View Full Version : Hoping to put on some muscle and be healthy


JFK4525
04-26-14, 11:43 AM
Hey guys. so i'm on Adderall xr 40mg per day and i'm 6'2" 140 pounds. really not looking to get jacked or anything like that i just want to put on some muscle to improve self confidence and just generally be healthy. i'm quite literally rail thin and you can see a couple of my ribs. i was wondering if anyone would have any advice or dieting strategies since i'm on adderall as well. to be clear i was this exact weight and size before i started the adderall earlier this year.

i have gone to the gym a little bit and done some pull downs, inclined dumbell presses, situps, and curls but going alone can be very discouraging especially when you dont know when the hell you're doing to begin with. i just need some advice so i don't look like some confused kid when i go there. i wanna have a set plan and routine to be able to follow(which my psychologist says is good for adhd people to have). any input would be greatly appreciated :thankyou:

Greyhound1
04-27-14, 12:45 AM
Hey guys. so i'm on Adderall xr 40mg per day and i'm 6'2" 140 pounds. really not looking to get jacked or anything like that i just want to put on some muscle to improve self confidence and just generally be healthy. i'm quite literally rail thin and you can see a couple of my ribs. i was wondering if anyone would have any advice or dieting strategies since i'm on adderall as well. to be clear i was this exact weight and size before i started the adderall earlier this year.

i have gone to the gym a little bit and done some pull downs, inclined dumbell presses, situps, and curls but going alone can be very discouraging especially when you dont know when the hell you're doing to begin with. i just need some advice so i don't look like some confused kid when i go there. i wanna have a set plan and routine to be able to follow(which my psychologist says is good for adhd people to have). any input would be greatly appreciated :thankyou:

You may want to supplement your diet with a good protein shake. They can have a lot of good calories designed for building muscle.

Be careful with your protein source and adderall. Some contain a lot of certain amino acids which counter act your medication. I have found that if I drink a shake within 2 hours of taking my adderall IR, I have bad results.
It works much better for me to drink a shake an hour later.

JFK4525
04-28-14, 11:30 PM
You may want to supplement your diet with a good protein shake. They can have a lot of good calories designed for building muscle.

Be careful with your protein source and adderall. Some contain a lot of certain amino acids which counter act your medication. I have found that if I drink a shake within 2 hours of taking my adderall IR, I have bad results.
It works much better for me to drink a shake an hour later.

every so often i will have a protein shake an hour after i take my meds. i always wait exactly an hour before i eat anything or have a shake. any kinds/brands that you've had good results with? i just use that body fortress whey protein that they sell at walmart. my semester's over a week from wednesday so i'm gonna make it a point to visit the gym 3 times a week every other day. hopefully ill be able to get a solid routine roughed out by then.

the college i'm transferring to in the fall has a beautifully redone like $500,000 fitness center that i'm gonna make it a point to go while i'm dorming there. i know the age of it doesnt matter, weights are heavy no matter how old they are lol. i'm gonna post a picture as a before point to show where i'm starting from and hopefully i'll have some progress to document by september or so

hurricane92
04-30-14, 12:06 AM
we have similar body types- I'm not jacked by any means, but I do have that "functional-fit" look going or so I'm told. I typically do workouts which involve high rep bodyweight exercises and functional weightlifting.

pushups (100 a day will add muscle and get anybody toned, they work)
chin ups/pull-ups (50-60 per day works great for me, my favorite exercise)
kettlebell swings (you can do these with anything heavy, I do sets of 30-40)
overhead/shoulder presses (these help strengthen the shoulders and develop very practical fitness, like all my favorites, however be careful if you're doing alot of pushups in the same workout)

stuff like this works great for me!

Corina86
04-30-14, 12:16 PM
I think you should get a couple of sessions with a trainer. I had one and I learned a lot of things that helped me. I've gained quite a lot of muscle mass in the past years, I don't have a six pack, I just have normal muscles, but I pretty much had none when I began working out.

Among the things I've learned are:
-work only on a certain group of muscles at each gym session (only arms, only legs, only abs), otherwise you're putting too much stress on your heart
-don't work on the same muscle group 2 days in a row; give 1-3 days before doing the exercises for the same muscles
-even for a single muscle group, try to vary the exercises with each session
-don't skip leg-day
-do some cardio only for warm-up, but don't over do it (20 min on the treadmill max)
-avoid long series of exercises- those are good for losing weight; shorter ones with larger weights are better for muscle growth
-eat mostly protein, especially when you get home (muscles don't grow at the gym, but after it, mostly)
-building muscle mass takes time, don't expect any miracles, it will take a couple of months just to see some results. It's really worth it though; being in shape and having more physical strength increases self-esteem by ten fold!

It'sPeter
04-30-14, 05:10 PM
I recently started working out myself. I've had subscriptions to several gyms, but I would always go less and less and eventually become a sponsor with 'ending my subscription' being another thing on the eternal to-do list.

This time I found a gym which has a subscription plan that makes going three times a week free. The catch is that the first three months are forty euros a month and the lesser you go the more expensive it gets with not going costing 40 euros a month.
Because I'm a student with no money, I really am forced to go three times a week, which in the larger scheme of things, is what I really want to do.

I have my ideas about nutrition, but those are quite radical. In short: I'm vegan and believe in a natural fruit-based diet without any added shakes or powders. If you're interested you might check out Durianrider on Youtube. He's quite the character, but I love his energy.

Something that I think most ADD/ADHD'ers could benefit from, is keeping track of your progress. As an ADD'er long-term goals aren't motivating to me. And growing muscles takes some time. Also I need structure.
So when I go to the gym, I always have a small notebook with a pen, and a workout schedule I copied from a book on fitness.

I start with a warm-up on the crosstrainer (10 to 15 minutes). To make it less boring (my ADD, dopamine-junkie mind needs to be entertained) I listen to an audiobook on my phone/MP3 player.

Then I start with the first of the exercises on the schedule and work my way down and strictly follow it. After every single exercise, I write in the notebook which exercise it was, how many reps and sets I did and with which weight. Finally I grade it, just like a school paper. If the exercise was way too easy (the weight wasn't heavy enough) I could give it an eight or seven and a half. If the exercise was too hard and I couldn't even complete the reps and sets I could give it like a four and a half or a five. So, higher grades for when too easy and lower grades for when it's too hard. I try to find the 'six spot'. That's when I can complete the reps and sets, but barely. (I really hope this explanation makes any sense, otherwise let me know!).

The cool thing about this is, that you really feel like you're making progress. Even if it's just by keeping track. And by looking in your notebook, you can see what and how you did last time, so you can continue where you left it. Was that dumbell curl on 20 kgs graded a four? Let's try 10 kgs and grade it again. Was the leg extension graded an eight on 25 kgs last time? Let's try 30 kg's this time.

The fun thing is, that after a few weeks you can riffle through your notebook and see the difference you made. Maybe you're not ripped and bulky, but seeing that you're making functional progress can be just the motivation you need until you're body starts to build.

And finally: for a minute I felt like a complete dork with my notebook and workout schedule. Walking among towering heaps of muscle, trying to find the right machine. But I remembered why I was there. For me and myself alone. Don't care what others might think. I'm not the strongest, the fastest or the biggest dude in my gym, but I'm there for what I set out to do. Some people need a brainstorm session to get great ideas. I have great ideas all the time, but I need a notebook and schedule to be able to work out. So be it.

Good luck and remember that being self-centered is a good thing in the gym :)

DistractedLemur
04-30-14, 08:25 PM
Maybe you could join some sort of sports team or club or class where people are likely to be working out as well, you might find some gym buddys.

EAT! I was watching one video where they were advocating the whole food diet. Whole chickens, whole pizzas, whole tubs of ice cream! :D
You have to actually do the working out though otherwise... you know...

I've read that protein shakes aren't that healthy long term.

I'd give yourself a few weeks of general fitness and bodyweight exercises to condition yourself before moving to heavier weights.

Free weights (dumbbells and barbells etc.) are better for functional fitness and strength than machines because a load of other muscles are brought in to provide balance. Bodyweight exercises are great too.

There is loads of great stuff on YouTube about how exactly to do all sorts of exercises.

If I could keep a routine to save my life I would do something like:
Monday - Arms and back
Tuesday - rest, maybe running or cycling
Wednesday - Chest and core
Thursday - rest, maybe cardio again
Friday - legs
Saturday - rest
Sunday - Running or cycling or whatever cardio

Something like that anyway. Are you supposed to do sit ups every day? Can't remember.

Good luck, it's a great thing to do! The bit after the initial enthusiasm was the hardest for me and I felt like I was getting nowhere but now I've gone back to it it's starting to pay off.

sarahsweets
05-01-14, 05:17 AM
A few things. First dont skimp on eating healthy and especially protein. Lean white meat or fish, legumes and even a quality protein shake. I use Proflex20 by Melaleuca and I have been really happy with it. Dont skimp on the cardio. Its tempting to think that because you are already thin, you shouldnt need cardio. It strengthens the heart, which is a muscle, so its good for everyones workout regimen. Also, I encourage you to consider a trainer. I didnt think I needed one either but I bought a 4-pack of training sessions and just bought 6 more. He structured a plan to work on some specific areas of concern to me along with overall strength training. He has sort of made a circuit training plan for me so when we work out together I get my cardio and weight training at the same time. I only meet with him once a week and handle the myself with his routines the rest of the week. He also measured and weighed me at my request because even though I dont need very much in the way of weight loss, I do like to see the numbers go down and seeing the changes in inches is very encouraging.

Fraser_0762
05-01-14, 06:06 AM
Carbohydrates
Work out
Protein
Rest

You're basically just repeating these 4 steps over and over again. Also ensure that you consume slow burning carbohydrates. Use a protein to body weight calculator to calculate just how much protein you will require. I'd also limit gym usage to around 3 times a week to begin with. When you're just getting into weight training, adequate rest is very important.

hurricane92
05-05-14, 03:57 PM
Very much agree on limiting initial weight workouts. My gradual incorporation of metal into what was once an affair solely between my body and gravity has opened my eyes to very new kinds of soreness.

jcm3900
06-28-14, 06:36 PM
I'm 5 foot 6 and when I started adderall, I dropped from 132 to 124 in 2 weeks.
The day I was weighed the second time, I knew I had to make a change. I started forcing myself to eat 80-100 grams of protein a day (all food no supplements) and working out heavily. And I mean HEAVILY. I've always been skinny, but toned, and fairly strong despite my appearance. I also have been doing lots of upper body exercises off and on since a very early age. Just enough to keep steadily increasing strength with my age(19).

3 weeks ago, I weighed 124. Started doing pullups, pushups, chinups, thigh, calf, and abb building exercises, alternating in that order, six days out of the week. Using sundays to rest. Since adderall made me want to do work around the house, I figured I would just do a set of 10 reps after each and every small task. Usually adding up to 80 to 100 sets of ten of each exercise. Not exaggerating. I was using the boost of energy and mild pain relieving effects of my prescription to do more than some pro body builders. After the first week, my muscles weren't sore from the previous days workout, but I felt stronger and stronger every day. The first time I did 1000 pull ups in 14 hours, I felt like I ran my arms and neck muscles through a meat press and stuffed them back in my skin.

I fought through the routine I would compare to P90X for maniacs, and 3 weeks later, I weigh 133 on an empty stomach. Almost 10 lbs of muscle gained. I look better and I feel wonderful. I've set a goal weight of 160 by the end of the year, just to see if it will look ok. If I start looking like a mini hulk, I'm going to step that back some.

I started building up muscle mass, only to get out of what is considered "underweight for my height". I don't know why my weight is considered unhealthy, but it would feel better to be in a normal weight category with my extremely low body fat percentage. If you want to do the same, try this.

Convert your weight to kg. Multiply it by 1.8. That's how many grams of protein you should consume doing extremely strenuous workouts.
Find your max number of reps in each of the above exercises, and do 60% of that number in a set. Incorporate the sets into daily activities.
If it doesn't hurt like hell, your not doing enough sets.

My number of reps is unique to me. Like I said, I've always had very dense, strong, yet small muscles, causing me to surprise people with my athletic ability. I set the middle school gym class record for number of pull ups in 7th grade with 67 consecutive. The next day I set the record for flex arm hang. The gym teacher made me let go after 7 minutes. Don't expect to be able to do 1000 pull ups a week after reading this. You may seriously damage your muscles if your not experienced.

jcm3900
06-28-14, 06:38 PM
Also..
Get your protein from foods only. Not supplements. Beef, poultry, and dairy are my favorites.