View Full Version : How I learned How to Study


InvitroCanibal
06-13-14, 11:35 PM
I think ADHD people tend to have two modes of operation, which are: "I have to" and "I want to." In fact I think all people have this, but, ADHD people lack the ability to pay attention to the "I have to" and their mind slips into the "I want to." But what is "I want to?" I want to, is really just stating that "I know why I am doing this." It has a clear and direct purpose. When you go to study, have a clear and direct purpose. Have objectives in your head and not just on paper . Ask yourself what you want to learn from your studying in this x amount of time and ask yourself questions about the topic at hand or what the topic at hand is. The key principle is ask yourself questions.

Once you have clear objectives in your mind, then write them down. The key is to having objectives in the head before they are written on paper.

Next, as you read through the textbook, and hit each papagraph, summarize the paragraph both before you read it and after. How do you summarize something you have not read? Simple, you skim it, the bold, and try to take a crack at what this paragraph is saying without reading it. Test your speed reading skills. See how much you can take in, in the shortest amount of time. Then test if you were correct in your summary. What did you get wrong etc. Finally resummarize the paragraph again and make sure you get what the paragraph says. When you do this, write down any questions you have in regards to the paragraph, maybe it loosely covers something or you just don't get something.

Save those questions and then continue on and do the same for all the other paragraphs.

Finally, summarize the chapter and then go back to your questions. See if you have answers for them. If yes then good job, if no then that's okay too, just ask your professor,class mate, or tutor.

I hope this helps, because I was reading these textbooks for a long time and it always seemed to go in one ear and out the other until I started focusing on the why and not just trying to speed read through it.

By the way, this solution to asking "why I am reading this," came to me in a dream actually. Where in the dream, I went to class and everyone in the room asked me why I was there.

good luck

dvdnvwls
06-13-14, 11:52 PM
I like that dream. :)

I'm not completely convinced that "I want to" is the same as "I know why", but I am certainly convinced that knowing why is an extremely important factor in some of the things I succeed in.

GRbiker
06-14-14, 02:07 AM
Nice and succinct. Approaching anything with clarity of purpose is paramount.
I also agree that "I want to" combined with knowing why is key for success.

The "have to" is still problematic for me. Compulsion is either a roadmap for obsession to completion, or steadfast refusal for me.

Addesso
06-16-14, 09:01 PM
Great advice!

Just dropping this book as I mentioned it to someone else recently. It's helped me immensely--and hopefully will continue to do so as I finally wrap up getting that dog gone bachelors! Learning Outside the Lines by Mooney by Jonathan Mooney and David Cole.

They have a great section on PhD Skimming. But throughout, they do mention that it's important to figure out WHY you're reading something, and how whatever you skim/read applies to that.

linlin27
06-26-14, 10:32 PM
i agree with this! i think also a good idea for ADD people is to cut out any 'extra'. As in trust yourself with the information you just learned. Don't write down every detail, it will help you recall information you didn't even realize you absorbed. Which i think is only an ADD characteristic bc we are so 'random' and we absorb and retain 'random' information that could later be useful

InvitroCanibal
07-07-14, 12:25 AM
i agree with this! i think also a good idea for ADD people is to cut out any 'extra'. As in trust yourself with the information you just learned. Don't write down every detail, it will help you recall information you didn't even realize you absorbed. Which i think is only an ADD characteristic bc we are so 'random' and we absorb and retain 'random' information that could later be useful

Ya I agree, it's easy to lose the forest for the trees.