View Full Version : Constantly Feeling On Edge


BellaVita
04-27-14, 07:44 PM
I thought this was ADHD but now starting to consider it may be due to PTSD.

Is feeling constantly on edge/agitated attributed to ADHD, PTSD, or both? (or Bipolar?)

How can one tell the difference?

daveddd
04-27-14, 07:49 PM
hypervigilant?

BellaVita
04-27-14, 07:52 PM
hypervigilant?

Pardon my ignorance but what do you mean?

*Edit* Google is my friend.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervigilance

Yes. I relate 100% to that.

daveddd
04-27-14, 07:56 PM
constantly "on the lookout" for negative emotion provoking situations
like what you mentioned about voices in the ptsd thread

that appears as constantly agitated and on hyper alert

just irritation can be any of the above

daveddd
04-27-14, 08:04 PM
example

I'm hyper vigilant (edgy and on the lookout for others reactions ) in social situations , thats dictated by imbedded shame scenes that have led me to believe that in doomed to be shamed in social situations (complex PTSD leading to social anxiety )

sometimes I'm irritated wherever I'm at, some type of mood problem

BellaVita
04-27-14, 08:10 PM
example

I'm hyper vigilant (edgy and on the lookout for others reactions ) in social situations , thats dictated by imbedded shame scenes that have led me to believe that in doomed to be shamed in social situations (complex PTSD leading to social anxiety )

sometimes I'm irritated wherever I'm at, some type of mood problem

Thanks for sharing.

I am just in constant fear of something, but I don't necessary know what that something is.

It usually has to do with people.

And it doesn't matter where I am, even if alone in my room I'm *always* agitated.

I need to figure out if it's anxiety/PTSD or BP cuz I wanna know what meds will work best.

Although I'm sure I'll have to have a combination of meds.

I know that even the benzos I had been on didn't fully take away this state. And the Lexapro *always* made it worse each time I took it.

daveddd
04-27-14, 08:13 PM
just saw your edit

thats a good definition

daveddd
04-27-14, 08:14 PM
I've heard atypical anti psychotics work well for this

BellaVita
04-27-14, 08:14 PM
just saw your edit

thats a good definition

I'm so used to this state I don't even know what "normal" is.

BellaVita
04-27-14, 08:15 PM
I've heard atypical anti psychotics work well for this

Hmm. Isn't that what Risperdal is?

I tried that and it was horrible.

daveddd
04-27-14, 08:20 PM
abilify may be better

risperdol is known for negative reactions and men growing breasts'

Unmanagable
04-27-14, 08:26 PM
From my personal experiences, yes. Being able to tell the difference is difficult at times. I'm pretty much in a state of heightened alert all the damn time. It's exhausting.

I've learned that my best defense against it, no matter where it's coming from, is to try to remain aware of the internal tensions as soon as they arise and breathe them out as best I can, and let them go their course. Not all scenarios allow for that, though, and I learned it's important to remember to be okay with that, too, and not kick our own a** when we struggle.

In addition to meds, and the one supportive therapist I saw for a while, mindfulness and breathing have been the key things that have helped me figure out how to ride out the emotions vs. having them ride me hard and totally f*** up my day(s).

Learning to allow the feelings to come and actually feel and express them vs. fighting them tooth and nail is one of the hardest things I deal with. Then trying to sort it all out to explain to others/professionals to give them enough to go on to translate it all well enough to actually help, or at least not hurt me any more, is a real pain in the a**. It still trips me up because of the severely unpleasant memories attached to the feelings that arise.

BellaVita
04-27-14, 10:12 PM
From my personal experiences, yes. Being able to tell the difference is difficult at times. I'm pretty much in a state of heightened alert all the damn time. It's exhausting.

I've learned that my best defense against it, no matter where it's coming from, is to try to remain aware of the internal tensions as soon as they arise and breathe them out as best I can, and let them go their course. Not all scenarios allow for that, though, and I learned it's important to remember to be okay with that, too, and not kick our own a** when we struggle.

In addition to meds, and the one supportive therapist I saw for a while, mindfulness and breathing have been the key things that have helped me figure out how to ride out the emotions vs. having them ride me hard and totally f*** up my day(s).

Learning to allow the feelings to come and actually feel and express them vs. fighting them tooth and nail is one of the hardest things I deal with. Then trying to sort it all out to explain to others/professionals to give them enough to go on to translate it all well enough to actually help, or at least not hurt me any more, is a real pain in the a**. It still trips me up because of the severely unpleasant memories attached to the feelings that arise.

Thank you so much for this response.

I do think mindfulness would help me, thanks for the reminder. I really want to get into that.

Glad to hear it's helped you.

Rebelyell
04-27-14, 10:27 PM
Yeah bella I know what your talking about,its that feeling of like being 2 seconds from losing it combined w paranoia that at anytime someone is IDk gonna give us crap or make our life hard or to the point life is soo good and its like one step away from losing it all and losing your grip on the monkey bars of life.I do feel like I have a life force or energy around me that is always trying to stop me when Im doing good.

AdamLL
05-05-14, 02:03 PM
I know what you are talking about to Bella. I have lorazepam for mine. I usually take it at bedtime. I can take it during the day, but I always forget.
Deep breathing helps me, and I know going with is better then fighting it. But sometimes they don't even help. I just keep working at it.

BellaVita
05-12-14, 07:45 PM
Ugh I'm irritable literally ALL the time, I keep snapping too....

I wish I knew how to stop this. :(

silivrentoliel
05-12-14, 07:49 PM
abilify worked REALLY well for me in conjunction w/ my antidepressant... but i couldn't take a second summer w/ the heat sensitivity it gave me (that on top of i've had heat sickness before, so i'm already sensitive to it... it was ridiculous)

BellaVita
05-12-14, 07:54 PM
abilify worked REALLY well for me in conjunction w/ my antidepressant... but i couldn't take a second summer w/ the heat sensitivity it gave me (that on top of i've had heat sickness before, so i'm already sensitive to it... it was ridiculous)

Thanks, I forgot about Abilify.

I'm definitely gonna bring this issue up with my pdoc whenever I get one.

I'm not usually so mean so this is weird for me.

Rebelyell
05-12-14, 10:02 PM
Take away bellas charge card lol jk