View Full Version : No Motivation; worsening performance since accommodations


zeldarocks
04-29-14, 02:34 PM
I've lost motivation, to make things worse, I've begun to coast more and more since being given accommodations.

I'm asking for more extensions, turning in hw late; taking tests late.

Is this normal?

How worried should I be?

dvdnvwls
04-29-14, 04:52 PM
Losing motivation can be for several different reasons.

Don't worry at all; worrying doesn't fix anything. But change something.

When I coast, it's usually because I believe I'll be able to do what I need to do with a lot less time than I have available.

For example, I see that I have double the time necessary, so I say "There's lots of time". So far, apparently, no problem. But look what happens next. :)

I repeat saying "There's lots of time" until the time when I've secretly estimated I'll need to start in order to finish by the deadline has arrived. Now, there is officially not "lots of time". :(

And as soon as "lots of time" isn't available, then I freak out. I think "Oh no! Emergency! Time is almost up!" :eek:

It's as if there's no middle ground, for ADHDers in our "natural state", between "There's lots of time left" and "Emergency! Time is almost up!". We can switch between those ideas in an instant. And once we switch to "emergency", then fear kicks in, and we freeze or run away.

zeldarocks
04-29-14, 05:15 PM
I can very much relate.

For me, it's a matter of: "I'll get to it tomorrow," when tomorrow gets here, I put it off once more.

It's when it gets to deadline-day that I freak out and say "if I only had more time, I'd do it for sure."

As you can imagine, the cycle then repeats itself when/if I get an extension.

I have to FORCE myself to take care of business.

AshT
04-29-14, 05:24 PM
I found things got worse also when some accommodations made. I.e extra time in exams meant I thought "Oh, I have loads of time" and for the first time, I started running out of time during exams!
If you know you can keep moving the deadline, where will the sense of urgency come? Often we need strict deadlines. If you arn't utalising your time with the extentions and it's just extra procrastination time; i'd recommend not allowing them to be moved. If deadlines keep moving it'll have a knock on effect to other work, then we have so many things and can't juggle them. If that makes sense? Best at times to get things done and out the way. We can only do our best, work will never be perfect.

zeldarocks
04-29-14, 06:00 PM
Excellently worded: If I don't have some semblance of structure, I fall apart.

I guess that could very well apply with regards to school.

Stevuke79
04-29-14, 06:45 PM
All my opinions are based on personal anecdote, so I don't know if it's normal, but it makes 100% sense to me. I wouldn't be worried - listen to Dvd, worrying does nothing. It sounds like you need a little structure and you'll be fine. (you'll probably need that your whole life, .. now is as good a time as any to develop the skill.) Do what you have to do, pass, graduate, and this will all be in your rear view mirror soon enough.

One thing that I think is important to realize: school is the only place that's like school. Outside of school itself, being good at school isn't really worth anything. I'm about to do something that I hate when other people do it: blame the system. Usually they're deferring responsibility, but what I'm saying is just to have perspective. In the "real world" people find what they're good at they do it. If you can't do what an employer needs when he needs it, you need to find a different job. The problem is, there's no "different" school. Unlike a career in the real world, it's the same everywhere.

I read an op-ed in the WSJ that made an argument against the accommodation of extended time on the SAT's: would it make sense to give an ADHD air traffic controller extended time to prevent a mid air collision. The argument is idiotic but it underscores the problem. The SAT is not the "Be an air traffic controller exam". It's the "Be anything exam". The reason the SAT tests you're speed reading, short term memory recall and timed basic math is not because that's what you necessarily want to do for a living (some people do, most don't). The reason is that we need a test that is standardized, bite sized,and for 90% of the people reflects accurately on all of their other skills as well. The SAT's are to their credit, are an excellent way to measure all students and get a nice smooth bell curve that for 90% of people is reasonably accurate. That for 10% it is terribly inaccurate isn't a flaw in the SAT's - 90% is pretty good. Anyway, the Op Ed was about the SAT's, but I think that it applies every bit as much to college work. Do what you have to do. Pass. Graduate. I've been a successful professional for many years and I've never taken a timed test since college. Ok, except the series 7,.. a few others,.. but most days, most years actually, .. zero timed tests. :) Also zero speed reading, short term recall, and zero timed basic math. :yes::yes: (I do a lot of complex mathematical reasoning .. but I can take all the time I need... neither my performance on the SAT's nor my performance in college would indicate that I could do that but I can.)

Please forgive my bit of a rant. I hope it was somewhat helpful.

zeldarocks
04-29-14, 08:26 PM
If you don't mind me asking, what is your profession?

I'm about to hit my Sophomore year of undergrad, I'm going for a Psychology degree; planning on going all the way to my Doctorate.

Stevuke79
04-29-14, 08:36 PM
Financial Planner. To my point above, it's highly technical and requires an enormous amount of knowledge, but it requires zero "on the spot" reasoning, speed reading or short term memory.

Stevuke79
04-29-14, 08:44 PM
By the way, I think Psych could be a great choice for someone with ADHD. (Perhaps Mctavish will jump in here) ...

It's not uncommon for ADHD to be accompanied by exceptional sensitivity, intuition and creativity and in my field, as I would imagine would be the case for a psychologist, these traits really help me to read people, communicate effectively and help people work through their challenges. In my case (and again, I don't think I'm uncommon for an ADHD professional) people will truly appreciate your unique perspective and ability to understand and relate to them.

zeldarocks
05-01-14, 03:56 PM
Unfortunately, I have been known to be quite cold and very particular as to who I show affection to. I'm not particularly proud of it; however.

drvenom
05-01-14, 04:12 PM
I second everything that Stevuke79 says. First, get some structure in your academic life. I think this is the most important thing. Second, I believe that motivation comes after action and not the other way around. Get invested into something deeply and you'll become more motivated about that something. Above all, do not procrastinate. If procrastination is an issue, go get some help. And like most people say, do not stress. Whatever you are working on, just try your best as that is all that you can actually do.

And since it was mentioned, I have to say that I hate standardized tests. I'm horrible at them. I'm part of that 10% that Stevuke79 was talking about. I took an IQ test and it was determined that my IQ score is below average. I also did horrible on my GRE exams. The only reason I was accepted into grad school was because the professors at my school were familiar with my work and research and they new that my GRE scores were not good signals of my capacity. I did horrible in the math section of the GRE but one of my degrees is in math; I took part of my coursework at caltech and got A's in all my classes. Anyway, don't worry too much if you're not amazing in school, you can still be amazing out in the field when you graduate.

MarathonEngineer
05-01-14, 07:46 PM
Losing motivation can be for several different reasons.

Don't worry at all; worrying doesn't fix anything. But change something.

When I coast, it's usually because I believe I'll be able to do what I need to do with a lot less time than I have available.

For example, I see that I have double the time necessary, so I say "There's lots of time". So far, apparently, no problem. But look what happens next. :)

I repeat saying "There's lots of time" until the time when I've secretly estimated I'll need to start in order to finish by the deadline has arrived. Now, there is officially not "lots of time". :(

And as soon as "lots of time" isn't available, then I freak out. I think "Oh no! Emergency! Time is almost up!" :eek:

It's as if there's no middle ground, for ADHDers in our "natural state", between "There's lots of time left" and "Emergency! Time is almost up!". We can switch between those ideas in an instant. And once we switch to "emergency", then fear kicks in, and we freeze or run away.

So dang true!!!