View Full Version : opiate withdrawal and easing the symptoms.


Raven Poe
04-30-14, 07:09 PM
So this is my first day of withdrawal from pain pills, particularly hydrocodone. I have been using pills to no end weeks now,taking anywhere from 70 to 100mg over a 24 hour period.
My symptoms began about 12 hours after last dose, last night around 2am with restless legs, insomnia, muscular aches and a feeling of fatigue and dysphoria.
I woke up today with same symptoms including runny nose and severe sweat.
I am supposed to be taking Adderall for my ADHD yet gave up on it months ago after I reached a life threatening low weight, and I never felt that the adderall calmed me yet it did help me focus better. That's when I started up again on my old habit, namely opium addiction and substituted my adderall with pain pills pretty much, I figured adderall is equally if not more harmful so might as well due happy in the end. Opium is the only thing that ever helped me mentally but it is not the acceptable route due to severe addiction and the fast way tolerance builds. So I decided once again to kick the opium having, and here I am on my first day.
What I want to say is, after feeling fatigued to the point if collapsing I went ahead and took adderall. I have never ever gotten addicted to stimulants since the first time I tried them at 16. Within 2 hours my fatigue was gone, I felt more aware and alive but unfortunately I can't stop grinding my teeth and feeling the intense energy, I could clean an entire house right now. So after having taken adderall on my first day of opium withdraw at noon, 6.5 hours later I took Xanax (which I'm supposed to be taking while I take adderall to ease anxiety).
I do not feel the psychological withdrawal from opiates right now but I do feel slight muscle aches and RLS. I am waiting for the benzos to kick in so I may feel more calm due to the high energy from adderall and stop grinding my teeth.
In regard to physical withdrawal from opiates I am taking:
Cyclobenzaprine-muscle relaxer, I take it in the morning after breakfast and then at night before bed, to aid in muscle pain.
Tylenol-muscular pain reliever, I take it once a day with dinner.
Gabapentin-aids in restless legs, I take this in the morning and before bedtime to ease restless leg syndrome as it the most intolerable symptom for me.
In regard to psych meds for psych withdrawal from opium, i am taking:
Xanax- as a part of my adderall use under the supervision of an md, which luckily the benzos help TREMENDOUSLY with opiate withdraw, by reliving anxiety and restless legs syndrome as well.
Adderall XR-Duh, I already mentioned it. But it has masked the opium psychological withdraw to an amazing degree, which means the most to me right now.
Clonazepam-secondary benzodiazepine, even though IT IS NOT wise to combine denzos and I am only going to do it fir the first 4-5 days of my withdrawal. I only will be taking a low dose of clonazepam in the morning at 8am to ease with early day anxiety along with RLS, sane time I take adderall, while taking Xanax around 6pm fir the adderall come down and it's usefulness in helping opiate withdrawal.
Lastly, I take a melatonin or ambien around 11pm to help me sleep due to the damn adderall, but it also helps with the opiate withdrawal insomnia.

All in all, make sure your meds do not interact and if they do, depending on how often you take them, try to take the ones that interact 8-12 hours later.

I am only going to follow this plan from 4/30 until 5/5 of 2014. Once the 6th of May comes, I will be taking non of the above meds except Xanax for my anxiety disorder and RLS.


I open open to any feedback and/or criticism as to my ideas regarding the topic of opiate withdrawal, specifically easying the symptoms.


I stopped adderall months ago due the loss of 20 pounds leaving me at 97 pounds, the unpleasant feeling of being on cocaine, the fact that adderall made me smoke tons of marijuana, as well as taking higher doses of Xanax.

I began opiates cause i didn't have to take ANY OTHER MEDICATION, whether it was Xanax, weed, lorazepam, ambien.

So in adderall I was taking also Xanax to ease anxiety and the come down in the evening, clonazepam small dose in morning every other day to ease anxiety further, Marijuana all day, ond ambient to sleep

In painkillers I took nothing else.. pain pills relieved anxiety, RLS, and perhaps every now and then a very small dose of Xanax (3 Times a week), along with a but of pot before I went to bed.

droppa
04-30-14, 07:36 PM
First of all, I wish you the best with your withdrawal. It's always tough to do it on your own. I struggled with heroin addiction for roughly 10-12 years and kicked several times. As much as I hate a lot of the "recovery" rhetoric, one thing they say is very true -- kicking is the easy part, staying clean is the tough part.

One thing I wanted to mention is that, well, I'm essentially a pretty steadfast idealist and I have always viewed drugs as the chemicals they are that influence or manipulate chemicals in my body, henceforth withdrawal was simply part of the process. It always irritated me when people would talk about drugs as this "evil" thing, when the drugs are neither good nor evil, they are just things.

But with my idealism, even though I respected the chemistry, I always felt like I would be able to escape the negative aspects by accommodating in one way or another. Unfortunately, this mindset ended up blurring the lines of morality in some other parts of my life during some of my deepest points in the abyss.

My point is that, yes, you can take this or that medication to counteract this or that symptom, but there's no medication to make things better with your family and friends, or get your job back, or get you out of jail.

I was one of the smartest, so I thought, with my 174 IQ and seeming invincibility. I managed to stay out of trouble for YEARS because I was very resourceful and knew how to make omelets without breaking too many eggs. But, it was like, at some point I looked back and I had eaten a **** ton of omelets and had a massive trail of egg shells behind me. And beyond that, all of my, well, I might as well keep with the analogy, all of my breakfast chefery caught up with me. Just last year I had to spent 4 months in jail for a situation 3 years prior, and I seriously made out. I should have gotten like a bunch of years for the massive chase i took police on and for all of the drugs i had on me, but I got 18 months probation. And I thought it was funny when I got a warrant for violating it. And then I thought I was smart when the feds raided my apartment two days after I moved out. And I kept thinking that I was getting away with stuff because I never had to pay the piper. But all of the while, horrible stuff was happening.

You may never experience these problems and you may feel like you were smarter than the average bear. But I assure you, as certain as the sun will rise tomorrow, opiates will eventually get hold and tear your life apart, so for the love of dog, be careful homey! Sometimes it's not a bad idea to feel a little pain when you're withdrawling so you associate it with a bad thing, not just a thing.

sebastianprada
04-30-14, 07:50 PM
You should talk to a doctor about the feasibility and safety of using benzodiazepines, and imidazopyridines to withdraw from opiates. I personally think you are taking a wrong approach, and you are risking secondary and far-more damaging addictions. If I was you I would stick to painkillers and xanax, and slowly lower the intake of the former one, if that's your plan. Seeing a substance-abuse psychologist for 16-weeks will help you immensely. Best desires.

Raven Poe
05-01-14, 01:28 AM
Droppa-thanks for the advice, and for reading this-same to you Sebastian!
Droppa, I too was a heroin addict only for 2 years, 16-18 years old, (yeah dint ask were my parents were, father divorced living on the other side of the earth with his new family, wheread I grew up with mommy who worked 12 hours a day to support us, and other than than she was in bed getting rested. Both my parents have had a rough childhood, so have I, which is the only reason why I have understanding towards my parents lack of attention or affection. As psychologist Maslow, a humanistic/optimistic philosopher, has stated over and over, a human must first fulfil his own soul and then he us ready to face the world .Anyhow, I don't even know how I git into this :)
In regard to "getting off is easy, staying clean is hard", so true. That's is where we prove ourselves who really is in control within us .

Sebastian:Benzos I am supposed daily as with adderall
The only new thing in my body is the lacking opiates along with medium muscular pains for which I take muscle relaxes.

Raven Poe
05-01-14, 02:18 AM
You should talk to a doctor about the feasibility and safety of using benzodiazepines, and imidazopyridines to withdraw from opiates. I personally think you are taking a wrong approach, and you are risking secondary and far-more damaging addictions. If I was you I would stick to painkillers and xanax, and slowly lower the intake of the former one, if that's your plan. Seeing a substance-abuse psychologist for 16-weeks will help you immensely. Best desires.

I highly doubt I will get addicted to anything new, in the past 14years I have tried every kind. I have NEVER ever been addicted to anything but cigs, opiates, Xanax,weed, and I drink alcohol no more than 3-4 Times a year, meanings I'm not addicted to alcohol either.
Personally, the only ones of those substances I think really help me were psychologically and during times if high stress due to work, school, parents, or life' problems
So my predicament is between the option of pain pills, which help me focus tremendously when studying (adderall ruins this most desired part of this Med, namely because of the physical energy it gives, which is exactly why I spend 2 grand a year with psych's
As far as getting high off stimulants, not the anxiety-worry Freak

Tyboulder
06-04-14, 01:23 PM
Many people have used kratom to ease the effects. I use it to concentrate. It's legal in most states and might do some good, though I don't know if it'd be enough considering the doses you were on.

Old School MBD
08-29-14, 03:50 AM
I use this for alcohol dependence, but it also works for opioids: Naltrexone

Here is the wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naltrexone

Ask your DR if it right for you

Laserbeak
09-20-14, 10:34 AM
It sounds like you have almost everything you could have. The only things I would say is to not take Tylenol, take an NSAID. Tylenol can be very toxic to your liver.

Also, if you have problems with diarrhea, a common opiate withdrawal symptom, take the OTC Immodium or a generic containing Loperamide HCl. That actually is an opioid, but it doesn't go into the brain (for long at least, there's a little bit of debate over that left), so it does not make you high or requires a prescription; however, it works the same way on the gut as other opioids do, therefore you can take them and then taper off without getting any mental effects.

HTH

Laserbeak
09-20-14, 10:46 AM
I use this for alcohol dependence, but it also works for opioids: Naltrexone

Here is the wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naltrexone

Ask your DR if it right for you

Naltrexone blockades opioids from attaching to receptor sites in the brain, causing them to immediately stop working. It is most useful for someone who has taken an overdose, it can bring someone on the brink of death to being wide awake and fine.

It is also used to keep people from taking them since they know they won't work, sort of like Antabuse which makes you violently ill if you drink just a bit of alcohol.

It also is used off-label as an aid for people to stop drinking, however it can't be used by anyone who takes opioid painkillers legitimately.

Laserbeak
09-22-14, 03:05 AM
Let me add though that Naltrexone can actually make withdrawal symptoms worse, since if you start taking it all the opioids in your body immediately stop working, precipitating immediate withdrawal symptoms, though it may shorten the iength. So it certainly isn't a panacea for opioid withdrawal symptoms.

miss_beckyloca
09-22-14, 03:43 AM
Hi,
I also take prescription pain medication (numerous back problems), muscle relaxers, Klonopin and now Vyvanse (ADHD)...

I do not advise taking Klonopin AND Xanax...

However, having been on pain meds since 2010, I've had my share of WD's at times... If possible, taper--take the absolute minimum u can... This eases it. But usually WD is over in about 48hrs--at least the worst of it... Good luck hun!

sarahsweets
09-22-14, 05:58 AM
Been fortunate never to have experienced w/d from opiates but have been on and steady low daily dose for a year and never really had an issue when I've filled my script late. Maybe because my dose is so low that makes a difference.

miss_beckyloca
09-22-14, 08:42 AM
Hi again,

I should have also said in me previous post if you are taking opiate meds for pain, to ward off WD--by Tapering--u will never be completely FREE of symptoms, by taking the bare minimum, u are just trying to take enough to stay outta WD as best you can, but u will most likely stay in pain to an extent & other symptoms until you can get a script filled etc...

The way I Taper is like if u generally take 90-120mg per day... U start taking say 60-90mg, then less and less, I cut mine into halves & quarters... Just trying to by time until you can refill your script... Again, bare minimum to get by... Generally if I can taper down to 10/7.5mg per day, it's not terrible coming off completely--aside from the blinding stabbing feeling in my upper middle back & lower left side spreading to my legs...... But hey, beats throwing up etc...
And this sucks! But, it's better than all out cold turkey...

Laserbeak
09-23-14, 10:26 PM
Been fortunate never to have experienced w/d from opiates but have been on and steady low daily dose for a year and never really had an issue when I've filled my script late. Maybe because my dose is so low that makes a difference.

The only major effect I had was diarrhea (yeah I know TMI), but the Immodium stops that. I wish I had known about it a long time ago.

Laserbeak
09-23-14, 10:32 PM
Also oxycodone seems to have less withdrawal symptoms at least in some people than the others. It is believed to be at least partially a k-opioid agonist rather than a -opioid agonist like all the rest.