spend every waking hour studying. I often have to go and get doctors certificates and ask for extensions on deadlines because i just cant handle multiple assessments being due around the same time.

Where stimulants help me with being disciplined and organized they also aggravate certain areas of my personality which can sometimes be counterproductive. Such as:

-Perfectionism: this is the biggest hindrance to writing an essay, makes me a slow reader/writer and causes me to be really inefficient at completing tasks, because i beat around the bushes taking very precise notes and ordering them in a certain way, or pondering over statements to make sure that i have properly understood them and remembered them. Imagining certain theories into a hypothetical context to help it gel... Sometimes staring out the window for 15 minutes at a time before i continue reading.

-Hyperfocus: Once i actually start the assignment, whatever it is im writing about, i will live and breath it. And wake up thinking about it in the morning. Yet it will take me way too long to get what it is that i want to say organised on paper in a structured way. I think I find it hard to even start to write until i feel i have understood and memorized every intricate detail of a theory. Whereas someone normal would be happy to just take some rough notes, and dot points and work from that, making a start on it right away.

-Rumination: This gets worse as dexedrine wears of in the evening and when im trying to sleep. Or if something is on my mind Dexedrine will make me ruminate about that instead of focusing on the task at hand.

-Procrastination: This one i have figured out is rooted in anxiety about the difficulty of tasks and insecurities about my intellectual abilities.

-too emotionally sensitive, cry at drop of hat, get over exited about things, anger outbursts. On the one hand I can be very empathetic, to the point of crying at something i saw on TV. Yet when angry i can lash out at the ones i love, especially when stressed about an impending deadline and an impossible to answer essay question.

I have come to realize that a big part of my inability to concentrate is due to anxiety.

My doc gave me a small dose of xanax to use occasionally when I need to get to sleep. Xanax has helped immensely in managing my sleeping patterns.
Recently I took some xanax and dexedrine together before writing an essay and found the combination worked much better than dex alone.

If my anxiety is bothering me in general (not just at night) then wouldn't it be better if I took something longer acting and less addictive and which has a more consistent effect? like an SSRI...

Something that will work around the clock and complement the focus that dexedrine gives me, by allowing me to move on and not get bogged down and tied up the irrelevant details of things.

If an SSRI works for my anxiety then I wouldn't need any xanax or other drugs for sleeping issues etc. I heard it is easy to get hooked on benzoz and i have been using them even more regularly for sleep nowadays.

My main concern is that I want to be more efficient at academic writing, That would make my life at Uni a whole lot easier. I am going to be doing honours next year...If I have this much trouble writing a minor 2000 word essay, i have no idea how i will cope with my 15000 word thesis next year.

a 2000 word essay usually takes me at least 6 days to write, and that is working on it for 10 hours a day non stop. Usually i fall behind in the course work (weekly readings, lectures etc) when i have to do an essay.

I have read mixed reports about what SSRIs do to peoples abilities to write and their motivation. Some said it dulled their imagination and others said it allowed them to let go and go with the flow.

Can anyone relate to my struggles with writing and the competitive academic environment? Would love to hear your suggestions on techniques for writing, opinions about what different meds do etc. :thankyou:

AshT
04-22-14, 12:31 PM
Perfectionism can sometimes be a form of procrastination, or caused by fear of failure. Not sure if those are related to you, haven't read your whole post yet as on phone. The now habbit talks a lot about perfectionism :).

Ive yet to find a solution to your reading/note taking issues. Every adhder ive met has the same problem with getting stuff organised on paper. Have you been checked for dyslexia btw? Remember, all the information in the world doesnt mean better decisions or outcomes, it can actually be worse according to blink:power of thinking without thinking. One example was when the USA pitted two war teams against each other - one with all the intel, money, ships, best computer analyst. All vs the second guy, who had next to nothing, no computers, middle of nowhere. But had been a commander in vietnam and trained on the front line. He won the training war, quickly, acting on little information. Not to say this is always the best idea...but let your intuition guide you :). Its the most powerful thing we have!

AshT
04-22-14, 12:32 PM
p.s if it helps, I have dyslexia and adhd. Similar problems to you. Just finished a 33k thesis :)

neetah
04-22-14, 01:58 PM
I have been over a few different dyslexia checklists.... and i have some of the characteristics but not others.

I am a really slow reader (around 220 wpm) and i lose my place on the page a lot. Or have to re-read paragraphs. It seams like sometimes i am reading the words but simultaneously daydreaming about something else completely unrelated (multiple trains of thought). This might just be ADD though.

I have neat handwriting and am very good at speech, including foreign languages.
Im bad at copying down long sequences of numbers though.
Not great at recognizing faces of people i have recently met either.
but Pretty good at reading maps

I think i have a lot of fear of failure despite getting good grades time and time again...
I think im not really intelligent but a poser who's just getting good grades by pulling lots of strings behind the scene. I also have the luxury of stability and quiet in my home and not much other responsibility in my life other than uni. So that helps. I often wonder how other students who simultaneously work and raise children whilst studying can manage.


How do you manage dyslexia

AshT
04-22-14, 04:19 PM
I have been over a few different dyslexia checklists.... and i have some of the characteristics but not others.

I am a really slow reader (around 220 wpm) and i lose my place on the page a lot. Or have to re-read paragraphs. It seams like sometimes i am reading the words but simultaneously daydreaming about something else completely unrelated (multiple trains of thought). This might just be ADD though.

I have neat handwriting and am very good at speech, including foreign languages.
Im bad at copying down long sequences of numbers though.
Not great at recognizing faces of people i have recently met either.
but Pretty good at reading maps

I think i have a lot of fear of failure despite getting good grades time and time again...
I think im not really intelligent but a poser who's just getting good grades by pulling lots of strings behind the scene. I also have the luxury of stability and quiet in my home and not much other responsibility in my life other than uni. So that helps. I often wonder how other students who simultaneously work and raise children whilst studying can manage.


How do you manage dyslexia

Interesting you say about faces. I have a similar problem with facial recognition in that sense. If i've met them a few times though it's generally OK.

I would really recommend reading the "Now habbit". You don't even have to read the whole thing - first 3 chapters set me on fire!

With medication, have you tried getting involved in work, then taking it? I've heard some people saying that meds can focus them on the wrong thing and it can be hard to stop it! I'm wondering actually, if your dose is too high? If my dose is correct, I have reduced emotions and can think more rationally and logically; and actually make decisions based on logic and rationality.

Have you had a formal dyslexia assessment? 50% of people with ADHD have dyslexia and the vice versa is also true.

I don't have many tips/etc about how I manage my dyslexia atm unfortunately =(. I've been trying to find all sorts of information but generally struggled to find good resources. I've attended Dyslexia workshops but they wern't that useful. It's actually easier finding stuff for ADHD! The best thing so far is using bullet points to get the big picture, then iterating over them and adding more details/layers. It's a great way of writing more concisely as well and I get less lost on tangents; I just have to bring myself back to the original bullet point i'm writing about =).

You say that you spent 10 hours a day working non-stop on a 2k word essay. Could you us through what you do during those hours or days? Do you have a general process or ways to limit yourself? Have you recorded what it is you're doing and spending your time on to see where you can improve and what may go wrong?

Often it's so hard to observe ourselves when we're in the situation. Put it out there on paper and you can look at your techniques more objectively and notice patterns.

Also, this was a cool read: 2k words to 10k words a day!
http://thisblogisaploy.blogspot.co.uk/2011/06/how-i-went-from-writing-2000-words-day.html

neetah
04-22-14, 11:27 PM
OK thanks I have put the now habbit on my mid semester break reading list. :)

Yeh timing of taking meds is important. Its a technique i have used and it works. Give myself 15 minutes to check facebook, emails and forums, get that out of my system, .....Then start to focus on the essay at the moment of taking meds. I never take my meds as soon as i wake up as others do, because that first boost they give me is the best time to write and be productive.

I havent had a dyslexia assessment, I imagine that i would have to go and see a specialist for that and as there doesnt appear to be any good evidence based treatments for it, so i dont really see the benefit in paying all that money just to have a definitive answer. As you say you yourself are still searching for a solution to that...

I have been on these meds for years and have played around with the dosage alot. I find taking 1x 5mg tab every couple of hours to be sufficient, any more than that and it really affects my ability to sleep at night.

I really need to look at my techniques for writing. I think your bullet points technique is a good way to go about it. But often I do find it hard to put things into my own words when the literature has always said things so beautifully. Usually my drafts are a bunch of copied quotes being reordered to look like an original argument and then reworded to flow better and not plagiarize. I usually get high marks but this method is taking way too long.
I study anthropology, the literature gets quite abstract and confuses the hell out of me as often authors will argue the same thing but will have coined their own terms for things. Most of the literature is sometimes based on big questions with no real definitive answers too...

I would normally spend the first 3 days reading as many articles as I can, highlighting underlining and circling the main points i would like to use. Then I go about constructing a draft from those. But yeh the main issue is putting things in my own words.

I have pinned that blog page and will read it tonight after studying.

AshT
04-23-14, 12:05 PM
OK thanks I have put the now habbit on my mid semester break reading list. :)

Yeh timing of taking meds is important. Its a technique i have used and it works. Give myself 15 minutes to check facebook, emails and forums, get that out of my system, .....Then start to focus on the essay at the moment of taking meds. I never take my meds as soon as i wake up as others do, because that first boost they give me is the best time to write and be productive.

I havent had a dyslexia assessment, I imagine that i would have to go and see a specialist for that and as there doesnt appear to be any good evidence based treatments for it, so i dont really see the benefit in paying all that money just to have a definitive answer. As you say you yourself are still searching for a solution to that...

I have been on these meds for years and have played around with the dosage alot. I find taking 1x 5mg tab every couple of hours to be sufficient, any more than that and it really affects my ability to sleep at night.

I really need to look at my techniques for writing. I think your bullet points technique is a good way to go about it. But often I do find it hard to put things into my own words when the literature has always said things so beautifully. Usually my drafts are a bunch of copied quotes being reordered to look like an original argument and then reworded to flow better and not plagiarize. I usually get high marks but this method is taking way too long.
I study anthropology, the literature gets quite abstract and confuses the hell out of me as often authors will argue the same thing but will have coined their own terms for things. Most of the literature is sometimes based on big questions with no real definitive answers too...

I would normally spend the first 3 days reading as many articles as I can, highlighting underlining and circling the main points i would like to use. Then I go about constructing a draft from those. But yeh the main issue is putting things in my own words.

I have pinned that blog page and will read it tonight after studying.

OK thanks I have put the now habbit on my mid semester break reading list.
It'll probably be the best few hours you spend. For the next 2 weeks after, I was more productive then i've ever been in my entire life! Same for one of my ADD friends who read it.

I havent had a dyslexia assessment, I imagine that i would have to go and see a specialist for that and as there doesnt appear to be any good evidence based treatments for it, so i dont really see the benefit in paying all that money just to have a definitive answer. As you say you yourself are still searching for a solution to that...

I have been on these meds for years and have played around with the dosage alot. I find taking 1x 5mg tab every couple of hours to be sufficient, any more than that and it really affects my ability to sleep at night.
Assessment for me was fortunately free from the university. But, there are definite benefits i've found from finding out I had dyslexia. Firstly, knowing you have a definite problem stops a load of guess work. Oh, Colour overlays: reduces the amount of time I have to re-read stuff and helps me concentrate a lot better. Not sure if these would be useful for you.

I'm sure there are loads of other things that could come from it. You may be able to find better resources than I have, i've just not actively looked as much as I have for ADHD, yet. However, as said, I didn't have to worry about paying for it!

I really need to look at my techniques for writing. I think your bullet points technique is a good way to go about it. But often I do find it hard to put things into my own words when the literature has always said things so beautifully. Usually my drafts are a bunch of copied quotes being reordered to look like an original argument and then reworded to flow better and not plagiarize. I usually get high marks but this method is taking way too long.
Have you tried reading stuff and moving away from the computer/source and trying to re-write the important information you've read? It might help reduce/stop paraphrasing and encourage information to be taken in at the point of reading it? I'm doing a lot of this at the moment, slowly i'm finding i'm taking more information in when reading :).

Yeh timing of taking meds is important. Its a technique i have used and it works. Give myself 15 minutes to check facebook, emails and forums, get that out of my system, .....Then start to focus on the essay at the moment of taking meds. I never take my meds as soon as i wake up as others do, because that first boost they give me is the best time to write and be productive.
Oh? Only the first boost?
Hmm...with meds do you ever find, for example, if you were to take them and then go on facebook first, you'd be able to stop yourself and think "No, now's not the time for that, back to work"...or would you have to be focused on work first? Do you feel they give you more self control over stuff?

In regards to putting things in your own words and the trouble with that. Can you pint point exactly what the problem is with putting things into your own words? :). I'm assuming if you were creative writing, you wouldn't have this issue?

neetah
04-23-14, 11:56 PM
Have you tried reading stuff and moving away from the computer/source and trying to re-write the important information you've read? It might help reduce/stop paraphrasing and encourage information to be taken in at the point of reading it? I'm doing a lot of this at the moment, slowly i'm finding i'm taking more information in when reading :).

Yes, you are right about that ^^. But i need to figure out a system for cataloging which information comes from which source as im learning it so as not to end up with a huge text written from my own memory in my own words and then no idea how to in text reference it. My current system involves colored highlighting with each source responding to a different color. So my drafts are pretty colorful but i feel this helps to not get lost at the time of referencing.


Re Meds:
No not really, They give me power to concentrate but not to direct my concentration. its very easy for me to waste the first boost on forums and facebook and just general web surfing. or dabbling in other interests. Or even if i am doing my assignment, to focus on the wrong part. i.e. spending 2 hours reading about something that is related but which i only need to reference one sentence of.

putting things in own words:
OK so if there is something i put in my own words. I think i still need to reference where the info has come from i.e. if you are explaining a concept for the starting point of an essay... neoliberalism is a economic political theory that aims to... bla bla bla

I pretty much wrote it in my own words but is inspired from reading various descriptions. But being an undergrad they'd expect that to be referenced. So then I have to go searching for something that looks similar just to put a ref in there. and that takes time tooo

VeryTired
04-24-14, 09:52 AM
neetah--

I read your post with interest. I don't have ADHD (I'm here because my partner does), but I am a professor, so I spend lots of time working with students who have issues similar to yours. I am very impressed at your dedication to your studies, and at the success you report. And I feel sympathy for you since you report it can be a tough struggle.

Here's what I say to my students: success in school work requires different things from different people. Students normally greatly underestimate how much work it is to write a research paper, let's say. They start a day or two before it's due, although I tell them repeatedly and in writing that they need to start in the first week of the semester to shape their topic, do research, build an argument, write a draft, get feedback, etc. Students who follow those directions put in many hours--as you say you do. They also learn a lot and typically produce strong work.

From my perspective, evaluating the papers, it is usually the slow hard workers who are able to grow more in doing the assignment and they often have much better work to show than the brilliant, everything-is-easy-for-me types. Of course I understand that one student may put in twice as much time as another for the same result--and some students feel they are running an arduous obstacle course to do that hard work at all. Some care to make that effort, some choose otherwise.

To me, yours sounds like a success story. You'll cope with your thesis by working with your advisor to break it into chunks--chapters! You'll do them one at a time, and they will be no harder than the papers you are now righting. The only difference is they are all on aspects of the same topic, and they fit together. But exactly what you described as your method will get you through it if you are determined.

The perfectionism, rumination, and hyperfocus are all potentially useful tools in writing a thesis. The anxiety, emotion and procrastination are not advantages at all--and almost everyone who writes a thesis has at least some of this. Talk to your doctor about how best to manage this. Talk to your thesis advisor about the fact that you face more challenges than many other students in a task like a thesis, and ask for help from the start.

I wouldn't know about your meds, but I can tell you that everything you wrote sounds like issues you can deal with academically as much as medically. And if I had to bet, my money would be on you working incredibly hard, having a bunch of stress in the process, and producing a successful thesis in the end. You can do this!

neetah
04-25-14, 04:45 AM
Awww thanks VeryTired. i often compare myself to those "everything-is-easy-for-me types" who can hold down 4 units, work full time and juggle multiple responsibilities.
I am rewarded for my efforts though by the fact that my degree is enriching my entire outlook on life and the world around me, because i take the pursuit of knowledge to be a core aspect of my being rather than merely seeing it as a stepping stone towards material ends. Thanks for your advice + encouragement.

neetah
04-26-14, 02:28 AM
Actually i kinda figured out that i find everything too interesting and focus read everything rather than skimming and looking for relevant information. Sometimes I notice im doing that and try to pick out what is really relevant, but it all seems relevant. Then when i start writing i go back to check the bits I've highlighted and about 70% of the book or article is highlighted and underlined.

AshT
04-26-14, 11:24 AM
neetah--

I read your post with interest. I don't have ADHD (I'm here because my partner does), but I am a professor, so I spend lots of time working with students who have issues similar to yours. I am very impressed at your dedication to your studies, and at the success you report. And I feel sympathy for you since you report it can be a tough struggle.

Here's what I say to my students: success in school work requires different things from different people. Students normally greatly underestimate how much work it is to write a research paper, let's say. They start a day or two before it's due, although I tell them repeatedly and in writing that they need to start in the first week of the semester to shape their topic, do research, build an argument, write a draft, get feedback, etc. Students who follow those directions put in many hours--as you say you do. They also learn a lot and typically produce strong work.

From my perspective, evaluating the papers, it is usually the slow hard workers who are able to grow more in doing the assignment and they often have much better work to show than the brilliant, everything-is-easy-for-me types. Of course I understand that one student may put in twice as much time as another for the same result--and some students feel they are running an arduous obstacle course to do that hard work at all. Some care to make that effort, some choose otherwise.

To me, yours sounds like a success story. You'll cope with your thesis by working with your advisor to break it into chunks--chapters! You'll do them one at a time, and they will be no harder than the papers you are now righting. The only difference is they are all on aspects of the same topic, and they fit together. But exactly what you described as your method will get you through it if you are determined.

The perfectionism, rumination, and hyperfocus are all potentially useful tools in writing a thesis. The anxiety, emotion and procrastination are not advantages at all--and almost everyone who writes a thesis has at least some of this. Talk to your doctor about how best to manage this. Talk to your thesis advisor about the fact that you face more challenges than many other students in a task like a thesis, and ask for help from the start.

I wouldn't know about your meds, but I can tell you that everything you wrote sounds like issues you can deal with academically as much as medically. And if I had to bet, my money would be on you working incredibly hard, having a bunch of stress in the process, and producing a successful thesis in the end. You can do this!

Super helpful info thanks!

AshT
04-26-14, 11:29 AM
Actually i kinda figured out that i find everything too interesting and focus read everything rather than skimming and looking for relevant information. Sometimes I notice im doing that and try to pick out what is really relevant, but it all seems relevant. Then when i start writing i go back to check the bits I've highlighted and about 70% of the book or article is highlighted and underlined.
Tbh, i've realised it's really hard to know what's important until you know the field of what you're doing a bit better.

It's metacognition I think; knowledge about knowledge...we don't get that from reading a few papers but reading around the field, reading things a few times. What i've started doing this last month is, well, not worrying about the 70% of stuff highlighted. Doing that first, then re-reading and note-taking after, when I have a better idea of what's going on. Often what I didn't think was important was and the vice versa. So if you read it twice and find you highlight 20% of the stuff twice, you know to take out that 20% =).

Took me a while to realise that for myself, because so often I expect myself to just know everything at the moment I do it, i'm impatient and don't want to have to re-read and write notes after. I want to write them now, during my reading.

But, it's like you going and reading up on neuroscience or something...how would you know what's important until you read around/know the specific field a bit better? :). It will all be new info, so will all seem like it's important!

p.s if you have a tablet, have you tried evernotes pdf highlighter? I find it bloody awesome. It highlights stuff in pdfs and then pulls out all the highlighted information, organised by colour and sticks it at the top :D.

AshT
04-26-14, 12:34 PM
p.s if you do find any additional strategies that do work for you. Please do share :D.

neetah
04-27-14, 05:53 AM
I do the same thing, but using adobe reader for windows. It allows you to highlight in different colors and different transparencies. So i will usually change the opacity of my highlighting depending on how important something is (so that the more important it is the more vibrant the color will be), that helps to guide my eyes to the right info when re-reading. And then ill use a separate color all together to highlight things which I am planning on quoting/citing. i also use the little caption tool to write notes in the margin e.g. "this part could be used for the conclusion as it illustrates bla bla bla, or this relates to so and so's notion of such and such".

yeh it looks like i do have a good system going after all i just need to pick up the pace a little and stop fretting i guess.

Just downloading ever note to give it a try too :)

What about doing references. People have mentioned using one note, but i dont see how it could be any quicker than compiling the reference list from scratch anyway. especially if you're using new materials each time anyway.

neetah
04-27-14, 05:56 AM
Also i changed the color on the background of my PDF reader from white to a soft beige i find it softer on the eyes for long periods of time....

And also installed a programm called F.lux which puts a rosy tint over the computer screen so that the blue light doesnt interupt brain chemistry.

Another thing i have noticed is that i read Sans- Serif fonts with much more ease than Seriffed fonts (opposite to what is normal), so i always do my essays in Arial and then change to times new roman before handing in, unfortunately most of the literature comes in Serriffed font and there doesnt appear to be anyway of over riding it in the PDF reader, not that i know of anyway.

AshT
04-27-14, 11:40 AM
I do the same thing, but using adobe reader for windows. It allows you to highlight in different colors and different transparencies. So i will usually change the opacity of my highlighting depending on how important something is (so that the more important it is the more vibrant the color will be), that helps to guide my eyes to the right info when re-reading. And then ill use a separate color all together to highlight things which I am planning on quoting/citing. i also use the little caption tool to write notes in the margin e.g. "this part could be used for the conclusion as it illustrates bla bla bla, or this relates to so and so's notion of such and such".

yeh it looks like i do have a good system going after all i just need to pick up the pace a little and stop fretting i guess.

Just downloading ever note to give it a try too :)

What about doing references. People have mentioned using one note, but i dont see how it could be any quicker than compiling the reference list from scratch anyway. especially if you're using new materials each time anyway.

Evernote is awesome; it's really basic so at first I was like wtf is the point of this?
Then I found a blog post saying the same thing, but then they realised, they were just using it wrong in the first place. It's great for capturing ideas.

For lit reviews. I attached pdfs in a note. Highlighted them all and it reattached them. Then in the note i'd write a bullet pointed summary of stuff from memory =).

For references I can't be much help i'm afraid; I use Latex!

Really interesting about what you're saying with fonts! And with changing the background colors helping! That's what dyslexia color overlays do/are for!

BOOOMERZANGS
05-01-14, 04:42 AM
If my anxiety is bothering me in general (not just at night) then wouldn't it be better if I took something longer acting and less addictive and which has a more consistent effect? like an SSRI...
:thankyou:

I don't know how much help I can be in terms of ADHD specific meds, but in terms of meds for anxiety, I've taken an SSRI (Zoloft; 50 mg) and my experience with it has been a mixed bag. The honeymoon period (starting about 6-8 weeks after I started until about 12-14 weeks after starting) was epic in that I don't think I've ever been that productive for such a long period of time in my life before. The flip side was that once this initial effect wore off and hitting the point in the semester when work was starting to get intense, I found myself reverting back to my old self in terms of being inconsistently productive. I also noticed that I had begun to get much more irritable and stubborn with my friends and family as well as myself in general.

If there's any conclusive thing I can say about antidepressants for anxiety is that it's best to go in with a plan to use the period of time when the drug is at its peak effectiveness to dig right into the issues that are causing your anxiety. This was what I felt the most during this peak period: I had emotional capacity to interpret and evaluate my thoughts without descending into psychobilly freakout mode.

The other option is to consider shaking up your routine, or you know, the general pattern of things that you do (IDK about other people on this forum but I don't think I've ever had or wanted a real routine). Sometimes all it takes for me is an hour of productive time in another place to just kick the dust off the synapses in the 'ole forebrain.

Hopefully this was helpful. I've only recently been diagnosed so I'm still learning all the ins and outs of ADHD. But I've always struggle to sit down and write papers, so I definitely feel where you're coming from. Best of luck to ya bud.:D

neetah
05-02-14, 04:15 AM
yeh my main concern about going on any antidepressant is that it doesn't seem sustainable. I would be concerned that my happiness and peace of mind would come to depend on it. As you said there was a honeymoon period and then it didnt work. As others have mentioned they have to keep upping the dosage or they can get rebound effects trying to wean off them too.