View Full Version : Celiac disease?


SB1985
06-25-14, 10:54 AM
At my last physical a few weeks ago, I complained to the doc about some digestive issues I've been having, so he said he'd request they test my blood for celiac just in case.. and surprise! Came back positive :(

I've just recently been reading a lot about it and how eating gluten can affect things you'd never even expect, including psychological symptoms that overlap with ADD.

I've been an anxiety sufferer for a while as well, so it's seeming to all come together and make a lot of sense. Does anyone else in here suffer from celiac? Do you notice your ADD symptoms reduced when you cut out gluten?

Sorry if I'm beating a dead horse or anything, I ran a search and didn't see a lot of discussion on this.. Thanks!

silivrentoliel
06-25-14, 11:01 AM
There are quite a few things that seem to have symptoms that mimic ADHD, however if you really have ADHD, changing your diet will only do so much.

SirSchmidt
06-25-14, 11:37 AM
I don't have celiac, but my former spouse did. That pretty much made me go 95% gluten free.

I ended up losing some excess body fat and felt overall healthier and more energetic. To this day I still avoid gluten whenever possible.

Judging by the awful and debilitating symptoms that someone suffers with celiac disease when consuming gluten, I wouldn't be surprised if it could multiply the symptoms of other disorders.

I give your doctor respect for knowing about celiac disease. A lot of people go years undiagnosed and suffering because of it.

DichotOhMy
06-25-14, 12:16 PM
It seems to me like managing one's diet carefully is an important step to managing ADHD - and by that I mean that we just can't eat the same crap that the vast majority to people in the western world seem to tolerate. Gluten can be a common food intolerances, but also excess omega-6 fats (pro-inflammatory), simple carbs (pro-inflammatory, mood affecting), artificial dyes and sweeteners (linked to increased hyperactivity), and anecdotally, preservatives and other additives.

I think an elimination diet is an easy step to take, and one that should be considered in any form of mental illness. Personally, I tried eliminating gluten for over a month and noticed no change, positive or negative, whatsoever. That is to say that most processed wheat products contain a lot of other potential offenders, some of which I mentioned. Thus, I have no reason to assume gluten intolerance or seek to be tested for it.

Having actually tested positive for celiac, eliminating gluten is a no-brainer, but consider a trial of eliminating other things as well.

grape_ninja
06-25-14, 12:24 PM
Thanks for sharing this SB, give me some food for thought (pun intended). I believe some sort of elimination diet would be helpful.

sarahsweets
06-26-14, 04:03 AM
I read somewhere that the percentage of people who actually have celiac disease is lower than we think. Gluten free are the buzz words of the moment.

SB1985
06-26-14, 10:45 AM
I read somewhere that the percentage of people who actually have celiac disease is lower than we think. Gluten free are the buzz words of the moment.

Gosh that would be awesome if I were part of that group.. it's already been difficult these past few days realizing all the things I can't eat anymore.. They said a likelihood of false positive on the blood test is high?

Jenn1202
07-01-14, 01:55 AM
Gluten makes me very sick and I have been gluten free for years. Cutting out gluten might have helped a little with some symptoms that possibly overlap with ADD (e.g. brain fog and fatigue) symptoms, but I still have serious attention and organization issues.

Pentax
07-06-14, 11:16 PM
At my last physical a few weeks ago, I complained to the doc about some digestive issues I've been having, so he said he'd request they test my blood for celiac just in case.. and surprise! Came back positive :(

I've just recently been reading a lot about it and how eating gluten can affect things you'd never even expect, including psychological symptoms that overlap with ADD.

I've been an anxiety sufferer for a while as well, so it's seeming to all come together and make a lot of sense. Does anyone else in here suffer from celiac? Do you notice your ADD symptoms reduced when you cut out gluten?

Sorry if I'm beating a dead horse or anything, I ran a search and didn't see a lot of discussion on this.. Thanks!

Hi, SB. I just registered on the site, coming on to learn how to live well with a man who sure acts like he has ADHD who I absolutely adore. I've got celiac disease. I don't know what all gluten can do for psychological symptoms, and what it's a comorbid of, but I can vouch for having had terrible brain fog, depression, inability to sleep and get rest, and a whole lot of other symptoms, before it was diagnosed.

The best site I found online, when I was finding out what I had to do (avoid), to not be sick as a dog, getting sicker, was celiac.com, which is a clearing house of information. It had a comprehensive list that I dragged to the store until I learned it, to check what I could eat. It has a discussion board that was very useful. There are some doctor wannabes on it, who "diagnose" what they read in other people's posts, but for me it was really valuable to read what people said who really had the disease: what they went through for diagnosis, what tests, what happened to them when they went off gluten, what it took to keep what I think they called a "clean kitchen" at home if other members of the family were not celiacs, how to navigate eating out without getting "glutened." If you have it good luck. It's worth the effort to avoid it. If you cook, it's not an impossible diet at all. You can eat out. Board members will answer anything you want to ask.

It's a healthy diet. I have a relative who is gluten sensitive, but not celiac who feels better on a mostly gluten free diet, she says. I sometimes wonder if some of that is the additives, which keep things looking shiny and pretty on the shelves but are sludge in the body.

I'm getting long about this, but wanted to say, following up and trying for yourself a gluten free diet is WORTH it. In my case, it took 2 years to get a diagnosis (I got off easy; some poor people get blown off and bounced around for 15, before the aha. That's 15 years of being REALLY sick and getting sicker, liable to pick up more autoimmune diseases, and some do, very bad.

Try the diet for a few weeks. It's not a killer. With that celiac.com list you can go out to eat and you can deal with the grocery store. Health food stores have gluten free but they're $$$ and some of the products to me taste off, some are all right. If you and your physician are convinced, try it. I think you'll know in a few weeks whether something's going on.

In my case, a nutritionist listened to me and said it sounds like something related to bread, ditch it, I quit eating bread and I kid you not, I had a drastic improvement in mental clarity, really astonishing, after 48 hours. It took me a year for the other symptoms to disappear. Now, remember that as far as I know I don't have ADHD (anxiety too often, yes), so what I'm saying may not describe your serotonin uptake :)

Good luck. If you've got celiac disease, get rid of the gluten, it ~will~ improve your life, at very least might make the load you're carrying less. In my case, dazedness, & unable to focus were the first things to go. Heh, plus to scare you into it, if you have celiac disease, either you go on the diet, unfortunately not drinking beer any more (there are subs, but I'm a snob, I prefer my memories of Guinness, and I don't like the idea of faux beer), shifting over to potatoes from bread, etc., or if you don't you are doing direct damage to your digestive system and if you keep damaging your digestive system, with all that it relates to, you will perhaps kill yourself early.:eek: I do not jest. Needless to say, celiac disease has nothing to do with fads for not eating gluten. Good luck and get going trying.

Now I'll have to go look up whether celiac disease is a comorbid of ADHD. Golly, I hope not, might be, I just don't know, though the brain fog, and forgetting are a real part of it. I couldn't remember what I wanted to say to end a sentence, and for 2 embarrassing years would park in a parking lot to go to work and when I'd leave work at 5 or 7 I couldn't remember where the car was. 45 minutes later I was still wandering looking.

Wishing you well,

Pentax

Pentax
07-06-14, 11:29 PM
Gosh that would be awesome if I were part of that group.. it's already been difficult these past few days realizing all the things I can't eat anymore.. They said a likelihood of false positive on the blood test is high?

Hi, SB

Once I got the list of things to avoid eating learned, and convinced that I would do myself (as in early death) in if I fooled around, falling off the wagon and eating some gluten because (for ex.) I craved pizza, I stopped reading the medical literature. About the time I stopped, I think that I read that yes, there was about a 10%? chance of a false positive.

Your doc has probably told you that there's also the option of a biopsy of the gut (done through a gastroenterologist), but as I remember what they read, there is the possibility that the piece of the gut they take out misses the celiac damaged patches in the gut.

And back when, about 2007 the standard diognostic procedure was to tell the patient to cut all gluten scrupulously out of the diet and see what happens. That was the test that couldn't have false positives or missing the diseased part of the gut. If you got better on the diet, they took it as proof that you had it. That came after the blood test that you got.

...since I quit reading, I think they developed an enzyme test. You might look that up. If you go for more diagnosis with another practitioner, get one with the most experience of celiac disease that you can find. I'm very unimpressed with the medical training that docs get about the disease. A doc with clinical experience is the way to go. My dud of a doc had been told, in the week dedicated to autoimmune diseases (all 6 of 'em), that celiac disease only showed up in kids. B/S

Other than beer, you can eat a lot. Don't be daunted. Even the $$$ health food store stuff is tasting better. Roasted things when you eat out, salads, hold the croutons, steaks, hamburgers double cheese, hold the buns, all the scrambled eggs, hashbrowns and bacon you want, they have a decent pasta in the health food stores called Tinkyada, if you want spaghetti and meatballs at home. You can do it. I'll stand down but rooting for you.