View Full Version : Biofeedback and Neurofeedback for ADHD?


Austinnou88
07-07-14, 02:36 PM
Has anyone used this technology to help treat there ADHD? If so, did it work!?

sarahsweets
07-08-14, 04:54 AM
Ok, I was trying to copy and pastes some links but something is up with my piece of sh*t computer. But here is how I found some info:
Click the search button
go to advance search
type neurofeedback into the search box and change the drop down menu to ' search titles only'
You will bring up a ton of threads about this because its been discussed at length here.

AshT
07-08-14, 01:42 PM
I've heard a lot of great things about neurofeedback and will be doing it myself when I get the money. The person where I live who does it has ADHD herself and is a neuroscientist/researcher and she says the benefit is comparable to medication but better.

Unmanagable
07-08-14, 02:15 PM
I lucked into experiencing the benefits of almost a dozen sessions of the NeurOptimal neurofeedback method via an amazing practitioner participating in our community time bank. I was looking for overall relief, not specific adhd relief.

It's helped me reign in my what-ifness brain big time, I sleep without the aid of medication now, and my reaction time to having my trigger tripped has increased tremendously to provide time for more meaningful responses vs. repetitive emotional vomit. I wasn't too keen on trying other methods that would be trying to program my brain for me.

Here's a pdf file of a consent form from a practitioner offering it that explains it much better than I could: (for information only, NOT trying to drum up business for anyone and this is not the person I received services from)

http://www.shirleyjeanschmidt.com/doc/nfconsentform.pdf

sarahsweets
07-09-14, 04:34 AM
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50736&highlight=neurofeedback


This is just one thread I found.

NickBerger
07-31-14, 06:07 PM
I'll second Unmanagable's account of the mentioned neurofeedback.

Attention problems were the number one issue I wanted to change in myself when I got my neurofeedback equipment. Before then, it was painful for me to try to focus on accomplishing something I really didn't want to do. I would procrastinate and follow any distraction I could to keep from accomplishing what I needed to. Once I started using neurofeedback, I was able to get so absorbed in what I was doing that I would lose track of time! That was totally new to me.

It took me about 20 NeurOptimal sessions to completely forget that I ever had trouble focusing on what I needed to do. I've also seen many other people have similar experiences.

I know other forms of neurofeedback are powerful and effective, but I can't speak to exactly how well they work.

Best of luck with everything,

:)

-Nick-

immago
08-01-14, 05:46 PM
I'll second Unmanagable's account of the mentioned neurofeedback.

Attention problems were the number one issue I wanted to change in myself when I got my neurofeedback equipment. Before then, it was painful for me to try to focus on accomplishing something I really didn't want to do. I would procrastinate and follow any distraction I could to keep from accomplishing what I needed to. Once I started using neurofeedback, I was able to get so absorbed in what I was doing that I would lose track of time! That was totally new to me.

It took me about 20 NeurOptimal sessions to completely forget that I ever had trouble focusing on what I needed to do. I've also seen many other people have similar experiences.

I know other forms of neurofeedback are powerful and effective, but I can't speak to exactly how well they work.

Best of luck with everything,

:)

-Nick-

No offense, but when someone registers for a forum just to post a single post endorsing a product (by name) I tend to question the motives of the poster, and the veracity of their claims.

Kunga Dorji
08-01-14, 11:18 PM
No offense, but when someone registers for a forum just to post a single post endorsing a product (by name) I tend to question the motives of the poster, and the veracity of their claims.

You know -- that can be a bit dodgy-- but neurofeedback is not "a single product"- it is a technique- and it has multiple different providers.

As a by the way here - I have sat in with a neurofeedback provider for 3 days 2 years ago-- and it is a very complicated area.
There is a lot to learn- and there are many different techniques.

I would make a broad comment here that one critical issue in the success of neurofeedback will be the skill and training of the neurofeedback practitioner.

There is consensus amongst the practitioners that I have spoken to that proper application of neurofeedback requires a degree of skill as a psychotherapist.

I would second that-- one needs to be able to motivate one's patients and to understand them well enough to identify any barriers to practice that they are experiencing.

However- the issue of the skill ofthe providing practitioner does raise one big issue--- it is not possible to standardise neurofeedback in the same way that it is possible to standardise say a tablet of dexamphetamine.

This makes doing RCTs much harder- and it will mean that not everyone has such a good experience.

The principals of "buyer beware" and looking for a good practitioner-patient fit are very important.

Kunga Dorji
08-02-14, 11:22 PM
I'll second Unmanagable's account of the mentioned neurofeedback.

Attention problems were the number one issue I wanted to change in myself when I got my neurofeedback equipment. Before then, it was painful for me to try to focus on accomplishing something I really didn't want to do.


Now here is an interesting question: in what way was it painful? What was the physical sensation signature of that pain?-- if you can remember the experience well enough that is :)

This is a serious question. We know that the insula registers physical and emotional pain in the same way. We also know that people posture in particular ways in response to emotional states- and that these postures can induce pain in a predictable way.

I have a very strong suspicion that one of the issues in ADHD is that we have learned to hold ourselves in a tense posture when concentrating- and that that posture may create pain and excite a stress response that scatters attention.

The implication here is that one way the neurofeedback may work is by training you to stop adopting those postures- but to do so by rewarding the end point of adopting a relaxed but vigilant posture when attempting to focus.

daveddd
08-03-14, 07:06 PM
Now here is an interesting question: in what way was it painful? What was the physical sensation signature of that pain?-- if you can remember the experience well enough that is :)

This is a serious question. We know that the insula registers physical and emotional pain in the same way. We also know that people posture in particular ways in response to emotional states- and that these postures can induce pain in a predictable way.

I have a very strong suspicion that one of the issues in ADHD is that we have learned to hold ourselves in a tense posture when concentrating- and that that posture may create pain and excite a stress response that scatters attention.

The implication here is that one way the neurofeedback may work is by training you to stop adopting those postures- but to do so by rewarding the end point of adopting a relaxed but vigilant posture when attempting to focus.

you should thread this, id have at least some to contribute

daveddd
08-06-14, 10:15 AM
I don't know much about neuro feedback


Is it related to introception?

Kunga Dorji
08-06-14, 11:08 PM
you should thread this, id have at least some to contribute

I am working on that at the moment- it is complicated though- and I want to get it right before I open a thread on it.
I am finishing off a book now that has direct relevance to the problem.

Kunga Dorji
08-06-14, 11:10 PM
I don't know much about neuro feedback


Is it related to introception?

Neurofeedback deals more with external correlates (Video screen) of internal events (brain wave patterns)- though I guess it must ultimately increase interoceptive skill- but maybe at a subconscious level.