View Full Version : Relaxation


slammer21
05-30-14, 11:03 AM
Hello everyone,

I haven't been on the forum in awhile, but I figured I would pop in and say a few thoughts.

Relaxation is not easy for me. I currently take Wellbutrin every morning along with a multi-vitamin. Throughout the day I am constantly go go go and I don't know how to just let go and relax. I see other people do it so easily and it frustrates me because i'm so high-strung and I don't know how to take deep breathes, especially in high-stress situations. I work at a call center and get overwhelmed but multiple tasks I have to complete. I have dabbled in Yoga a little bit, but still seem to get no satisfaction. Why is it so hard for me to just let go? When I actually do relax it's like one or the other, either I am working too hard, and not working hard enough, for me there is no "happy medium". Any suggestions for me? They would be greatly appreciated! :)

dvdnvwls
05-30-14, 04:05 PM
Do you think it's possible that you're kind of in an "emergency extreme-stress mode" most of the time at work? Some of us end up doing that. If at all possible, finding a way to do your job in "normal work mode" might help. (If you're an ambulance paramedic you can probably afford to do your job in stress mode all the time - but working in a call centre doesn't have the down time in between calls to allow you to recover.)

Greyhound1
05-30-14, 08:49 PM
Hey Slammer it's been a while,:)
Glad your back!

How well is the Welbutrin working for your ADHD? It doesn't sound like it's helping much with stress and anxiety. It's hard to say though since you just experienced a major move, new job and life change. That is usually very stressful for most of us.

I just know that when my ADHD is under control is helps greatly with my ability to cope and handle stress.

omzzkk
05-31-14, 09:05 AM
Keep practicing calmness through meditation. Not sure what kind of yoga you're doing but it may be worth giving it another shot. It's definitely helped me out a lot. Bickram yoga or any hot yoga is great. Martial arts is another form of moving meditation. Pair some of these activities or other exercises with 15 minute meditation and see if you don't find an improvement. It's not going to happen immediately but practice, practice, practice.

I found the tutorials on this site really insightful.
http://learning.tergar.org/

sarahsweets
06-01-14, 08:03 AM
I will tell you what has saved my as* and thats exercise. I never would have believed it until 3 months ago. I would have told me to f**k off if it had been suggested to me to exercise for stress. I started working out for my physical health and to build a healthy replacement for myself as I wind down from smoking. It has done SO MUCH more for my mood and stress than I ever would have believed. Seriously. It sounds corny and unrealistic but its true. I started slow, by walking briskly and am now up to (mostly) running 2.5 miles in 30 min on the treadmill which is my personal best. I do circuit training and have some amazing biceps. I didnt need to lose much weight, maybe 10lbs or so, but that has melted off and the inches vanished. I have definition in parts of my body that I thought were hopeless. Aside from the self confidence this brings, the physical action of good cardio has found long lost endorphins that I thought were gone for good.

slammer21
06-01-14, 12:21 PM
Do you think it's possible that you're kind of in an "emergency extreme-stress mode" most of the time at work? Some of us end up doing that. If at all possible, finding a way to do your job in "normal work mode" might help. (If you're an ambulance paramedic you can probably afford to do your job in stress mode all the time - but working in a call centre doesn't have the down time in between calls to allow you to recover.)

I feel like thats part of it. I am a very careful and calculated person all of the time. Ive thought about EMT but do you think ill be so involved through out the day that when it is time for me to go home im still wired? Its hard too for me to get to sleep when i get home from work. Ive found that sometimes if i do something that i enjoy once every day that it relaxes me some.

slammer21
06-01-14, 12:27 PM
Hey Slammer it's been a while,:)
Glad your back!

How well is the Welbutrin working for your ADHD? It doesn't sound like it's helping much with stress and anxiety. It's hard to say though since you just experienced a major move, new job and life change. That is usually very stressful for most of us.

I just know that when my ADHD is under control is helps greatly with my ability to cope and handle stress.

My Wellbutrin is okay in keeping me calm, but it makes me feel so serious. Its hard for me to let go and be accepting of stressful situations. I try to maintain control over everything. When I dont take it l, I feel more like myself. Is it possible to find the right medication that still allows you to keep your personality? Or is everything simply in my head?

And you may be right. I am under stress because of these big changes. Is this what being an Adult feels like?

slammer21
06-01-14, 12:29 PM
Keep practicing calmness through meditation. Not sure what kind of yoga you're doing but it may be worth giving it another shot. It's definitely helped me out a lot. Bickram yoga or any hot yoga is great. Martial arts is another form of moving meditation. Pair some of these activities or other exercises with 15 minute meditation and see if you don't find an improvement. It's not going to happen immediately but practice, practice, practice.

I found the tutorials on this site really insightful.
http://learning.tergar.org/


Ive tried Kundalini yoga. I guess i need to be patient. Good things can take time and i know Yoga is all abouy patience and letting things go. I will check out the link you posted..thank you! :)

slammer21
06-01-14, 12:32 PM
I will tell you what has saved my as* and thats exercise. I never would have believed it until 3 months ago. I would have told me to f**k off if it had been suggested to me to exercise for stress. I started working out for my physical health and to build a healthy replacement for myself as I wind down from smoking. It has done SO MUCH more for my mood and stress than I ever would have believed. Seriously. It sounds corny and unrealistic but its true. I started slow, by walking briskly and am now up to (mostly) running 2.5 miles in 30 min on the treadmill which is my personal best. I do circuit training and have some amazing biceps. I didnt need to lose much weight, maybe 10lbs or so, but that has melted off and the inches vanished. I have definition in parts of my body that I thought were hopeless. Aside from the self confidence this brings, the physical action of good cardio has found long lost endorphins that I thought were gone for good.


Thanks for the advice! I have a gym at my apartment xomplex and ive used it some and i feel so good when i leVe but when its time to go to the gym again i hesitate. I wonder why i resist something that is so good for me? I dont want to go because i feel i need to, but because i WANT to. What helped motivate you?

Greyhound1
06-01-14, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the advice! I have a gym at my apartment xomplex and ive used it some and i feel so good when i leVe but when its time to go to the gym again i hesitate. I wonder why i resist something that is so good for me? I dont want to go because i feel i need to, but because i WANT to. What helped motivate you?

With life being so busy these days, it's hard to find time and motivation to do things we want to do.

The things we want many times are things we need and may not even realize.
Maybe it could help motivate you by realizing you do need it. You need to feel that good feeling you have after exercising. This makes your body chemistry primed for relaxation.

Unmanagable
06-01-14, 02:47 PM
Diaphragmatic breathing has been a powerful tool in helping me chill out "in the moment" in most scenarios and can be practiced anytime and anywhere.

It's been the most effective tool to date, in addition to medication, for me. Yoga is running a close second, but I'm not as committed to that, yet. The simplest things that help the most are the ones I'm most reluctant to do. Dammit.

I found this link helpful in explaining the why and how with the breathing and shared it at a community meditation gig recently:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Mental_Health_Letter/2009/May/Take-a-deep-breath?print=1

Inhale the good s***. Exhale the bull s***. :)