View Full Version : List of non-medicinal options?


mildadhd
07-13-14, 01:54 PM
Hi

I am interested in more learning about "non-medicinal" options.

Example

I recently decided to avoid fructose, lactose, and I find avoiding these, helps improve my overall capacity.

What non-medicinal options work for you?

Side note, this thread is not meant as a debate, "to medicate or not medicate".

But in addition to being medicated (or not), what else helps improve your life, living with ADHD?


P

ruby.149.42
07-13-14, 10:15 PM
Hi P,
I suppose it depends which part of ADHD as I think the different parts are helped by different things .. but for me I would say:

1. SLEEP - my Achilles heel when I'm stressed. Insufficient sleep and I reckon all ADHD symptomatology go out the window really. Stopping screens 2 hrs before bed is a big one for me.

2. MINDFULNESS / MEDITATION: have been instrumental in helping me manage my emotions, better manage low self-esteem, help with focus, help with impulsivity

3. EXERCISE / HEALTHY VEGO DIET, LIMIT SUGAR & CHEMS ETC - all these sort of lifestyle ones are about getting as much NATURAL vitality to your body as possible. If I don't exercise I'm far more emotionally reactive and stressed. And I'm talking about big cardio here - not yoga or chi gong although I also use those for relaxation also. Plant-based diet with little sugar and avoid processed / packaged food - simply because it makes me feel much better and more energetic and if I eat cr@p, I feel like cr@p and have no energy.

4. DRUMMING and DANCING: very helpful for focus and attention .. and brings joy and happiness! :)

5. GREEN TIME OVER SCREEN TIME: I've specifically moved myself to semi-rural 3 years ago because getting regular hits of nature keeps me calm. I did the pumping city life in big cities burning adrenaline for years and it was all incredibly stressful. Getting away from the non-stop horns, road-rage and increasing levels of stress in the city has lead to decreased stress on multiple levels which means reduced ADHD symptoms. TV sits in corner with a blanket over it and doesn't get turned on too often because majority of teev these days is stress-inducing + a big time waster that reduces time and /or inclination for most other points in this list.

So reflecting on that list after writing it, summary is that most of them are to do with stress reduction.

R

sarahsweets
07-14-14, 04:21 AM
Melatonin helps me sleep.

mildadhd
07-14-14, 12:31 PM
Hi P,
I suppose it depends which part of ADHD as I think the different parts are helped by different things .. but for me I would say:

1. SLEEP - my Achilles heel when I'm stressed. Insufficient sleep and I reckon all ADHD symptomatology go out the window really. Stopping screens 2 hrs before bed is a big one for me.

2. MINDFULNESS / MEDITATION: have been instrumental in helping me manage my emotions, better manage low self-esteem, help with focus, help with impulsivity

3. EXERCISE / HEALTHY VEGO DIET, LIMIT SUGAR & CHEMS ETC - all these sort of lifestyle ones are about getting as much NATURAL vitality to your body as possible. If I don't exercise I'm far more emotionally reactive and stressed. And I'm talking about big cardio here - not yoga or chi gong although I also use those for relaxation also. Plant-based diet with little sugar and avoid processed / packaged food - simply because it makes me feel much better and more energetic and if I eat cr@p, I feel like cr@p and have no energy.

4. DRUMMING and DANCING: very helpful for focus and attention .. and brings joy and happiness! :)

5. GREEN TIME OVER SCREEN TIME: I've specifically moved myself to semi-rural 3 years ago because getting regular hits of nature keeps me calm. I did the pumping city life in big cities burning adrenaline for years and it was all incredibly stressful. Getting away from the non-stop horns, road-rage and increasing levels of stress in the city has lead to decreased stress on multiple levels which means reduced ADHD symptoms. TV sits in corner with a blanket over it and doesn't get turned on too often because majority of teev these days is stress-inducing + a big time waster that reduces time and /or inclination for most other points in this list.

So reflecting on that list after writing it, summary is that most of them are to do with stress reduction.

R



Thanks R

Great list to work and play on.

Learning to reflect on happiness and joy.

P

mildadhd
07-14-14, 12:35 PM
Melatonin helps me sleep.

Thanks S

I've never tried Melatonin.

I would like to learn more about Melatonin.


P

mildadhd
07-14-14, 01:27 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KanfLqKXYg

kcas0772
07-15-14, 05:40 AM
;)Melatonin helps me sleep.

sarahsweets, how much melatonin do you take? I've been experimenting with Melatonin on and off for a few months and I'm unsure of the benefits. After I take it I can start to feel a little more tired, but I still seem to have the same sleep problems. My problem is that I constantly wake up. I have no problem falling asleep.

sarahsweets
07-15-14, 05:51 AM
sarahsweets, how much melatonin do you take? I've been experimenting with Melatonin on and off for a few months and I'm unsure of the benefits. After I take it I can start to feel a little more tired, but I still seem to have the same sleep problems. My problem is that I constantly wake up. I have no problem falling asleep.


For me less is more with melatonin. I take 3 mg any more than that and I wake up feeling like a zombie.

SB_UK
07-15-14, 10:24 AM
Not eating reduces sleep requirement.
After which - eat and delicious deep sleep.

Kunga Dorji
07-15-14, 10:31 PM
Hi P,
I suppose it depends which part of ADHD as I think the different parts are helped by different things .. but for me I would say:

1. SLEEP - my Achilles heel when I'm stressed. Insufficient sleep and I reckon all ADHD symptomatology go out the window really. Stopping screens 2 hrs before bed is a big one for me.

2. MINDFULNESS / MEDITATION: have been instrumental in helping me manage my emotions, better manage low self-esteem, help with focus, help with impulsivity

3. EXERCISE / HEALTHY VEGO DIET, LIMIT SUGAR & CHEMS ETC - all these sort of lifestyle ones are about getting as much NATURAL vitality to your body as possible. If I don't exercise I'm far more emotionally reactive and stressed. And I'm talking about big cardio here - not yoga or chi gong although I also use those for relaxation also. Plant-based diet with little sugar and avoid processed / packaged food - simply because it makes me feel much better and more energetic and if I eat cr@p, I feel like cr@p and have no energy.

4. DRUMMING and DANCING: very helpful for focus and attention .. and brings joy and happiness! :)

5. GREEN TIME OVER SCREEN TIME: I've specifically moved myself to semi-rural 3 years ago because getting regular hits of nature keeps me calm. I did the pumping city life in big cities burning adrenaline for years and it was all incredibly stressful. Getting away from the non-stop horns, road-rage and increasing levels of stress in the city has lead to decreased stress on multiple levels which means reduced ADHD symptoms. TV sits in corner with a blanket over it and doesn't get turned on too often because majority of teev these days is stress-inducing + a big time waster that reduces time and /or inclination for most other points in this list.

So reflecting on that list after writing it, summary is that most of them are to do with stress reduction.

R

That article on drumming and the head to head results of Drumming Vs Ritalin was so interesting- though, to follow up on Peripheral's comment, I think "either /or approaches to the problem are primitive and it is often much more useful to add complementary approaches to what is already working rather than to obsessively aim to avoid medication.

Kunga Dorji
07-15-14, 10:37 PM
OK- Here is a Biggie:
Earthing.

I have recently acquired a bedsheet which has silver wires through it and connects to the ground plug in the power point.

This is something that my friends had encouraged me to do for some time- and the results have been quite spectacular in terms of reduction in overall stress state and improvements in sleep. It has also greatly reduced my residual back pain issues.

I will start another thread on it- as I am very impressed with the science that demonstrates clear cut and beneficial physiological shifts upon earthing an un-earthed person.

MADD As A Hatte
07-16-14, 08:04 AM
Good thread.

I go by what current experts e.g. Solanto, Barkley et al, say about a combination of remedial (non-medical) and medical therapies being the gold standard for ADD treatment.

I agree with Ruby - looking after yourself in an holistic sense is really important. It's not uncommon for Corporate Chanel-suited Type-A Wonder-Women to find ourselves, by choice, downsizing a couple of decades later.

What I've noticed, and read about, is that depending on what stage of the life cycle you're in, you may be able to cope quite easily with high stress levels, unmedicated / undiagnosed ADD etc. But later in life it's important to make changes to suit current circumstances.

And I agree with KD about exploring new and different methodologies that may or may not prove to be worth the effort.

Fundamentally, though, I'm sticking with a pretty straight "diet" of ADD meds, and all the things my Grandmother told me about how to look after yourself!

PS With regard to Melatonin... back in the dark ages, before I was diagnosed with ADD, I had shocking insomnia. I used to swallow a half a jar of Melatonin to absolutely no effect. In desperation, as a working sole-parent of two very young children who depended on me for everything, I got a prescription for Stilnox (Ambien), and gradually drugged myself back into a "normal" sleeping pattern; then after about six months, I weaned myself off it. It was explained to me that sleep is a learned habit. I can highly recommend, as a temporary measure, going for the big pharmaceutical guns on something as critical as retraining yourself to sleep properly.

.

Lunacie
07-16-14, 11:21 AM
Good thread.

I go by what current experts e.g. Solanto, Barkley et al, say about a combination of remedial (non-medical) and medical therapies being the gold standard for ADD treatment.

I agree with Ruby - looking after yourself in an holistic sense is really important. It's not uncommon for Corporate Chanel-suited Type-A Wonder-Women to find ourselves, by choice, downsizing a couple of decades later.

What I've noticed, and read about, is that depending on what stage of the life cycle you're in, you may be able to cope quite easily with high stress levels, unmedicated / undiagnosed ADD etc. But later in life it's important to make changes to suit current circumstances.

And I agree with KD about exploring new and different methodologies that may or may not prove to be worth the effort.

Fundamentally, though, I'm sticking with a pretty straight "diet" of ADD meds, and all the things my Grandmother told me about how to look after yourself!

PS With regard to Melatonin... back in the dark ages, before I was diagnosed with ADD, I had shocking insomnia. I used to swallow a half a jar of Melatonin to absolutely no effect. In desperation, as a working sole-parent of two very young children who depended on me for everything, I got a prescription for Stilnox (Ambien), and gradually drugged myself back into a "normal" sleeping pattern; then after about six months, I weaned myself off it. It was explained to me that sleep is a learned habit. I can highly recommend, as a temporary measure, going for the big pharmaceutical guns on something as critical as retraining yourself to sleep properly.

.

After treating my anxiety for a few months, my psych asked me how well I slept.
I told him that I kept a low watt reading lamp on at my bedside all night,
and when I woke up and could not get back to sleep, I'd just read until I fell asleep again.
I had been doing that for many years and remember my mom doing much the same.

He suggested I try Trazadone which was originally an antidepressant/antianxiety med.
Like you, after six months I was sleeping well and took a half dose for a week or so, then stopped.
I do still wake up at night pretty often, but am able to go back to sleep now.

Flory
07-16-14, 11:47 AM
Lobotomy :), A minder and a treadmill in each room to run on constantly ;)

Flory
07-16-14, 11:50 AM
have you tried the special release formulation of melatonin, as a kid i used to have 5mg standard but im on circadin which is a special release formulation...i can easily stay up on it if i dont put myself in bed and follow good sleep regimen but...plus side is i dont feel anything from it in the mornings.

HADDaball
07-17-14, 03:39 AM
...
I told him that I kept a low watt reading lamp on at my bedside all night,
....


I've fallen asleep sometimes with the light on and woken up in the middle of the night. It's like the sleep was not that deep...

I much prefer darkness.

Abi
07-17-14, 03:44 AM
Alcohol is always good

Lunacie
07-17-14, 08:32 AM
I've fallen asleep sometimes with the light on and woken up in the middle of the night. It's like the sleep was not that deep...

I much prefer darkness.

I was waking up in the middle of night in the darkness - didn't help me go back to sleep.

mildadhd
07-17-14, 01:09 PM
Good thread.

I go by what current experts e.g. Solanto, Barkley et al, say about a combination of remedial (non-medical) and medical therapies being the gold standard for ADD treatment..


.

While I agree that people may benefit from a combination of medicinal and non-medicinal therapy options.

I think that remedial therapies are "medical" therapies, as well.


remedial

..to cure

designed to improve or cure.

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/remedial



P

HADDaball
07-17-14, 04:42 PM
I was waking up in the middle of night in the darkness - didn't help me go back to sleep.

That happens to me sometimes early in the morning.

Like 3, 4am..

I want to sleep till my alarm.. but ???

MADD As A Hatte
07-18-14, 02:15 AM
I think that remedial therapies are "medical" therapies, as well.

P
Thanks. Technically, the freedictionary.com definition of remedial is correct "designed to cure". However, in terms of describing treatments / therapies, one generally makes the distinction between medical and non-medical modes. In that context, "remedial" refers to treatments that are non-medical. However, I do see the potential for confusion, so on the forum I shall try to stick to using "non-medical" from now on.

mildadhd
07-18-14, 10:59 AM
Thanks. Technically, the freedictionary.com definition of remedial is correct "designed to cure". However, in terms of describing treatments / therapies, one generally makes the distinction between medical and non-medical modes. In that context, "remedial" refers to treatments that are non-medical. However, I do see the potential for confusion, so on the forum I shall try to stick to using "non-medical" from now on.

I would love to learn all about the non-medicinal medical advice/therapies, designed to improve ADHD, that Dr. Barkley and other ADHD professionals recommend.


P

mildadhd
07-18-14, 12:12 PM
(approx 2:58) "..all treatment must be at the point of performance and if it is not it won't work.

No amount of treatment done away from that place will solve that problem, only changing that place will solve that problem, you have to restructure the environment to help them show what they know.."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF1YRE8ff1g


i!i i!i

mildadhd
07-18-14, 12:13 PM
People often ask if one can "grow out" of attention deficit disorder--a good question, for healing is a matter of growth.

And the answer is yes.

It is not curing that ADD children need: they need help to grow.

What is required is not a change in parenting techniques but a change in parenting attitudes, based on a deeper understanding of the child.

The adult with attention deficit disorder needs also to gain a deeper understanding of herself, to undertake the task we will later describe as self-parenting.

The outlook is positive for the healing process in attention deficit disorder.

This kind of optimism is typified by Yogi Berra's remark, much beloved sportscasters: it ain't over till it's over.

Nowhere is this more true than in the life history of the human brain and the human personality.

We have seen that experience has great influence on the circuitry of the brain, and also that chemical changes--for better or worse--are affected by the environment.

If the wiring and chemistry of the brain are not rigidly set by heredity, neither are they unalterably fixed in early childhood.

The challenge of healing later in life is identical to looking at causation in infancy.

What conditions promote development?

What conditions hinder it?




-Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", P 141-142


i!i i!i

mildadhd
07-18-14, 06:19 PM
I would love to learn more about non-pharmaceutical, and combinations of non-pharmaceutical/pharmaceutical, treatments and therapies that have helped improve peoples lives, as well.

Before I was diagnosed with adult ADD around the age of 35, I could not organize my mind enough to read a measuring tape.

I just could not get it.

Along with my favorite professionals, family and friends at ADDF, pharma medication has helped me to be more aware of things like breathing and considering alternative options listed in this thread.

To be able to focus and read to consider possible alternative options before I started taking pharma medication, was not really an option for me.

Now I can read a measuring tape, even without taking pharma medication.

Still have difficulty focusing without pharma medication.

But I am learning things.






P

Kunga Dorji
07-19-14, 01:08 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF1YRE8ff1g


i!i i!i


Yep-- dead wrong.
My mindfulness works by nipping problems in the bud well before the point of performance. That man is a little too cocksure sometimes.

mildadhd
07-19-14, 01:40 PM
Awareness of pre-awareness Affective Biology.


Emotional Affects

-SEEKING System(+)
-FEAR System(-)
-RAGE System(-)
-LUST System(+)
-CARE System(+)
-GRIEF/PANIC System(-)
-PLAY System(+)

Homeostatic Affects
-Circulatory System
-Lymphatic System
-Nervous System
-Endocrine System
-Respiratory System
-Digestive System
-Urinary System

Sensory Affects
-Visual(seeing) System
-Auditory(hearing) System
-Somatosensory(touch, temperature pain) System
-Gustatory(taste) System
-Olfactory(smell) System,
-Vestibular(balance) System



(open to correction and addition)

P

mildadhd
07-20-14, 05:50 PM
Because some people have severe ADHD and daily use of pharma medication offers a clear benefit for some individuals, I think I should have titled this thread.

"List of non pharmaceutical, or, combination of non pharmaceutical/pharmaceutical treatment options."

P

mildadhd
07-20-14, 06:00 PM
My mindfulness works by nipping problems in the bud well before the point of performance.

Great point!

While I've always liked Dr Barkley's idea of changing the environment at the point of performance to help promote development.

I agree that mindfulness may help prevent or lessen the severity of some problems, before they become problems.



Thanks

P