View Full Version : Is Mononucleosis Causing ADD/ADHD?


Candyman
05-03-14, 07:45 PM
When did your ADD/ADHD symptoms begin?

Mine seemed to begin when I was a teenager. I developed a severe Mono infection that progressed into liver inflammation. This debilitating illness was the sickest that I have ever been in my life. I had extreme fatigue, and was delirious. The doctor told me that there was nothing that he could do for me, and sent me home. He said that there were no medications to treat this. I asked him how long it would be before I could make a full recovery, and he said probably never. Over 20 years later, I still feel sluggish and tired.

This is where my concentration problems began...But that was only one of the long term symptoms that I developed. I also developed chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, anxiety, and many other "non specific" symptoms that doctors can't or won't treat. The only treatment is the standard antidepressants/amphetamines which doesn't treat the cause...Only the symptoms. And these drugs only have little, if any effect on me.

TheatreKid
05-03-14, 08:11 PM
I had inattentive and hyperactive issues as a child. In grade 3 I started skipping math by asking to go to the bathroom. I would hide out in the bathroom pretending to put my arm in a cast with wet paper towel. Eventually the teacher called my parents and I got in huge trouble. Shortly after that they sent me for IQ testing and put me in gifted classes, but I never felt like I belonged. I was a smart kid, but had this whole host of other problems that didn't get noticed because I was "bright". I barely squeaked into those classes, as far as test scores go, and I floundered. I might have done better self esteem wise to stay with the normal kids and get extra support.

Every report card I took home had the comment "TheatreKid cannot stay on task".

I made it through grade school and high school, though I almost failed Math and didn't take it past grade 11. This coming from the kid who even in grade 9 was writing the Gauss Math Competition every year.

When puberty hit, I developed symptoms of bipolar disorder, and in my early 20's had my first manic break, and my concentration, focus and motivation has been pretty much the pits since then.

EDITED TO ADD: I definitely think I had ADHD as a child. The bipolar definitely didn't cause the symptoms, but it did make them worse.

TheatreKid
05-03-14, 08:33 PM
You weren't suggesting that ALL ADHD is caused by mono, right? You're just wondering if mono initiated or made yours worse?

daveddd
05-03-14, 08:47 PM
No. Mono does not cause ADD. I understand your frustration, perhaps even despair at long term symptoms. My commiserations.

However, your post's subject header is utterly irresponsible, given the wealth of information on this website, on the CHADD website etc.

Please consider deleting your original post, or editing the subject line.

Please do yourself a favour: do some research on this forum, or on the CHADD site. Then if you have some constructive questions, we can work with those.

Sorry to sound irritated, but truly, your headline "question" smacks of newspaper stories designed to mislead the uninformed masses!

All the best
R

I don't get the anger

What do you think causes ADHD

There are illnesses and mono genetic conditions that cause ADHD. An infection making it into the brain isn't far fetched

Lunacie
05-03-14, 11:33 PM
I don't believe mononucleosis causes ADHD. If you didn't show any sign of having ADHD
before you caught mono, then you probably don't have ADHD.

There is a real possibility that mono causes Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia.
Both of those have some similar symptoms to ADHD.

I don't know if there is a medication for treating CFS. I do know Lyrica has been helpful in treating Fibromyalgia.

Candyman
05-04-14, 12:35 AM
I don't believe mononucleosis causes ADHD. If you didn't show any sign of having ADHD
before you caught mono, then you probably don't have ADHD.

There is a real possibility that mono causes Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia.
Both of those have some similar symptoms to ADHD.

I don't know if there is a medication for treating CFS. I do know Lyrica has been helpful in treating Fibromyalgia.

Again, this seems to be more textbook nonsense. I'm sure I had ADHD (even though this condition hadn't been invented yet) back then. Most kids have this condition. That tells me that this is the way that nature hardwired our brains. The only thing that has changed is our society. We didn't evolve to be sitting inside a classroom all day studying history and math. This wouldn't help us in our survival.

ADD is just another "non specific" symptom of mono. No blood tests can prove that these symptoms exist, just like no blood tests can prove that ADHD/ADD exists! Again, the only difference is what the textbook says....And the world can't deviate from what is written on paper.:lol:

namazu
05-04-14, 01:23 AM
Candyman, there is growing evidence that chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms can sometimes result from infections (or the body's response to those infections). There is growing interest in a hypothesized autoimmune response to strep infections that could result in sudden-onset OCD and tics, for example. Epstein-Barr virus (the cause of mono) is being investigated for possible connections to multiple sclerosis and subclinical psychotic symptoms, as well as chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia, as Lunacie mentioned.

It is certainly plausible that your concentration issues could be related to your severe case of mono as a teen, especially if the symptoms began shortly thereafter, and weren't present to any significant extent before you had mono.

I'm a bit confused when you say that "Most kids have this condition [ADHD]" and you had ADHD "back then" (before you had mono?) because your brain (like that of most kids) was "hard-wired" that way. I'm not sure what you meant to say by this -- your problem was caused by mono, but you had ADHD before you had mono)? (Along with most kids who were done a disservice by societal changes and educational design?) :scratch:

You are aware that among the criteria for diagnosis

BellaVita
05-04-14, 01:25 AM
Again, this seems to be more textbook nonsense. I'm sure I had ADHD (even though this condition hadn't been invented yet) back then. Most kids have this condition. That tells me that this is the way that nature hardwired our brains. The only thing that has changed is our society. We didn't evolve to be sitting inside a classroom all day studying history and math. This wouldn't help us in our survival.

ADD is just another "non specific" symptom of mono. No blood tests can prove that these symptoms exist, just like no blood tests can prove that ADHD/ADD exists! Again, the only difference is what the textbook says....And the world can't deviate from what is written on paper.:lol:

Actually, the WBC count for mono is usually high....that's often how it's diagnosed.

And it's "textbook nonsense" for a reason - because that is what is currently scientifically up-to-date.

It took A LOT for it to "get on that paper."

ADHD isn't a symptom of mono, non-specific or not. At least, not proven anyway.

I doubt every person with ADHD has had mono before.

Candyman
05-04-14, 01:48 AM
Candyman, there is growing evidence that chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms can sometimes result from infections (or the body's response to those infections). There is growing interest in a hypothesized autoimmune response to strep infections that could result in sudden-onset OCD and tics, for example. Epstein-Barr virus (the cause of mono) is being investigated for possible connections to multiple sclerosis and subclinical psychotic symptoms, as well as chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia, as Lunacie mentioned.

It is certainly plausible that your concentration issues could be related to your severe case of mono as a teen, especially if the symptoms began shortly thereafter, and weren't present to any significant extent before you had mono.

I'm a bit confused when you say that "Most kids have this condition [ADHD]" and you had ADHD "back then" (before you had mono?) because your brain (like that of most kids) was "hard-wired" that way. I'm not sure what you meant to say by this -- your problem was caused by mono, but you had ADHD before you had mono)? (Along with most kids who were done a disservice by societal changes and educational design?) :scratch:

You are aware that among the criteria for diagnosis

When I was a child I probably had ADHD (even though it hadn't been invented yet). After the infection, I had ADD (without the "H") with chronic fatigue, depression, and many other symptoms. I also had liver inflammation (non viral hepatitis), which was probably worse than the mono. In the real world, doctors don't seem to know what causes this long term condition, or how to treat it. They just send you home and tell you to get plenty of bed rest. Then they give you antidepressants.

And I meant exactly what I said, when I said that most kids have ADHD and are hardwired this way. Maybe you should do some research on how evolution works.

Candyman
05-04-14, 01:58 AM
Actually, the WBC count for mono is usually high....that's often how it's diagnosed.

And it's "textbook nonsense" for a reason - because that is what is currently scientifically up-to-date.

It took A LOT for it to "get on that paper."

ADHD isn't a symptom of mono, non-specific or not. At least, not proven anyway.

I doubt every person with ADHD has had mono before.

First of all, 90% of the population has had mono. The only difference is the severity of the illness. Maybe you should talk to a doctor before posting. Again, if you ever suffer from a severe form of this condition, you will suffer from the worst delirium and confusion that you have ever experienced, and it will persist, and affect your ability to concentrate. If you haven't experienced it, then you aren't qualified to comment or judge. Read my comment above...The world has never followed a textbook.

namazu
05-04-14, 01:58 AM
When I was a child I probably had ADHD (even though it hadn't been invented yet). After the infection, I had ADD (without the "H") with chronic fatigue, depression, and many other symptoms. I also had liver inflammation (non viral hepatitis), which was probably worse than the mono. In the real world, doctors don't seem to know what causes this long term condition, or how to treat it. They just send you home and tell you to get plenty of bed rest. Then they give you antidepressants.

And I meant exactly what I said, when I said that most kids have ADHD and are hardwired this way. Maybe you should do some research on how evolution works.

My post got truncated in some weird way, so a lot of my points and some of the nuance were lost.

My main point was this: you can't simultaneously claim that you (like most kids) had ADHD already as a child, and that mono in your teens caused your ADD.

Sure, I'll buy that mono led to your fatigue, depression, etc., and grant that those would complicate your pre-existing ADHD -- but the mono couldn't have caused the ADHD if you had the ADHD before the mono.

Are you suggesting that the nature of your ADHD changed as you passed through your teen years, with fewer hyperactive symptoms and more problems with the inattentive symptoms? This is common, and related to maturation of the brain, regardless of whether someone contracts mono or not.

Furthermore, for a valid diagnosis of childhood ADHD, symptoms have to be more frequent/severe/developmentally inappropriate than in most children, so by definition, "most children" couldn't have ADHD. Some of the symptoms some of the time, sure, but not ADHD -- in which those developmentally-inappropriate symptoms are impairing in multiple settings (not just school). It's true that most people get EBV at some point in their lives, though most do not have and never develop ADHD. In more severe cases of EBV, neurological symptoms are more likely, but saying that EBV can cause neurological symptoms is different from saying that mono causes ADHD, especially when the ADHD preceded the mono.

Also, ADD +/- H or ADHD as a label has been in use since 1980 -- probably by the time you were a kid in school. But that doesn't mean that ADHD was "invented" then; the syndrome has been documented for over a century, and was diagnosed and treated under other names previously. It is not an invention of modern society, though I would agree with you that some structures of modern society could exacerbate the effects of ADHD.

I am well aware of how evolution works, but I don't see its relevance to the claim that mononucleosis could be responsible for ADHD-like symptoms.

In any case, I agree with you that the way poorly-understood symptoms are handled by the medical establishment is often problematic, especially when practitioners dismiss your complaints or don't work with you. To some extent, we need the evidence to catch up so that we can figure out what treatments may be more effective for these conditions that don't respond well to current medications -- whether those treatments are different / new medications or non-medication forms of therapy or environment/lifestyle changes. I'm sorry you've had a tough time getting your symptoms under control and wish you the best for the future.

BellaVita
05-04-14, 01:59 AM
When I was a child I probably had ADHD (even though it hadn't been invented yet). After the infection, I had ADD (without the "H") with chronic fatigue, depression, and many other symptoms. I also had liver inflammation (non viral hepatitis), which was probably worse than the mono. In the real world, doctors don't seem to know what causes this long term condition, or how to treat it. They just send you home and tell you to get plenty of bed rest. Then they give you antidepressants.

And I meant exactly what I said, when I said that most kids have ADHD and are hardwired this way. Maybe you should do some research on how evolution works.

Can you cite your sources that say most kids have ADHD?

(Scientific sources, please)

sarahsweets
05-04-14, 05:48 AM
And I meant exactly what I said, when I said that most kids have ADHD and are hardwired this way. Maybe you should do some research on how evolution works.

Most kids do NOT have ADHD and are NOT hardwired this way. Correlation does not equal causation.

Fortune
05-04-14, 07:40 AM
Again, this seems to be more textbook nonsense. I'm sure I had ADHD (even though this condition hadn't been invented yet) back then. Most kids have this condition. That tells me that this is the way that nature hardwired our brains. The only thing that has changed is our society. We didn't evolve to be sitting inside a classroom all day studying history and math. This wouldn't help us in our survival.

The condition was never invented. I think the earliest identification of ADHD as a syndrome was in 1798 by Sir Alexander Crichton (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3000907/).

It is also not the way most kids are. If it were, it wouldn't be identifiable as a cluster of symptoms, because it would be within the range of "typical."

As far as evolution, that's nonsense. We didn't evolve to do a lot of things, but we do them anyway. School environments can exacerbate ADHD but they don't create it.

ADD is just another "non specific" symptom of mono. No blood tests can prove that these symptoms exist, just like no blood tests can prove that ADHD/ADD exists! Again, the only difference is what the textbook says....And the world can't deviate from what is written on paper.:lol:

Do you know what else doesn't have blood tests? Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism, any personality disorder, migraines, bipolar, and any other mental illness or neurodevelopmental disorder. Pointing out that there's no blood test is not a decisive argument. It's just a matter of stating the obvious.

In order to be diagnosed with ADHD, you have to develop the symptoms before a certain age. If you get mono and develop the symptoms during/after having mono and you are past that age, you don't have ADHD, by definition. If you do before, you probably still don't have ADHD, although you may have similar symptoms.

I know someone who developed rather severe issues after mono - possibly CFS/ME (although she's never been diagnosed as such). She doesn't have ADHD.

For that matter, my symptoms predate mono by 7-8 years.

Candyman
05-04-14, 09:53 AM
My post got truncated in some weird way, so a lot of my points and some of the nuance were lost.

My main point was this: you can't simultaneously claim that you (like most kids) had ADHD already as a child, and that mono in your teens caused your ADD.

Sure, I'll buy that mono led to your fatigue, depression, etc., and grant that those would complicate your pre-existing ADHD -- but the mono couldn't have caused the ADHD if you had the ADHD before the mono.

Are you suggesting that the nature of your ADHD changed as you passed through your teen years, with fewer hyperactive symptoms and more problems with the inattentive symptoms? This is common, and related to maturation of the brain, regardless of whether someone contracts mono or not.

Furthermore, for a valid diagnosis of childhood ADHD, symptoms have to be more frequent/severe/developmentally inappropriate than in most children, so by definition, "most children" couldn't have ADHD. Some of the symptoms some of the time, sure, but not ADHD -- in which those developmentally-inappropriate symptoms are impairing in multiple settings (not just school). It's true that most people get EBV at some point in their lives, though most do not have and never develop ADHD. In more severe cases of EBV, neurological symptoms are more likely, but saying that EBV can cause neurological symptoms is different from saying that mono causes ADHD, especially when the ADHD preceded the mono.

Also, ADD +/- H or ADHD as a label has been in use since 1980 -- probably by the time you were a kid in school. But that doesn't mean that ADHD was "invented" then; the syndrome has been documented for over a century, and was diagnosed and treated under other names previously. It is not an invention of modern society, though I would agree with you that some structures of modern society could exacerbate the effects of ADHD.

I am well aware of how evolution works, but I don't see its relevance to the claim that mononucleosis could be responsible for ADHD-like symptoms.

In any case, I agree with you that the way poorly-understood symptoms are handled by the medical establishment is often problematic, especially when practitioners dismiss your complaints or don't work with you. To some extent, we need the evidence to catch up so that we can figure out what treatments may be more effective for these conditions that don't respond well to current medications -- whether those treatments are different / new medications or non-medication forms of therapy or environment/lifestyle changes. I'm sorry you've had a tough time getting your symptoms under control and wish you the best for the future.

I probably didn't have true ADHD before the mono, the diagnosis didn't exist back then. Even though I did poorly in school, I felt like a normal kid. The fact is that most of this stuff is speculation....Even by the doctors. After the mono, I began having symptoms of brain fog and concentration problems. Then the chronic fatigue. These are all non specific symptoms of other conditions, besides just the typical ADD/ADHD classification.

Mono is caused by the Epstein Bar Virus. This will often cause chronic Epstein Bar Virus syndrome, because the virus stays inside your body for life, and you continue to stay ill, to a much milder extent, according to my doctor. Depression, chronic fatigue, brain fog, are all symptoms. Although doctors don't have much info on this, or even seem to care, and I can't seem to find much research on it, that is easy to understand. And there is no drugs to treat it. They will usually change the subject quickly, and then offer me an antidepressant. The only thing doctors told me was that I would probably be like this for the rest of my life. Again, 90% of the adult population has this virus inside them. Yet for some strange reason, it had a far worse effect on me, and especially my liver.

You say that ADHD has existed since 1980, yet that doesn't mean that doctors knew what this was, or even treated it. Many may have even called it a quack diagnosis (I don't believe this myself). My oldest brother had "hyperactivity" (the term ADHD wasn't used) back then according to the doctor, and my parents were told that this was caused by diet and food additives. They were told to keep him off the sugar, and it would help.

Lunacie
05-04-14, 10:11 AM
I probably didn't have true ADHD before the mono, the diagnosis didn't exist back then. Even though I did poorly in school, I felt like a normal kid. The fact is that most of this stuff is speculation....Even by the doctors. After the mono, I began having symptoms of brain fog and concentration problems. Then the chronic fatigue. These are all non specific symptoms of other conditions, besides just the typical ADD/ADHD classification.

Mono is caused by the Epstein Bar Virus. This will often cause chronic Epstein Bar Virus syndrome, because the virus stays inside your body for life, and you continue to stay ill, to a much milder extent, according to my doctor. Depression, chronic fatigue, brain fog, are all symptoms. Although doctors don't have much info on this, or even seem to care, and I can't seem to find much research on it, that is easy to understand. And there is no drugs to treat it. They will usually change the subject quickly, and then offer me an antidepressant. The only thing doctors told me was that I would probably be like this for the rest of my life. Again, 90% of the adult population has this virus inside them. Yet for some strange reason, it had a far worse effect on me, and especially my liver.

You say that ADHD has existed since 1980, yet that doesn't mean that doctors knew what this was, or even treated it. Many may have even called it a quack diagnosis (I don't believe this myself). My oldest brother had "hyperactivity" (the term ADHD wasn't used) back then according to the doctor, and my parents were told that this was caused by diet and food additives. They were told to keep him off the sugar, and it would help.

The symptoms of what we now call ADHD were described by writers and physicians as far back as 1775.
The terminology used to describe the symptoms has gone through many changes over history, including
"minimal brain damage", "minimal brain dysfunction", "learning/behavioral disabilities" and "hyperactivity".

So the diagnosis did exist "back then," the label changed, not the diagnosis.

It was in 1980 that the DSM began calling it ADD, with or without hyperactivity.
Just another new name, and not the last we'll see, for the same old problem.
Dr. Barkley suggests the name Attention Regulation Disorder is more appropros.

Research in the last few decades has shown there is no link between ADHD and diet or food additives.
Although sugar may make any child hyperactive, it doesn't cause ADHD symptoms.

Having a sibling who has ADHD increases the odds that you have ADHD yourself, but it's still only about 25%.

Epidemics such as encephalitis have also led to concerns that a virus or illness may cause "minimal brain damage" or symptoms like ADHD.

Fortune
05-04-14, 10:39 AM
Yep, there are - or at least were - people on this forum diagnosed in the 1960s. My sister was diagnosed in the 1970s. Implementing a label does not mean that the condition wasn't known previously.

Amtram
05-04-14, 12:49 PM
I was diagnosed in 1965, my brother in 1970. Several family members clearly displayed symptoms and were impaired by the disorder without being diagnosed, back into the 1800s. I can say with a good amount of certainty that my ADHD and my brother's and my uncle's and my grandmother's go back along the maternal line for many generations. And I never had mono, either - definitely didn't have it when I was five years old.

MADD As A Hatte
05-05-14, 03:38 AM
I don't get the anger

Apologies to all. My rather agitated post has quite rightfully been withdrawn. Don't quite know what triggered my angry reaction, I need to think it through. Meantime, I'll sit this one out.

Again, apologies for any offence I may have caused.

Cheers

Fortune
05-05-14, 04:34 AM
I do think if you have ADHD, catching mono and having it linger definitely makes it worse.

Amtram
05-05-14, 11:22 AM
I'd say having ADHD would definitely make a drawn-out case of mono much worse. Perhaps the other way around, if you had to get out of bed and function.

Fortune
05-05-14, 11:37 AM
I meant when people have mono and then stuff sticks around for like years afterward, with no cure. It was mentioned upthread but I forget what it's called.

Having mono on it's own sucked. I was sick for nearly a month. The nausea started while I was in my 7th grade class watching a documentary about the Bushmen of the Kalihari. I have a strong stomach and gore basically never bothers me, but watching them carve up giraffes made me extremely nauseous. Turned out it wasn't the gore, it was the mono.

Gorram mono.

Candyman
05-05-14, 06:36 PM
Another symptom of mono is "malaise." This is a feeling that comes over you when you are seriously ill. It is a feeling of sadness, major depression, and general feeling of not being well. Nature probably put this feeling in us to let our brain know that something is seriously wrong with our body. This feeling of malaise never went away after the acute phase of illness, and became a permanent part of my life. It eventually got diagnosed as major depressive disorder, and the doctors and therapists insisted that this condition was caused by "life's little disappointments" that are hidden in the subconscious brain, and not any illness, because that's what the textbook says. Although, after suffering with malaise for a few years, life will begin having major disappointments, because you won't be able to function well at work, or socially. Disappointments DID NOT cause the malaise....The malaise causes the disappointments.

Candyman
05-05-14, 08:43 PM
I've mentioned "nature" and "evolution" a few times in this thread, because I believe that nature has hardwired our bodies and brains a certain way for a reason...And the reason is for our survival. In the above post I talked about how nature probably put this feeling (malaise) in us to let our brain know that something is seriously wrong with our body. I truly believe this, because at this young age, as terribly sick as I was, I would not have gone to the doctor because I was afraid of doctors and needles. I put-off going to the doctor until the malaise symptom started, which made me feel like something was terribly wrong, and I was dying from this illness. I then quickly set-up an appointment, because of the feeling that I wasn't going to live much longer. Although now, I wish this symptom would turn off.

Fortune
05-05-14, 10:37 PM
Nature doesn't really do anything. Nature describes an abstract concept.

Evolution doesn't have a directed purpose. It doesn't act, and neither does nature. Nature didn't hardwire our bodies or brains. Our bodies (and brains) are the result of a continuing process in which species either adapt (through natural selection and evolution) to their environmnents or they die out because they can't adapt quickly enough.

Essentially, evolution (and nature) have no telos.

Amtram
05-06-14, 11:54 AM
But, Fortune, evolution is hard! Neutral Theory: The Null Hypothesis of Molecular Evolution (http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/neutral-theory-the-null-hypothesis-of-molecular-839)

Candyman
05-06-14, 01:17 PM
Nature doesn't really do anything. Nature describes an abstract concept.

Evolution doesn't have a directed purpose. It doesn't act, and neither does nature. Nature didn't hardwire our bodies or brains. Our bodies (and brains) are the result of a continuing process in which species either adapt (through natural selection and evolution) to their environmnents or they die out because they can't adapt quickly enough.

Essentially, evolution (and nature) have no telos.

Well, I understand this....But I didn't feel the need to go into this much detail. I was actualy expecting to hear the religious argument.

Lunacie
05-06-14, 01:55 PM
Well, I understand this....But I didn't feel the need to go into this much detail. I was actualy expecting to hear the religious argument.

;) Not on this forum. Read the FAQ ... no politics and no religion.

Fortune
05-06-14, 03:31 PM
Well, I understand this....But I didn't feel the need to go into this much detail. I was actualy expecting to hear the religious argument.

I do agree with you that school environments are pretty much terrible for children, though. Especially these days with all the emphasis on tests over study.

Candyman
05-06-14, 09:45 PM
Nature doesn't really do anything. Nature describes an abstract concept.

Evolution doesn't have a directed purpose. It doesn't act, and neither does nature. Nature didn't hardwire our bodies or brains. Our bodies (and brains) are the result of a continuing process in which species either adapt (through natural selection and evolution) to their environmnents or they die out because they can't adapt quickly enough.

Essentially, evolution (and nature) have no telos.

Philosophy is an interesting subject because its answers a lot of questions. I never went to college, but I consider myself self educated. I usually don't pick apart issues this deeply anymore, because after I finish picking them apart, I usually don't like the answer that I find at the bottom. Especially when it pertains to evolution. These answers create a lot of weird ideologies (luciferianism)....Especially from people on the west coast.:lol:

mctavish23
05-06-14, 10:32 PM
The first research study on what is now called ADHD, was in the 1700's (Sir Alexander

Crichton's 1798 study, which first addressed "mental restlessness"). Subjective (inner)

restlessness, is now considered to be a core feature of adult "hyperactivity."

Any type of illness will likely exacerbate an underlying ADHD condition. At the same time

though, caution must be used in not attributing the symptoms of the illness to ADHD; as

they aren't one and the same.

For the record, ADHD is THE most widely researched childhood disorder / developmental

disability on earth, as well as THE most genetic / inherited of ALL psychiatric disorders.

It (ADHD) has Always been present.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Fortune
05-06-14, 11:25 PM
Philosophy is an interesting subject because its answers a lot of questions. I never went to college, but I consider myself self educated. I usually don't pick apart issues this deeply anymore, because after I finish picking them apart, I usually don't like the answer that I find at the bottom. Especially when it pertains to evolution. These answers create a lot of weird ideologies (luciferianism)....Especially from people on the west coast.:lol:

Hey, I'm on the East Coast!

It's all good, though. :D

Candyman
05-07-14, 07:16 PM
The first research study on what is now called ADHD, was in the 1700's (Sir Alexander

Crichton's 1798 study, which first addressed "mental restlessness"). Subjective (inner)

restlessness, is now considered to be a core feature of adult "hyperactivity."

Any type of illness will likely exacerbate an underlying ADHD condition. At the same time

though, caution must be used in not attributing the symptoms of the illness to ADHD; as

they aren't one and the same.

For the record, ADHD is THE most widely researched childhood disorder / developmental

disability on earth, as well as THE most genetic / inherited of ALL psychiatric disorders.

It (ADHD) has Always been present.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

I see. You are talking about the label of the disorder, and not the symptom. I only focus on the symptoms of the illness, because I don't need the label. My symptoms are all undiagnosable, and fairly untreatable. There aren't any doctors in my area that are going to diagnose or attempt to treat chronic fatigue syndrome, or the other non specific symptoms I have... And many probably won't even acknowledge its existence. So all I can do is classify myself by the symptoms that I have. If ADD/ADHD was the only symptom that I had, I would flush all of these meds down the toilet, and accept it. I'm tired of taking pills.....And they probably aren't healthy in the long term!

Almost all that I have ever seen doctors do is treat symptoms...The label of the illness often seems to be unimportant....And it can also become very costly for the patient having the tests done, just to get a label of an illness that can't be treated.

dvdnvwls
05-07-14, 07:55 PM
I see. You are talking about the label of the disorder, and not the symptom. I only focus on the symptoms of the illness, because I don't need the label. My symptoms are all undiagnosable, and fairly untreatable. There aren't any doctors in my area that are going to diagnose or attempt to treat chronic fatigue syndrome, or the other non specific symptoms I have... And many probably won't even acknowledge its existence. So all I can do is classify myself by the symptoms that I have. If ADD/ADHD was the only symptom that I had, I would flush all of these meds down the toilet, and accept it. I'm tired of taking pills.....And they probably aren't healthy in the long term!

Almost all that I have ever seen doctors do is treat symptoms...The label of the illness often seems to be unimportant....And it can also become very costly for the patient having the tests done, just to get a label of an illness that can't be treated.
I don't agree with this assessment.

Some problems do not have known causes. If the cause is not known, then treating the symptoms is essentially all that's possible, while the search is on for the cause. It's wrong IMO to criticize doctors for doing the only reasonable thing that can be done under the circumstances.

When you say your symptoms are undiagnosable, do you mean that they don't have a known cause, or do you mean you have a set of symptoms that all seem random and unrelated to each other? ADHD, for example, is a recognized set of symptoms that make sense together but don't have a known cause. (Inheritance being a method of transmission but not a cause in itself.) Chronic fatigue syndrome is another; recognized group of symptoms that belong together, cause unclear.

Having ADHD is usually more harmful than having the medication.

mctavish23
05-07-14, 08:47 PM
Interesting & insightful feedback. Thank you.

The "label" per se', is ultimately based on the evidence based (research derived &

supported) developmentally inappropriate + age & gender referenced, DSM-IV Symptoms;

with the caveat being that they (symptoms) create IMPAIRMENTS (Adverse

Consequences) in Major Life Activities = "Clinical Threshold;" not experienced by

same age / same gender (non -ADHD peers). That simply means that the METRIC for

(measuring) ADHD is DEVELOPMENTAL DEVIANCE.

I hope that helps some & Good luck.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Rebelyell
05-07-14, 08:49 PM
Next it will be HIV causes adhd,these things are getting more and more Ludacris here,just ridicouless.

Candyman
05-07-14, 09:31 PM
I don't agree with this assessment.

Some problems do not have known causes. If the cause is not known, then treating the symptoms is essentially all that's possible, while the search is on for the cause. It's wrong IMO to criticize doctors for doing the only reasonable thing that can be done under the circumstances.

When you say your symptoms are undiagnosable, do you mean that they don't have a known cause, or do you mean you have a set of symptoms that all seem random and unrelated to each other? ADHD, for example, is a recognized set of symptoms that make sense together but don't have a known cause. (Inheritance being a method of transmission but not a cause in itself.) Chronic fatigue syndrome is another; recognized group of symptoms that belong together, cause unclear.

Having ADHD is usually more harmful than having the medication.

I'm not criticizing the docs. Just acting out my frustration. Many people who have these symptoms such as chronic fatigue syndrome, also complain of other non specific symptoms. Nobody knows if they are all caused by different disorders, or if they are all caused by the same disorder. The illness is probably similar to the "gulf war syndrome." Many people who came back from this war began having non specific symptoms that they didn't have before the war. With me, they all seemed to start with this illness I had as a child, without a doubt.

The problem is that many of these symptoms can mimic the symptoms of depression (and ADD). Chronic fatigue, concentration problems, brain fog, malaise.....But it doesn't feel anything like depression....Then they will insist that it doesn't have to, because depression has physical symptoms yada, yada, yada. You will usually go around in circles with this argument. Depression might create very mild symptoms like this. But not this overwhelming. That would be like diagnosing the symptoms of ADHD as social anxiety. Or diagnosing mono as the flu (which often happens). Almost every condition mimics something else, in some way.:lol: That makes me question the credibility of the diagnosis. My symptoms are actually a much milder continuation of the symptoms I had during the mono infection/liver inflammation.

This is when I knew cognitive behavior therapy was a joke. There is nothing embedded in the subconscious brain that is going to cause these symptoms. These symptoms did not begin from the disappointment of fumbling a football during the "big game" when I was 10 years old.:rolleyes: This is quackery.

dvdnvwls
05-07-14, 10:48 PM
Do you need to find better professionals, ones who have a clearer understanding of what's going on?

MADD As A Hatte
05-08-14, 02:16 AM
Mono is caused by the Epstein Bar Virus

Hi Candyman, I'm very concerned for you. I agree with dvd, below. Perhaps you need to find professionals who can completely review your symptoms. I did some online research and found the following info about Epstein Bar Virus. It doesn't mention ADHD, my concern is that you have something far worse that has been overlooked.
All the best

quote
The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), also called human herpes virus 4 (HHV-4), is a virus of the herpes family, and is one of the most common viruses in humans. It is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever).

It is also associated with particular forms of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and conditions associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) such as hairy leukoplakia and central nervous system lymphomas.

There is evidence that infection with the virus is associated with a higher risk of certain autoimmune diseases, especially dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and multiple sclerosis.

Infection with EBV occurs by the oral transfer of saliva[7] and genital secretions.

Most people become infected with EBV and gain adaptive immunity. In the United States, about half of all five-year-old children and 90 to 95 percent of adults have evidence of previous infection.
end quote

MADD As A Hatte
05-08-14, 05:00 AM
Oh, and further to the info I posted above/below about cancer and HIV and Epstein Barr Virus etc., some current information about Chronigue Fatigue might perhaps be of assistance? Over 4,000 academic studies have been done in recent years, and the scientists are beginning to understand the cause of Chronigue fatigue syndrome. No mention in any of those studies about ADD/ADHD, so at a guess I'd say the biomedicine professionals / scientists and the neuroscience professionals / scientists have maybe done their homework and perhaps they understand the delineation better then less-learned folk like, well, me!

This link is to a current, trustworthy, accredited government information fact sheet on Chronic Fatigue:

http://m.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/mskpages/Chronic_fatigue_syndrome?open

Fortune
05-08-14, 06:30 AM
Also CFS is often called "myalgic encephalomyelitis" or ME because "chronic fatigue syndrome" is a rather trivializing name that fails to indicate much at all about what it is.

MADD As A Hatte
05-08-14, 06:52 AM
Also CFS is often called "myalgic encephalomyelitis" or ME because "chronic fatigue syndrome" is a rather trivializing name that fails to indicate much at all about what it is.

Yes, agreed. "Myalgic", I should have been more accurate. I was leaving it to the scientific literature. Sincerest apologies to all. Again.

Here's another link to a 2012 doco, a multi national consensus on the ME/CF condition. Strangely, again, with 50,000 cases studied, and 500 years (combined) of clinical experience, absolutely no mention of ADD/ADHD as a cause or symptom. Whacky, huh?

http://www.mecfs-vic.org.au/sites/www.mecfs-vic.org.au/files/Myalgic%20Encephalomyelitis%20International%20Cons ensus%20Primer%20-2012-11-26.pdf

mctavish23
05-09-14, 10:31 AM
fyi,

In my 28+ years of reading & studying the science behind the disorder of ADHD, I have

Never come across Any data supporting a causal link between Mono and ADHD. Just

saying.

mctavish23

(Robert)

Dizfriz
05-09-14, 11:02 AM
fyi,

In my 28+ years of reading & studying the science behind the disorder of ADHD, I have

Never come across Any data supporting a causal link between Mono and ADHD. Just

saying.

mctavish23

(Robert)
Nor have I.

Dizfriz

Candyman
05-09-14, 01:26 PM
fyi,

In my 28+ years of reading & studying the science behind the disorder of ADHD, I have

Never come across Any data supporting a causal link between Mono and ADHD. Just

saying.

mctavish23

(Robert)

Its not necessary to include this nonsense in any textbook of disorder symptoms. The people who write these textbooks assume that doctors have enough common sense to know that any disorder that causes fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome is going to also cause problems with concentration that are identical to ADD. If you stay awake for 2 days and then try to study for a test, you aren't going to be able to concentrate. This doesn't need to be spelled out for most people, and written in a textbook as a symptom of fatigue.

I find that many people on this forum are doing nothing more than looking for an "official" label, to justify their use of amphetamines. Many of these same people will begin looking for a new label, when medical marijuana becomes legal in their state.

dvdnvwls
05-09-14, 01:32 PM
Its not necessary to include this nonsense in any textbook of disorder symptoms. The people who write these textbooks assume that doctors have enough common sense to know that any disorder that causes fatigue or chronic fatigue syndrome is going to also cause problems with concentration that are identical to ADD.

You seem to have an interesting definition of "identical". :)

Amtram
05-09-14, 02:25 PM
I find that many people on this forum are doing nothing more than looking for an "official" label, to justify their use of amphetamines. Many of these same people will begin looking for a new label, when medical marijuana becomes legal in their state.


Ah, now we get to the meat of the matter. It boils down to "ADHD is a fake disorder people use to get drugs." That view isn't going to get a lot of sympathy, sorry.

BellaVita
05-09-14, 02:30 PM
Ah, now we get to the meat of the matter. It boils down to "ADHD is a fake disorder people use to get drugs." That view isn't going to get a lot of sympathy, sorry.

I'm trying to understand how people can even think that way...I mean, what causes their brain to actually believe that?

Believe that over what's actually the truth?

It's kinda fascinating.....

Amtram
05-09-14, 02:39 PM
Same kind of thing being discussed at the "attachment therapy" thread? It's easy to persuade people when you tell them what they wanted to hear in the first place.

Dizfriz
05-09-14, 04:52 PM
I find that many people on this forum are doing nothing more than looking for an "official" label, to justify their use of amphetamines. Many of these same people will begin looking for a new label, when medical marijuana becomes legal in their state.

How to win friends and influence people on an ADHD support forum.

FYI amphetamines for use with ADHD, when taken as directed, cause very few problems. It is when they are abused that the problems come in.

I suspect you are reading into people what you want to see. It is called projection and is usually not a very useful tool.

Another way of saying it is that you are just wrong. Accurate too.

Dizfriz

Candyman
05-11-14, 03:05 PM
Another issue with this mono infection was the non viral hepatitis (liver inflammation) that was a result of the complications of the mono infection. It created a condition called hepatic encephalopathy. This is the condition that will leave people confused and delirious when their liver becomes inflamed, because toxins build up in the body. It seemed to contribute to my long term symptoms of ADD, and other nonspecific symptoms. Has anyone ever heard of this condition? And what kind of long term damage does it do to the brain?

sarahsweets
05-12-14, 05:34 AM
Well I was jonesing for some antidepressants so I looked for a bipolar label so I could get my hands on some.

Ah, now we get to the meat of the matter. It boils down to "ADHD is a fake disorder people use to get drugs." That view isn't going to get a lot of sympathy, sorry.

BellaVita
05-12-14, 05:39 AM
Well I was jonesing for some antidepressants so I looked for a bipolar label so I could get my hands on some.

Yes because we WANT mania

Right??

MADD As A Hatte
05-12-14, 06:11 AM
Another issue ... was the (liver inflammation) ... Has anyone ever heard of this condition? And what kind of long term damage does it do to the brain?

Gosh! Sounds dreadful! I'm not a liver doctor, neither is anyone else on this site, from what I've observed thus far. Perhaps head over to liverforum.com to find some free expert medical advice on that one?

All the best, hope you get better real soon

namazu
05-12-14, 10:25 AM
Another issue with this mono infection was the non viral hepatitis (liver inflammation) that was a result of the complications of the mono infection. It created a condition called hepatic encephalopathy. This is the condition that will leave people confused and delirious when their liver becomes inflamed, because toxins build up in the body. It seemed to contribute to my long term symptoms of ADD, and other nonspecific symptoms. Has anyone ever heard of this condition? And what kind of long term damage does it do to the brain?

Here's some information on hepatic encephalopathy (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001347/).

Have you had an opportunity to consult with a neuropsychologist or neurologist, who could assess whether and what types of deficits may have resulted from your hepatic encephalopathy?

A cognitive rehabilitation specialist might also be able to provide some assistance, in the form of helping you develop coping strategies for those lasting problems that may have work-arounds.

mctavish23
05-12-14, 03:53 PM
Candyman,

I was diagnosed with Minimal Brain Damage (MBD) in 1972. Today, that would equate

with ADHD Combined Type. I recently retired (01/23/2014) from my 30 year position as a

Licensed Psychologist at a rural, non-profit community mental health center. During that

time I developed a specialty practice in ADHD, with children, teens and adults; based on

28+ years of continuous study on the science behind the disorder. Speaking strictly for

myself, I ONLY speak in "evidence based (research derived and supported)" terms; with the

exception of giving my personal opinion. What I stated above is 100% accurate. There's

nothing nonsensical about it.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Candyman
05-12-14, 06:54 PM
Here's some information on hepatic encephalopathy (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001347/).

Have you had an opportunity to consult with a neuropsychologist or neurologist, who could assess whether and what types of deficits may have resulted from your hepatic encephalopathy?

A cognitive rehabilitation specialist might also be able to provide some assistance, in the form of helping you develop coping strategies for those lasting problems that may have work-arounds.

This is good info. I might try it when I get insurance. The doc never mentioned it to me before. I doubt it will be much help, but it might be worth a shot.

It seems that people on this forum are mobbing other people off the forum, because their condition does not fit orthodoxy. It is driving people away who may benefit from these treatments, or who would like to give it a try. Most of these posters aren't doctors, and aren't qualified to determine who has ADD/ADHD symptoms, or who can benefit from the treatment . These amphetamines are giving them arrogance, confidence and knowledge that they don't really have. This is why I have always been skeptical of these drugs being used on most people with ADHD. I work in a "bluecoller industry." I once saw an overweight man on Adderall misjudge how much cat-like agility he had. He fell and broke his leg. I've seen many other people who suddenly become an expert master craftsman in every trade, when they start taking these pills. Overconfidence is quite annoying, and can be dangerous!

BellaVita
05-12-14, 07:50 PM
This is good info. I might try it when I get insurance. The doc never mentioned it to me before. I doubt it will be much help, but it might be worth a shot.

It seems that people on this forum are mobbing other people off the forum, because their condition does not fit orthodoxy. It is driving people away who may benefit from these treatments, or who would like to give it a try. Most of these posters aren't doctors, and aren't qualified to determine who has ADD/ADHD symptoms, or who can benefit from the treatment . These amphetamines are giving them arrogance, confidence and knowledge that they don't really have. This is why I have always been skeptical of these drugs being used on most people with ADHD. I work in a "bluecoller industry." I once saw an overweight man on Adderall misjudge how much cat-like agility he had. He fell and broke his leg. I've seen many other people who suddenly become an expert master craftsman in every trade, when they start taking these pills. Overconfidence is quite annoying, and can be dangerous!

Seriously?

You have nothing to back up your opinions, except more opinions.

I think the majority of us are not over-confident, in fact many seen to be lacking confidence.

Adderall, and other ADHD meds, give us a chance to reach our potential and truly be ourselves.

Those people who do SUPER crazy things, are probably abusing meth or something. And I don't think a person mistaking how well they can perform physically is necessarily a sign that the med cause that. That's ludicrous.

People with ADHD do crazy things regardless.

Fortune
05-12-14, 09:32 PM
Those people who show poor judgment are demonstrating some of the symptoms of ADHD (impulsiveness, for example). Heck, Allie Brosh has a comic on her blog specifically about how ADHD makes her think she can do stuff she cannot do, one of the examples being her inability to jump over a fence that she totally believed she could jump over.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/08/expectations-vs-reality.html

When trying to relate all this stuff you're talking about to prescription stimulant use, I recommend looking up "confirmation bias" as well.

Candyman, people here are disagreeing with you because mono doesn't cause ADHD. You can scour the research for years and you will never find data to suggest a link between mono and ADHD. Mono can cause a chronic condition such as the one you have that has symptoms in common with ADHD, but that does not make it ADHD and that does not mean it will be helped by stimulants in the same way that ADHD is helped. That condition can exacerbate ADHD because of the overlap, but that again does not mean it causes ADHD.

Nobody here is being arrogant or trying to chase you away, and no one here is posting from any kind of drug-addled stupor. People are trying to answer your questions. It is only when the answers do not agree with your conclusions that you decide people are just here to find ways to get prescription stimulants or are too addled by such stimulants to know what they're talking about.

Greyhound1
05-12-14, 10:15 PM
These amphetamines are giving them arrogance, confidence and knowledge that they don't really have.

This is why I have always been skeptical of these drugs being used on most people with ADHD. I work in a "bluecoller industry."

I once saw an overweight man on Adderall misjudge how much cat-like agility he had.

I've seen many other people who suddenly become an expert master craftsman in every trade, when they start taking these pills.

Overconfidence is quite annoying, and can be dangerous!

I have broken up your post so people with real ADHD have enough focus to read it and respond. It's nice to see you don't mind asking adderall junkies for advice.

Mctavish23 broke it down for you and you still have the same responses.
He is an expert in the field of ADHD and is more than qualified.

See why people disagree with you. Facts trump fat guys taking adderall and misjudging their catlike agility.

Fortune
05-12-14, 10:34 PM
Also decades of research validating the use of stimulants to treat ADHD kind of counters the "when I see people take stimulants it makes them incompetent" theory.

Candyman
05-12-14, 10:35 PM
Those people who show poor judgment are demonstrating some of the symptoms of ADHD (impulsiveness, for example). Heck, Allie Brosh has a comic on her blog specifically about how ADHD makes her think she can do stuff she cannot do, one of the examples being her inability to jump over a fence that she totally believed she could jump over.

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/08/expectations-vs-reality.html

When trying to relate all this stuff you're talking about to prescription stimulant use, I recommend looking up "confirmation bias" as well.

Candyman, people here are disagreeing with you because mono doesn't cause ADHD. You can scour the research for years and you will never find data to suggest a link between mono and ADHD. Mono can cause a chronic condition such as the one you have that has symptoms in common with ADHD, but that does not make it ADHD and that does not mean it will be helped by stimulants in the same way that ADHD is helped. That condition can exacerbate ADHD because of the overlap, but that again does not mean it causes ADHD.

Nobody here is being arrogant or trying to chase you away, and no one here is posting from any kind of drug-addled stupor. People are trying to answer your questions. It is only when the answers do not agree with your conclusions that you decide people are just here to find ways to get prescription stimulants or are too addled by such stimulants to know what they're talking about.

You can disagree all you want. This is supposed to be an OPEN forum that covers many issues besides just ADD/ADHD. People come here looking for other people with similar issues and possible treatment options that worked for them. That's why this thread was posted....Then it got hijacked by the typical mob of orthodoxy...And I'm not the only person who has said this. This nonsense is driving people away who might be seeking help, or answers. These symptoms mimic some of the symptoms of ADD, regardless of the label you slap on it. And stimulants may help some people with these symptoms. Have you ever read the prescription labeling on Vyvanse and other stimulants? It says that these drugs may be used for other reasons determined by a doctor. Again, we have non doctors giving their expert opinions.

Fortune
05-12-14, 10:45 PM
My non-doctor opinion was that you should discuss using stimulants for your condition with your doctor. Not that it would never work, or that you were wrong to pursue this line of questioning.

I did say that it's possible stimulants won't help you - there are other conditions that cause similar problems that simply are not helped by stimulants, so it's not much of a stretch to suggest that may be a possibility.

I am aware of off-label uses.

No one here attacked you, but you've gone on the defensive and lashed out at people. That's completely unnecessary.

mctavish23
05-12-14, 10:55 PM
fyi,

The research on the use of stimulants for the treatment of (evidence based) ADHD, from

an informed physician, strongly supports a significant DECREASE in the Risk of developing

a Substance Use Disorder (SUD).

I presented those data to our local Drug Court on 10/31/2013; leading to a Policy Change

in terms of allowing their client's to continue taking their (ADHD) medication (from an

informed physician, i.e., knows the patient is an addict + is in Drug Court).

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Lunacie
05-12-14, 11:02 PM
You can disagree all you want. This is supposed to be an OPEN forum that covers many issues besides just ADD/ADHD. People come here looking for other people with similar issues and possible treatment options that worked for them. That's why this thread was posted....Then it got hijacked by the typical mob of orthodoxy...And I'm not the only person who has said this. This nonsense is driving people away who might be seeking help, or answers. These symptoms mimic some of the symptoms of ADD, regardless of the label you slap on it. And stimulants may help some people with these symptoms. Have you ever read the prescription labeling on Vyvanse and other stimulants? It says that these drugs may be used for other reasons determined by a doctor. Again, we have non doctors giving their expert opinions.

What we post here is information that is backed up by replicated research.
If people are looking for stuff that MAY or MAY NOT work, we'll share whether we've seen any research on those things.

Many things mimic ADHD, and some are mis-diagnosed as ADHD, but that doesn't mean slapping the label of ADHD
on them will make the standard treatments work.

We are open to discussing alternative treatment options, though I don't know why you brought that up
as you say there is no treatment available for your issues.

MADD As A Hatte
05-13-14, 05:44 AM
This is supposed to be an OPEN forum that covers many issues besides just ADD/ADHD. ...


... This nonsense is driving people away who might be seeking help, ple with these symptoms.

Again, we have non doctors giving their expert opinions.

First point above:

No, this is not an open forum for "other issues". The address says addforums.com. The thread you've listed in is called "Open Science yadada" because the moderators needed somewhere to put the dodgy stuff that people post every time a news programme puts on a news item along the lines of "Man Bites Dog".

Secondly, on nonsense. From my observations to date, there are two kinds of people who come to this ADD forum. Those who are genuinely looking for help; and those who want to justify their immoveable position. The former group listen, learn, and pretty quickly get their insurance sorted, find a specialist who practices in their area, get a proper diagnosis, and come back to share their experience. The latter type are easily identified: despite genuine input from numerous respected forum members, these types are still pushing back, weeks later. making spurious unsupported claims, and banging on about how noone's listening to them.

Third point, no one here claims to be a doctor, nor an expert. Thats not what this forum is about. However, that IS why we quote doctors and industry experts. The expert doctors are off on sites like CHADD. Look it up. The experts are psychiatrists and clinical psychologists and clinical neuropsychologists. We collectively pay them shedloads for their learned advice, we read their books, and their academic papers. We do our best to share the info. We have one thing in common: a genuine search for understanding into our disorder.

Mate, feel free to start a forum somewhere else, and call it the NOTaddforums.com so people who do want ADD info don't lob in there by mistake, wasting the valuable time of you and your new forum's moderators.

All the best

Fortune
05-13-14, 08:30 AM
As a point of order - we do have forums and discussions for people who have different conditions, although these are primarily focused on conditions you find in the DSM. IIRC there are a few people here who have bipolar but not ADHD.

someothertime
05-13-14, 09:49 AM
you can't simultaneously claim that you (like most kids) had ADHD already as a child, and that mono in your teens caused your ADD.

Concur


it's plausible a latent autoimmune niggle intensified "inaction" in the OP's case ( similar to chronic fatigue )...

taking a look at the diagrams below... one would want to investigate any secondary / lingering influence such conditions have on the Hypothalmus or Adrenal medulla vecinities... once the teens are over, the niggle may be gone but the symptoms are maintained simply due to age and hormone stabilisation.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-spDOB7sJvoQ/T83-l93KJhI/AAAAAAAAABM/w639Y1vh9q0/s1600/800px-Endocrine_central_nervous_en.svg.png
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/98/Endocrine_Alimentary_system_en.svg


( in other words... i think you might have had chronic fatigue -> latent autoimmune issues )


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infectious_mononucleosis#Pathophysiology
Prognosis
Serious complications are uncommon, occurring in less than 5% of cases:[38][39]
CNS complications include meningitis, encephalitis, hemiplegia, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and transverse myelitis. Infection with the Epstein–Barr virus has also been proposed as a risk factor for the development of multiple sclerosis (MS),[40] but this has not been confirmed.
Hematologic: Hemolytic anemia (direct Coombs test is positive) and various cytopenias, and bleeding (caused by thrombocytopenia) can occur.[21]
Mild jaundice
Hepatitis with the Epstein–Barr virus is rare.
Upper airway obstruction from tonsillar hypertrophy is rare.
Fulminant disease course of immunocompromised patients is rare.
Splenic rupture is rare.
Myocarditis and pericarditis are rare.
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
Chronic fatigue syndrome

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_fatigue_syndrome
Cognitive functioning

Cognitive symptoms are mainly from deficits in attention, memory, and reaction time. The deficits are in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 standard deviations below expected and are likely to affect day-to-day activities. Simple and complex information processing speed and functions entailing working memory over long time periods were moderately to extensively impaired. These deficits are generally consistent with those reported by patients. Perceptual abilities, motor speed, language, reasoning, and intelligence did not appear to be significantly altered.[49]

Pathophysiology

The etiology and pathogenesis (i.e., the causes and mechanisms) of chronic fatigue syndrome are currently unknown, despite extensive research.[11] Research studies have developed and explored etiological hypotheses regarding a variety of factors, including oxidative stress, genetic predisposition,[50] infection by viruses and pathogenic bacteria, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis abnormalities, immune dysfunction as well as psychological and psychosocial factors. Although it is unclear whether such factors are causes or consequences of CFS (or both), various models have been proposed.[51][52][53]

SB_UK
05-13-14, 12:53 PM
Chronic stress.
Distress [ADHD symptoms].
Immune disease susceptibility (particularly viral).
Viral disease.
Even more distress [ADHD symptoms worsen].

The totally unsatisfactory observation that increased distress will worsen ADHD (as a stress reaction).

It means that we've a million and 1 factors which'll worsen [or even bring it on] ADHD (as in push you over a threshold) - none of which actually mean a great deal - in much the same way that you can have an apple, a pear or a courgette to satisfy your hunger
- but the commonality is hunger satisfaction and not how.