View Full Version : Females On The Spectrum May ...


Lunacie
06-13-14, 04:04 PM
If your daughter hasn't been diagnosed yet ... here's something to think about.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/960117_758473310833447_415238764_n.jpg


Sorry ... the button for posting images has vanished and just posting the link doesn't seem to work. Huh.

atSWIMtooboreds
06-13-14, 05:53 PM
Men may do these things too!

Lunacie
06-13-14, 06:29 PM
Men may do these things too!

And the smaller group of men/boys that are like this are more likely to go undiagnosed as well.

At this point in time, most of the criteria for diagnosing Autism/Asperger's and ADHD are based on typical boy behaviors.
Girls exhibit different symptoms in most cases and have more difficulty in being diagnosed and therefore treated.
Despite having many classic symptoms of autism, my granddaughter was not diagnosed until she was 9 and even then
the label given was PDD-NOS rather than classic autism.

mildadhd
06-13-14, 08:52 PM
Peoples gender "appearance" might not be consistently predictable.

I wonder if it might be easier, to outline all possible natural gender spectrum ADHD differences?

(which specifics would depend on individual circumstances)









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Lunacie
06-13-14, 09:41 PM
Peoples gender "appearance" might not be consistently predictable.

I wonder if it might be easier, to outline all possible natural gender spectrum ADHD differences?

(which specifics would depend on individual circumstances)




P

I have no idea at all what your meaning is.

mildadhd
06-14-14, 02:26 PM
I am all for more female type gender spectrum ADHD related research.

I don't think there is any single female gender type specific ADHD trait or any single male gender type specific ADHD trait.

I think all known ADHD traits exist among all gender types, and all those ADHD traits should be considered, when any individual is being diagnosed.

(Specific would depend on individual circumstances).


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mildadhd
06-14-14, 02:46 PM
Underlined and bold, by Peripheral.

Brain World: Did you do any play research with humans?

Jaak Panksepp: We did perhaps the first systematic experimental research on human children.

But human physical play still has not been extensively studied.

Developmental psychologists usually only study play with toys and games.

We studied the play of two friends—pairs of boys and girls at 4-7 years of age—in an empty room with mats on the floor but no toys.

“Play and enjoy,” we told them, and videotaped their interactions for about half an hour.

We scored about 20 behaviors such as running after each other, wrestling, pushing from the front, pushing from the back, laughing, and so forth.

Surprisingly, there was hardly any difference between the play of young girls and boys, as the human play literature led us to believe.

A lot of people have claimed that boys play more, but we don’t see that in our rats or our human studies.

We think many of the reported gender differences in play are a result of learning rather than any intrinsic differences.


- See more at: http://brainworldmagazine.com/dr-jaak-panksepp-the-importance-of-play/#sthash.iGrwqlln.dpuf

mildadhd
06-14-14, 03:21 PM
The gender on my drivers license says Male, but I fit, almost all of the opening post link (https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/960117_758473310833447_415238764_n.jpg), topics.

I think, "All Genders On The Spectrum May..."



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amberwillow
06-14-14, 07:50 PM
Sari Solden's book on women with ADHD was my first helpful contact with a source that clearly outlined how symptoms of ADHD might look when displayed at the different life stages for a female.

My daughter was the first and only girl diagnosed (with ADHD) at her large high school... That fact alone horrified me, because statistically there were probably several other girls slipping though the cracks.

They had several boys with the diagnosis... The teachers just didn't have enough education and understanding of what they were seeing.

Lunacie
06-14-14, 09:19 PM
Sari Solden's book on women with ADHD was my first helpful contact with a source that clearly outlined how symptoms of ADHD might look when displayed at the different life stages for a female.

My daughter was the first and only girl diagnosed (with ADHD) at her large high school... That fact alone horrified me, because statistically there were probably several other girls slipping though the cracks.

They had several boys with the diagnosis... The teachers just didn't have enough education and understanding of what they were seeing.

How old is your daughter?

We saw the same thing with my granddaughter, she is 16 now so it was only 5 years ago that the teachers simply missed the ADHD symptoms she was showing. They probably thought they were just personality "quirks."

mildadhd
06-14-14, 09:35 PM
Sari Solden's book on women with ADHD was my first helpful contact with a source that clearly outlined how symptoms of ADHD might look when displayed at the different life stages for a female.

My daughter was the first and only girl diagnosed (with ADHD) at her large high school... That fact alone horrified me, because statistically there were probably several other girls slipping though the cracks.

They had several boys with the diagnosis... The teachers just didn't have enough education and understanding of what they were seeing.

Hi Amberwillow,

I was diagnosed ADD (inattentive) diagnosed at age 35.

In the book on woman with AD(H)D, are there any statistics/research, on how many girls are diagnosed ADD (inattentive) and how many girls are diagnosed ADHD (hyperactive)?

In the past I've read that girls are more likely diagnosed ADD inattentive, than boys?

(More boys show more hyperactivity than girls, making ADHD more likely/more obvious to get diagnosed, and ADD less likely/less obvious to get diagnosed?)


Opinions?


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CrazyLazyGal
06-14-14, 11:51 PM
Hi Amberwillow,

I was diagnosed ADD (inattentive) diagnosed at age 35.

In the book on woman with AD(H)D, are there any statistics/research, on how many girls are diagnosed ADD (inattentive) and how many girls are diagnosed ADHD (hyperactive)?

In the past I've read that girls are more likely diagnosed ADD inattentive, than boys?

(More boys show more hyperactivity than girls, making ADHD more likely/more obvious to get diagnosed, and ADD less likely/less obvious to get diagnosed?)


Opinions?


P
I wonder about the statistics too. On the one hand, I do think a fewer percentage of girls with ADHD are ADHHHHHHHHD to the point of safety issues. On the other hand, I can't help but suspect that boys who aren't ADHHHHHHHHD get missed even more often than girls with similar symptoms because those boys seem "okay" in comparison to their more hyperactive and impulsive counterparts.

fracturedstory
06-15-14, 08:03 AM
That image looks like it's about girls on the autistic spectrum. Remember, people with ADHD have better social development than those with autism.

I found a good article about girls with ADHD and how they manifest their symptoms on ADDITUDE magazines site. I'll dig it up.

fracturedstory
06-15-14, 08:04 AM
Bada bing:

http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/80/

Don't you just love that first image?

Lunacie
06-15-14, 10:39 AM
That image looks like it's about girls on the autistic spectrum. Remember, people with ADHD have better social development than those with autism.

I found a good article about girls with ADHD and how they manifest their symptoms on ADDITUDE magazines site. I'll dig it up.

Yes, I titled the thread "Females On The Spectrum", meaning the Autism spectrum.

But there is a lot of overlap in symptoms between autism and ADHD, at least outwardly.

mildadhd
06-15-14, 11:32 AM
Bada bing:

http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/80/

Don't you just love that first image?

Thanks

I agree with the information in the link in general, although I would like add, that I am male gender type and was diagnosed with ADD (inattentive) and my case fits almost all the information your link as well.

I am also sure there are some ADD males who may suppress hyperactivity, can be perfectionists and can have anxiety issues, as well. (Me)

Although it does seem like female gender types, may suppress hyperactive symptoms more than male gender types, in general.

Could the differences partly be cultural?

It seems like the emotional environment and cultural expectations may suppress certain personalities types.

It seems like some differences among AD(H)D sub types are partly learned, in early life.



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fracturedstory
06-17-14, 02:49 AM
Thanks

I agree with the information in the link in general, although I would like add, that I am male gender type and was diagnosed with ADD (inattentive) and my case fits almost all the information your link as well.

I am also sure there are some ADD males who may suppress hyperactivity, can be perfectionists and can have anxiety issues, as well. (Me)

Although it does seem like female gender types, may suppress hyperactive symptoms more than male gender types, in general.

Could the differences partly be cultural?

It seems like the emotional environment and cultural expectations may suppress certain personalities types.

It seems like some differences among AD(H)D sub types are partly learned, in early life.



P
Some don't suppress hyperactivity - they don't have it at all.

I don't really think the differences are cultural. I grew up around some wildly energetic children and didn't seem to pick up anything from them. Your brain just doesn't get rewired because of the environment. ADHD- PI is not a personality type.

However, I had to learn to speak up for myself more, because people would still push me even though I was being avoidant. However, my anxiety has gotten worse over the years so I can't really keep my feelings inside anymore.

Lunacie
06-17-14, 10:20 AM
Girls are more likely to be "people pleasers" than boys are. Is that a cultural thing or a gender thing?

Abi
06-17-14, 10:23 AM
I think it has both biological and cultural elements.

TygerSan
06-17-14, 11:40 AM
The first post could've been talking about me, aside from the stereotypical girly interests (I was more interested in medicine/biology, and couldn't really care less about makeup and stuff), and perhaps the social mimcry. I seem to not quite fit with any sort of diagnostic criterion enough for diagnosis, but, aside from having major social difficulties, autism and ADHD are the two disorders that seem to be the best at explaining my quirks.

That might be why I have a really hard time thinking that *anything* in nature (including perhaps the notion of biological sex) is truly 100% binary. The boundaries are always fuzzy in a natural system.

It's not nature vs. nurture, it's nature *plus* nurture. The relative weights of the components may become more or less balanced, but there's never no contribution from one side over the other.