View Full Version : Definition of a degree


InvitroCanibal
08-17-14, 12:01 AM
A degree is a piece of paper that required hard work and repetition
Which unfortunately only qualifies you for more hard work and more repetition

Starskii
08-17-14, 05:13 AM
What a degree should be:

A piece of paper that exemplifies your hard work and dedication to a certain subject. This should prove ample evidence of a passion. This piece of paper should then become a key to unlock a path in which you can follow your dreams! Not something that allows you to divulge in mundane tasks. The beauty of higher education is the fact that with it, you choose your ideal career. That's something that a lot of people won't have the opportunity to do.

InvitroCanibal
08-30-14, 04:11 PM
Yes I agree,

I am doing classes for the fact that college does open doors, but it won't make me capable in whatever field I choose.

I find people's expectations of College is that it will teach them important things about their field of study when it really doesn't. I've met Doctors who were some of the most ignorant and arrogant because they believed that their schooling alone qualified them as doctors.

Schooling, especially science, is always atleast ten years behind the current research which means that if you are not actively looking at what's being proven NOW then your knowledge will be 10 years+ out of date.

The best at their fields teach themselves outside of school and if you want to be Doctor, or artist, or whatever, then you have to be willing to learn outside of school because that is what qualifies you for a field.

I've talked to many people with PhD's, MD's, Masters, B.A's, B.S's, and almost all of them told me they don't remember anything from their formal education because it didn't teach them anything that was important to life or the field they went into.

But...it sure looks good on a resume :lol:

Unmanagable
08-30-14, 04:30 PM
Speaking as a person without a degree, I view it as an obstacle that wastes a hell of a lot of time and money and prohibits you from making much money, or even being considered for a job, if you haven't already followed their game plan and paid for one, or gone in debt for it.

Not saying it isn't important and beneficial to learn and gain skills, but I wish they would stop making peeps have to go around their a** to get to their elbow while never getting out of debt trying to do it. That adds a whole new layer of prolonged misery to the whole scene.

I've taken enough random classes through my years to add up to a degree of some sort, I'm sure, but not by their standards, of course. Wisdom is an incredibly valuable thing to me, but a degree, based on our current educational system, not so much.

Hathor
08-30-14, 04:37 PM
888 (Spring-Fall 1887; rev. Spring-Fall 1888)

I attempt an economic justification of virtue.- The task is to make man as useful as possible and to approximate him, as far as possible, to an infallible machine: to this end he must be equipped with the virtues of the machine (-he must learn to experience the states in which he works in a mechanically useful way as the supremely valuable states; hence it is necessary to spoil the other states for him as much as possible, as highly dangerous and disreputable).

The first stumbling block is the boredom, the monotony, that all mechanical activity brings with it. To learn to endure this- and not only endure it-to learn to see boredom enveloped in a higher charm: this has hitherto been the task of all higher schooling. To learn something that is of no concern to us, and to find one's "duty" precisely in this "objective" activity; to learn to value pleasure and duty as altogether separate things-that is the in- valuable task and achievement of higher schooling.

This is why the philologist has hitherto been the educator as such: because his activity provides the model of sublime monotony in action; under his banner the young man learns to "grind": first prerequisite for future efficiency in the fulfillment of mechanical duties (as civil servant, husband, office slave, newspaper reader, and soldier). [...]

F Nietzsche, WTP 888


I disagree...

There are plenty of repetitious jobs I have done and liked, but some may be aware I am not exactly a big fan of SLOOK (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1632708&postcount=3) (school). Is there any real research into this idea that monotony requires Skinnerian pre-conditioning, or do 'the experts' just assume that it is a good thing to prepare us?

Perhaps it makes them feel good to force us lesser souls in little boxes of their making.

InvitroCanibal
08-31-14, 01:46 AM
888 (Spring-Fall 1887; rev. Spring-Fall 1888)

I attempt an economic justification of virtue.- The task is to make man as useful as possible and to approximate him, as far as possible, to an infallible machine: to this end he must be equipped with the virtues of the machine (-he must learn to experience the states in which he works in a mechanically useful way as the supremely valuable states; hence it is necessary to spoil the other states for him as much as possible, as highly dangerous and disreputable).

The first stumbling block is the boredom, the monotony, that all mechanical activity brings with it. To learn to endure this- and not only endure it-to learn to see boredom enveloped in a higher charm: this has hitherto been the task of all higher schooling. To learn something that is of no concern to us, and to find one's "duty" precisely in this "objective" activity; to learn to value pleasure and duty as altogether separate things-that is the in- valuable task and achievement of higher schooling.

This is why the philologist has hitherto been the educator as such: because his activity provides the model of sublime monotony in action; under his banner the young man learns to "grind": first prerequisite for future efficiency in the fulfillment of mechanical duties (as civil servant, husband, office slave, newspaper reader, and soldier). [...]

F Nietzsche, WTP 888


I disagree...

There are plenty of repetitious jobs I have done and liked, but some may be aware I am not exactly a big fan of SLOOK (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1632708&postcount=3) (school). Is there any real research into this idea that monotony requires Skinnerian pre-conditioning, or do 'the experts' just assume that it is a good thing to prepare us?

Perhaps it makes them feel good to force us lesser souls in little boxes of their making.


When I look around for the reason as to why the machine mentality is bad for us, is that machines are much better at being machines than people are. If we go into life playing the machine, then how long will it be before our lives and jobs are replaced by machines. And the ones who created the machines were perhaps the creative thinkers that didn't use "copy and paste" as their mode of living.

InvitroCanibal
08-31-14, 02:43 AM
Speaking as a person without a degree, I view it as an obstacle that wastes a hell of a lot of time and money and prohibits you from making much money, or even being considered for a job, if you haven't already followed their game plan and paid for one, or gone in debt for it.

Not saying it isn't important and beneficial to learn and gain skills, but I wish they would stop making peeps have to go around their a** to get to their elbow while never getting out of debt trying to do it. That adds a whole new layer of prolonged misery to the whole scene.

I've taken enough random classes through my years to add up to a degree of some sort, I'm sure, but not by their standards, of course. Wisdom is an incredibly valuable thing to me, but a degree, based on our current educational system, not so much.



The question is, does having a degree diversify you as a job applicant? However, not having one doesn't diversify you either. People tend to have an either or mindset; "Either you go to school and get a degree or you won't find a good job." I hear it often that If a person wasn't successful, it was because they didn't get a degree, if they were successful it was because they had a degree, but my grandfather taught me that neither were true.

I worked for my grandfather when I was 12-18 in the summers, because he had his own construction business. He told me early on that what makes or breaks someones success is if they are poor minded or rich minded. He said that, The rich saw money as a resource for a prospective investment goal, they lived poor so that they could be rich where as the poor or poor minded people would live wealthy so that they could be poor. They lived to be poor because they did not believe they could be rich. "Why save if it won't do anything for you? "

The truth is I find most degrees (language arts especially) to be like the magic feather from dumbo. He uses it to fly but he never actually needed it. What he needed was the confidence to pursue his dream. It's this confidence that I often wonder is what an employer sees, that diversifies you as a job applicant. It's also enthusiasm for the field, and showing that you are dedicated to it which all root back to confidence.

You don't need school to show your dedication to a field of study, just knowing the field and stating you have a wealth of knowledge about this field while highlighting the key categories of it can often work just as well, in substitution for a degree, most often if it's at an entry level position.

Unfortunately though, you are right, in that for some fields a degree is absolute. The medical fields most of all. That's why I have to get a degree unfortunately, but It's nothing more than a hoop to jump through to get to the cheese, it doesn't say anything about how smart or capable I am as a person.

I get worried when I read forum threads on the add forums of people devaluing themselves because they aren't doing good in school, when that self value and determination is what it takes to be successful, they are being robbed of it through their education. The same education, that they are using and paying for, to try to be successful and make something of themselves is destroying that chance.

That is perhaps, the greatest disaster of modern education.

SB_UK
09-02-14, 05:25 AM
A degree is a piece of paper that required hard work and repetition
Which unfortunately only qualifies you for more hard work and more repetition

An invented event which guarantees University teachers lifelong earning.

An explosion in Uni numbers and in fees must make University teachers happy - their life is assured.

Except it's not meant to be about giving the teacher a lazy life - the student should always be of prime concern in all educational establishemnts.

Despite this being stated - it's a rule which is not adhered to - just one of those statements which human beings makes because they know it's the right thing to say
- but where the words themselves are completely meaningless.

Teachers can be replaced with on-line automated learning.

I've only ever learnt things by consulting references whicha answer questions which I have personally had.
Cannot learn information which is simply foisted.

The general answer to my questions is that we're not really sure.

So - although we may be sure of what is being taught in school/University
- the question need be asked of whether the student wants/needs to know.

Generally find that academics teach their specialist subject - some minute aspect of the whole ... ... now that kinda' education isn't of any interest to the student
- far too specialised.

SB_UK
09-02-14, 05:30 AM
So - after years of only education - my abiding reaction is - "yes, I can do whatever you're making me do - but I'm not too sure I want to - and I'm pretty sure I'm going to forget whatever you've taught me soon after passing an examination in it".

What stays with us - the constantly reinforced 'stuff' so language, computer language ie 'things' which seep into the mind and emerge effortlessly like driving, playing an instrument, drawing... ...

Sickle
09-18-14, 05:52 AM
I double majored in German Studies and International Relations but only because life experience credits could get me out faster because I could get credit for 5 German classes at the level of fluency I had. I switched majors tons of times, learned French, Spanish and Italian and got over a 720 on all of the SAT II tests... it was a waste of money if you ask me.

I had two theses, one had to be in German and I had to present both as well, one in German but all I do it tutor and interpret (in Farsi most often). I can translate the other three but not speak to them in it. My level of German and Farsi is as advanced as English and I sound Native. The other three languages have a German accent.