View Full Version : clumsiness in ADHD kids


witsend
03-28-05, 02:28 AM
My son is 8y/o, tall & weighs about 100lbs. He is forever stepping on my toes-even though he knows I'm right there, bumping into others, falling into/ tripping over things like a chair that has always been in its spot,etc....

Sometimes I think "...Oh he must be growing." I'm sure this is true at times,but lately it seem to be something every other minute!

Do you think that ADHD kids are just more clumsy as of a result of their not being able to "read" things going on around them or is it just kids being kids?

auntchris
03-28-05, 02:32 AM
I am an adult and still bump into things. And I took ballet years all those years ya think I would be more graceful.

Kimalimah
03-28-05, 03:13 AM
Your son sounds a lot like my inattentive ADD son. He has had more stitches, broken bones, concussions, than I care to count! He walked into a HOUSE...how can you not see a HOUSE?:D (now he looks like Harry Potter)!

He did a round of physical/occupational therapy because they were able to determine that his "musculature" didn't develop right. Because of perceptional problems he never crawled which lead to his back and shoulder muscles not being developed properly.

He also has played basketball for the past 4 years (he's now 12) and it did wonders because of the right brain/left brain development. Everything is done the same and is required (coach sees to that :eek:) on both sides.

I can tell you that he has gotten much better, though I think he will always be on the clumsy side.

Kim

mctavish23
03-28-05, 10:10 AM
Those were great posts. Here's some info. that I hope helps. Part of the negative impact of ADHD is the way it impairs the Executive Functions.One of the many impairments associated with this is how it affects motor coordination, including hand writing.

The term "Sensory Integration Disorder" has come under attack recently due to the initial research of "discoverer " Jean Ayer not being replicated by anyone outside her own students. The truth is that it was really offered as a theoretical framework and not a theory per se'. In spite of that, I have whatever it is you want to call this and have been thru OT twice as an adult.

My way of looking at all of this is to simply skip the semantics and recognize that I have a well documented NonVerbal Learning Disability (NVLD), which is really a fine motor coordination .

There is some long standing research that says children with learning disabilities ( I have a SLD in Math) have poorer muscle tone and coordination . That certainly was true for me for most of my life. The cool thing for me is that I love lifting free weights and try and hit the gym as often as possible.While I don't do "crazy" things anymore like seeing how much I can do in a certain excercise,I still love it.I also know that it helps with some of the sensory problems by way of improved "proprioceptive feedback" and stress relief.

In addition, hyperactive kids have been shown to be more "expensive" due to more accidents, including trips to the ER.

I'm not an OT and don't claim expertise in this but I did attend 2 workshops many years ago on it AND...lol... saved my notes. Unbelievable. No wonder I'm so disorganized and cluttered.:)

"Proprioceptive" simply means information sent to the brain thru muscles & joints. So you can easily see how lifting free weights would help me with any related problems.

The best book I know of is still The Out of Sync Child by Carol Stock Kranowitz.Its been around a long time and is even out on video.

Good luck and take care.:)

witsend
03-28-05, 01:03 PM
UGHH!! I had this long post ready to go & bumbed the comp on/of switch w/ my foot!!!! I know what you're thinking---that's where her son gets it from!! That's prob'ly true:)

Anyways....

Thanks for all of the repiles to my question. I really appriciate it.

I completely understans the comment "....that hyperactive kids can be more expensive.." Last year we were in the ER 3 times in 4 months, including the dentist!!

My son fell over the banister at the neighbors & kissed a cement planter on the way down. Split lip (5 teeth wide), bruised (I'm talking PURPLE!), one chipped & three loose teeth. He didn't lose any teeth & they don't stitch the inside of the mouth.

About a month later the same neighbor had a b-day party at the skate park
5 mins after it started he stepped off his board funny & broke 2 bones in his foot. We went through 5 casts, because he kept "walking" on it!

About a week after he got his cast off for good, he went motorcyle riding w/ my dad & burned his leg on the tailpipe!!

Thank god none were serious! I always tell him that I can handle the broken bones & stitches, but just to ALWAYS WEAR YOUR HELMET!!!! He does without a problem.

Toby
03-28-05, 05:51 PM
There's a condition known as dyspraxia which is often co-morbid with ADD, in fact it shares a lot of the same diagnosis criteria. This link (http://www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/an_overview.htm) gives a fairly good rundown of what dispraxia itself is.

Saying that, poor co-ordination is accountable by a purely ADD/ADHD diagnosis. I'm always walking into unmissable objects like doorframes.

witsend
03-28-05, 07:07 PM
Thanks Toby.
I walk into things too, but my sons ALWAYS crashing into, falling on, bumping into, stepping on, etc.....
I'll have to read more, I noticed that they're located in the UK, I'll have to do more research.

Toby
03-28-05, 07:47 PM
You might have more luck with this one (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dyspraxia/dyspraxia.htm)

Itsme
04-11-05, 11:31 PM
i am 27 years old and i have ADD and i know to this day i am VERy clumsy at times and my daughter is 7 with ADHD and she is clumsy but only at times.


Sandra

Gourmet
04-12-05, 01:01 AM
My oldest ADD son is the day dreamer kind of ADD.

When my husband and I bought our first home, we purchased a country dining set - it had the oak table top with painted white legs. The chairs were wndsor style and very fashionable at the time.

We would be having a nice quiet dinner and BOOM!! There he would be on the floor with the broken chair underneath him. So now we have three odd windsor backed chairs, a rocker, and a country bench in the attic awaiting repair.

It has always puzzled me how a child could destroy so many things while sitting in one spot!! :eek:

witsend
04-12-05, 03:15 AM
Artsmart-- something I tried w/ my boy was if he couldn't / wouldn't sit in the chair I had him stand at the table. no more broken furniture! He hated it but it did work .

Way Too Flighty
05-07-05, 02:51 AM
I often find that Ido clumsy things, especially burning myself while cooking. I do think this is ADD-related. I am just not paying attention to my bodily movements, and therefore I do things like walk into walls and smack my arm against the inside of the hot oven while removing a baking sheet. Everything heals. No biggie. But luckily I haven't given myself any expensive injuries!!

shinobi
05-08-05, 09:49 PM
im 18 and have the motor skills of a circus clown coverd in grease. Dropped my phone so many times i lost count after about 4 days of owning it. Wlaked into loads of door frames, forever smacking my arm against objects next to me, that sort of thing. Strange though, was always good with a fork lift truck, and you got to be dead on with them. odd.

scuro
05-08-05, 11:08 PM
My wife has said that it's not a vacation until I hurt myself.

From Dr. Russell Barkley on the subject -> http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course003.php


"ADHD-> Greater proneness to accidental injuries (up to 57 percent)

Motor Incoordination

As a group, as many as 60 percent of ADHD, compared to up to 35 percent of normal children, may have poor motor coordination or developmental coordination disorder (Barkley, DuPaul, & McMurray, 1990; Hartsough & Lambert, 1985; Kadesjo & Gillberg, 1999; Szatmari et al., 1989b; Stewart et al., 1966). Neurological examinations for "soft" signs related to motor coordination and motor overflow movements find ADHD children to demonstrate more such signs as well as generally sluggish gross motor movements than control children, including those with purely learning disabilities (Carte, Nigg, & Hinshaw, 1996; Denckla & Rudel, 1978; Denckla, Rudel, Chapman, & Krieger, 1985; McMahon & Greenberg, 1977; Shaywitz & Shaywitz, 1985; Werry et al., 1972). These overflow movements have been interpreted as indicators of delayed development of motor inhibition (Denckla et al., 1985).

Studies using tests of fine motor coordination, such as balance, fine motor gestures, electronic or paper-and-pencil mazes, and pursuit tracking often find children with ADHD to be less coordinated in these actions (Hoy et al., 1978; Mariani & Barkley, 1997; McMahon & Greenberg, 1977; Moffitt, 1990; Shaywitz & Shaywitz, 1985; Ullman et al., 1978). Simple motor speed, as measured by finger-tapping rate or grooved pegboard tests, does not seem to be as affected in ADHD as is the execution of complex, coordinated sequences of motor movements (Barkley, Murphy, & Kwasnik, 1996a; Breen, 1989; Grodzinsky & Diamond, 1992; Mariani & Barkley, 1997; Marcotte & Stern, 1997; Seidman et al., 1995, 1996). The bulk of the available evidence, therefore, supports the existence of deficits in motor control, particularly when motor sequences must be performed, in those with ADHD".

witsend
05-09-05, 02:07 AM
Ok I hit my head on the low doorway to my shed about 4 times in 15 mins today!!!

jazzper
05-11-05, 02:39 PM
My son is 8y/o, tall & weighs about 100lbs. He is forever stepping on my toes-even though he knows I'm right there, bumping into others, falling into/ tripping over things like a chair that has always been in its spot,etc....

Sometimes I think "...Oh he must be growing." I'm sure this is true at times,but lately it seem to be something every other minute!

Do you think that ADHD kids are just more clumsy as of a result of their not being able to "read" things going on around them or is it just kids being kids?
Some of the ADHD books talk about clumsiness and lack of gross motor skills. Check out the www.amenclinic.com (http://www.amenclinic.com) website and look at the test, I'm not sure if I saw it there or not. I know for my son, he had trouble learning to hop, skip, jump, ride a bike, normal kid stuff. He' about 55 pounds, and 4 ft. 8, so pretty avg. for his age. The other day I discovered that he'd never really learned how to swing! My favorite thing to do as a kid! Anyway, we'd worked on it before he went to school, and then I just assumed he'd continue to swing on the playground. I was so sad when I discovered he couldn't do it. He doesn't bump into things, but I do. I feel like people and some things have a magnet in them, and I lose my balance and knock into them. Looks like I'm drunk I guess, but I don't drink. My kids all love Dance Dance Revolution with the dance pad. They play it on the Playstation 2. It works wonders for coordination, and is great exercise. Maybe try that too.

Find a good psychiatrist, who's an ADD specialist, and go get him checked out, can't hurt, and might help a lot.
Good luck!

jlscott252
05-11-05, 03:18 PM
What is this Amen clinic????? It seems like it tries to include any symptoms you have, as ADHD, IMO.....Maybe, the child is lacking in gross motor skills, and just needs some extra help!

Andrew
05-11-05, 03:50 PM
...Maybe, the child is lacking in gross motor skills, and just needs some extra help!


Maybe you're right, maybe you're wrong...only a qualified, experienced diagnostician should diagnose. The Amen Clinic, like other web resources, can only make suggestions and provide examples of symptoms and likely diagnoses.

jlscott252
05-14-05, 11:18 AM
I have a 9 year old, with ADHD, and he is SO accident-prone. Everytime he goes out, or goes to school, he is getting scratches or bruises. I am glad we have good heath insurance. He is really impulsive and hyperactive.

Nucking_Futs
05-14-05, 02:51 PM
I have a 9 year old, with ADHD, and he is SO accident-prone. Everytime he goes out, or goes to school, he is getting scratches or bruises. I am glad we have good heath insurance. He is really impulsive and hyperactive.


Sounds very much like my son. Luckily, we have good health insurance as well. But, this year he seems to have gotten used to his quickly growing body and has had less accidents now his injuries are mostly on purpose. I mean how do you accidently jam a pencil so far in your ear that the eraser gets sucked off when you pull it out? How do you accidently get things stuck up your nose? I can't wait for the phase to end as well. :rolleyes:

jlscott252
05-14-05, 05:25 PM
Oh, Jeez..luckily, he hasn't done that stuff yet, but he does really impulsive things. Ouch, sticking a pencil that far in his ear..sounds painful. He does impulsive things, like when I turned my back for a second, rode his ride-on scooter down the road, shooting his brother in the back with a squirt gun, playing limbo, with the toilet plunger...very gross, but he learned that the plunger sticks to the door, and he was playing limbo, locked me out of the house....UGH! It seems to be getting worse, as he is getting older, too.

Hopefully, your son will be out of this stage soon. Good luck! I know how you feel.

Lisa

Nucking_Futs
05-14-05, 08:40 PM
I much rather this stage to the teen stage. Somehow I don't think I'm going to enjoy that stage much. But, I suppose you have to take the good with the bad and hope you survive. lol

I agree about the toilet plunger...EWWW Koda once came out of the bathroom with our sticking out his belt loop as if it were Luke Skywalker's sabor really grossed me out. lol

Ichpuchtli
05-14-05, 08:44 PM
I think the clumsiness will just pass. I had I know some people who had it but lost it. I think it comes with confidence, like holding a glass in one hand. I know quite a bit about how younger minds work with evryday things and clumsiness is one of them they will over come it if it is not a sever mental problem.

Nucking_Futs
05-14-05, 08:50 PM
Unless of course your inattentive then your pretty much out of luck. I still walk into walls, doorways, trip over things, step on small children and animals, knock people over with my butt as I'm backing up. But, then people and animals should get out of my way do they not know I have right of way? sheesh.

jlscott252
05-14-05, 08:56 PM
Cherity,
I am not looking forward to the teen years, either. He's a handful now, I can't imagine the teen years. But, like you said, you take the good with the bad.

LOL, about the luke skywalker plunger incident. That's something my son would do. He loves star wars. He's looking forward to the new one, that will be on soon.

Have a good night!
Lisa

witsend
05-15-05, 02:08 AM
jlscott-did you know its rated pg-13? supposed to be really graphic..

jlscott252
05-15-05, 09:05 AM
No, I didn't. Thanks for mentioning!

Mom2Adam&Katie
05-15-05, 11:09 AM
Yeah, the new Star Wars movie is the only one to be rated PG-13, all the others were just PG.

Nucking_Futs
05-15-05, 06:49 PM
Hey girls perfect excuse to go to the movies without your kids. You've got to make sure it doesn't contain anything they haven't already seen. I mean honestly some of the Disney movies leave me a little shocked.

jlscott252
05-15-05, 07:31 PM
I think my husband and I, are going to see it first, and see what it is like....yep, you are right...good excuse for us to have a couples night out. It's been a while, since we've been out alone.

I know what you mean, about some of the Disney movies. Being that they are for kids, I am surprised by some of the content, that is displayed.