View Full Version : Will Genetic Engineering Eliminate the ADHD genes?


ADDofftheWall
07-01-14, 08:55 PM
With genetic engineering coming closer to being used on human beings, it has been suggested that in addition to diseases such as cancer and Parkinson's, they will eventually find a way to eradicate genes that code for learning disabilities and ADHD. Do you think that will eventually become a possibility? That in the future ADHD will no longer exist? I don't know, I mean it does not seem to be that big of a problem on it's own but in conjunction with other factors such as learning disabilities and other issues, it would probably cause a great deal of problems.

It would be interesting but what about those of us who can't afford such high tech treatment. And if they're gonna eliminate ADHD and other psychiatric problems it will bring us closer to a eugenic society. If people could now enhance their athletic ability, intelligence, looks, then after awhile it would not make any difference in society. The reason that those traits are valued by society is that relatively few people actually possess them and there is a demand for only a small amount of people who possess those traits specifically athletics and intelligence, there will always be a demand for attractiveness. If everyone could play ball like Lebron James and everyone were as smart as Albert Einstein then the value of those traits would diminish.

It isn't fair that others are endowed with those but it really just depends on who one mates with and how their genes are coded and processed. By using the environment to help us over time, future generations will likely be better adjusted and will hopefully draw the potential mates who possess those traits.


My father is a brilliant engineer and he plays the guitar, piano, and saxophone well. He also speaks five languages fluently and reads Leo Tolstoy like it's nothing. On the other hand, I inherited bad genes from my mother not just ADHD but also a nonverbal learning disorder which is becoming increasingly difficult to cope with. I pray that if I do have children, they don't inherit those traits and if it's possible it would be good to intervene and prevent them from acquiring it so that they have a better chance of succeeding and becoming the people that they are meant to be.

sarahsweets
07-02-14, 04:30 AM
what makes you think that genetic engineering is close to being used on humans?

Amtram
07-05-14, 10:54 AM
The genes for the individual symptoms that have been found so far serve important purposes, but we have them in maladaptive forms. "Eliminating" genes is not generally a good thing, and we're a long way from figuring out the specifics that make the individual genes do what they do, much less altering their expression.

DichotOhMy
07-05-14, 02:01 PM
Practically speaking, even though there are significant ethical implications, I think it would be absolutely worthwhile to eliminate ADHD and other developmental disorders in utero via genetic engineering. This is based both on the burden to society that mental illness causes, and more importantly, the burden to the individual.

That said, individual, identifiable genes controlling ONLY individual, identifiable, non-physical "human" traits is an idea that has been discredited in the last decade or so. We still don't know how to control the gene(s) that manifest in ADHD, and there are non-genetic pathologies that can mimic ADHD so closely as to be effectively the same.

I'd imagine we're still decades and decades away from a Gattica-esque world of eliminating illness and enhancing people via genetics, but I think it's a worthwhile cause.

Amtram
07-05-14, 08:27 PM
I don't think it'll be a good thing, actually. Genetic engineering to eliminate known illnesses that are monogenic in nature, sure, but otherwise, we're bound to screw it up. Look at the suffering of purebred dogs - "desirable" traits frequently mess up a lot of other things in not so desirable ways.

daveddd
07-05-14, 09:07 PM
I don't think it'll be a good thing, actually. Genetic engineering to eliminate known illnesses that are monogenic in nature, sure, but otherwise, we're bound to screw it up. Look at the suffering of purebred dogs - "desirable" traits frequently mess up a lot of other things in not so desirable ways.

thats what i was thinking

is thought by quite a few that the vulnerability may be mainly a temperament , you go eliminating that , you'll end up with robots

RobotInDisguise
07-05-14, 11:02 PM
With Dave and amtram. Ontop of that ADHD is a spectrum thing and not purely genetic. Attempting to get rid of it is likely to screw other stuff up. Anyone else thinking pedigree dogs exposed?

harley2bradley
07-07-14, 11:02 AM
Genetic engineering or Nanobots will solve our problem. Sounds like fun to me, sign me up. Science never fails us and we always "fix" nature the right way. We are humans and are infallible. What could go wrong...I for one welcome our future nanobot infested ape overlord masters.

eclectic beagle
07-07-14, 01:50 PM
Take ocd, many researchers say there is a genetic component, but not everyone with genetic vulnerabilities gets the disorder. While it may need a genetic foundation to operate (and various experts disagree as to the importance of any influence for the ocd cocktail), it's not purely a genetic thing. That seems like sloppy reasoning, but I'm trying to focus on the supposedly "immaterial" environmental causes for the disorder. "Vulnerabilities" would seem to need a pairing with certain types of environments, and there's the issue that a seeming lack of vulnerabilities might be misleading until a person encounters a particularly stressful environment, and the disorder manifests. That example certainly isn't entirely analogous to adhd at all, but hopefully it illustrates what I'm trying to say.

ADDofftheWall
07-08-14, 04:19 PM
Genetic engineering is continuously blurring the line between science and science fiction. It is likely that genetic engineering will be used on humans to sift out the genetic factors associated with debilitating diseases such as Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. It has been suggested that once this takes off it won't be long before genetic engineering starts targeting more maladaptive traits that affect individual functioning including those that predispose an individual for the insidious forms of psychopathology (Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, etc.). Who is to say that they won't start doing that for those who suffer from ADHD/Learning Disabilities. Many who come from poor socioeconomic backgrounds and invalidating environments do not take advantage of the resources available to help and suffer in silence for the rest of their lives. If the appropriate intervention cannot be conceptualized than an individual will continuously suffer and is likely to get involved in problems throughout life.

ADDofftheWall
07-08-14, 04:23 PM
Practically speaking, even though there are significant ethical implications, I think it would be absolutely worthwhile to eliminate ADHD and other developmental disorders in utero via genetic engineering. This is based both on the burden to society that mental illness causes, and more importantly, the burden to the individual.

That said, individual, identifiable genes controlling ONLY individual, identifiable, non-physical "human" traits is an idea that has been discredited in the last decade or so. We still don't know how to control the gene(s) that manifest in ADHD, and there are non-genetic pathologies that can mimic ADHD so closely as to be effectively the same.

I'd imagine we're still decades and decades away from a Gattica-esque world of eliminating illness and enhancing people via genetics, but I think it's a worthwhile cause.


It might happen years from now, they might be able to control the expression of certain genes later in life. But then the ethical considerations come into play because it would bring us closer to a eugenic society.

Genes either make or break us, literally and figuratively. It's distressing to walk around and observe those who clearly won the genetic lottery, while the rest of us have been dealt some pretty bad cards. Personally, as selfish as it may sound, I have been dealt a pretty bad hand in life and every day is a constant struggle. It's because of my mother as she has the worst genes possible and psychopathology runs on her side of the family. Nonetheless, her family line is pure and everyone is in pristine health. My father is brilliant and the good intelligence genes run on his side of the family but there's a slew of health problems on his side. If I took after my mother, it means that I will probably live a long life without health complications but suffer due to my ADHD/Learning Disability/Other traits until my last breath.