View Full Version : Can't study/read for school because of fatigue


kstate23
08-24-14, 05:44 PM
I'm ADD-PI and could never get the right medication, so I'm off all medications. I'm in graduate school in a healthcare field so I'm in the clinic a lot, but also have classes. I feel fatigued often when trying to study or read for classes. I always feel like there's a lot of unfinished work. I drink caffeine and it usually doesn't help on my really fatigued days. I'm very healthy so it's not a question of getting more exercise or eating healthier. I get enough sleep most nights too.

Does anyone have any advice to increase endurance and focus when studying and reading?

Thanks! :)

Traveler5
08-25-14, 06:03 PM
Just some questions:

You mean "fatigue" as in exhausted/tired/worn-out, or sleepy/drowsy? So you exercise everyday? How much sleep do you get at night, at least 8 hours? Do you usually go to bed and wake-up about the same time or is it inconsistent? Would you say you sleep well, able to wake-up and feel rested?

From what you're saying it sounds like you're not getting a consistent, good night's sleep and/or you're not getting enough sleep.

Ing3nium
08-25-14, 08:30 PM
I'm ADD-PI and could never get the right medication, so I'm off all medications. I'm in graduate school in a healthcare field so I'm in the clinic a lot, but also have classes. I feel fatigued often when trying to study or read for classes. I always feel like there's a lot of unfinished work. I drink caffeine and it usually doesn't help on my really fatigued days. I'm very healthy so it's not a question of getting more exercise or eating healthier. I get enough sleep most nights too.

Does anyone have any advice to increase endurance and focus when studying and reading?

Thanks! :)

I have the same problem!!!!! I'm always fatigued and tired, and I'm generally having over 4 naps in a single day. I tend to procrastinate and forget, and I also experience increased amount of fatigue when trying to focus or force myself to study.

I recommend you to 'try' the lowest dose of a stimulant.

Zoom Dude
08-25-14, 09:51 PM
I think feeling tired when your sleep patterns and activity don't warrant it is a symptom of not being sufficiently engaged.

I barely passed high school and vowed I would never subject myself to that torture again. Years later I realized college was the only way I was going to get the life that satisfied me. At that age I knew I had one shot to get this right. No way was I trying a do-over if I messed up.

Motivation is a powerful thing. That's when I learned that ADHD is not a barrier to achieving anything we have the fundamental capability of doing - provided we are sufficiently motivated. I ended up getting good grades and an engineering degree.

My motivation was fear. What's yours?

Another thought - when you say you feel fatigued when reading, is that another way of saying your mind drifts away from the subject matter? That's classic ADHD behavior, and it affected me too. What I did was to go into a total sensory shutdown every hour or so. I'd lay on the floor in a dark room, set my alarm for several (6?) minutes, then cease to exist. No thoughts, no motion, no awareness. Nothing. It helped me a lot.

If I was in your situation today I might try mindfulness meditation. Anything to get your head centered.

ZD

kilted_scotsman
08-26-14, 01:02 PM
I'm with ZoomDude on this.... if you're sure your sleep levels are OK, and you're actually getting a good nights sleep, ie you wake up refreshed and energised then you need to look at your engagement with the subject and how you study.

I've found I can churn through HUGE amounts of work in a short time if I'm engaged with the subject. If I'm not then it's best to do short chunks of study with frequent breaks.

There is a cultural expectation that productivity = being able to sit down and read/study for hours at a time..... it's as if your brain absorbs information at a continuous rate as long as you're "working"......

as if.....

THere's also avoidance and self sabotage..... which is more common than one would imagine..... if we get an idea that we don't succeed and that's part of our personal subconscous view of ourselves then we can end up with a pattern of behaviour that validates that view..... so that success doesn't happen and we don't get pitched into a place where we don't know who we are and have to rebuild our subconscious image of ourselves from scratch.....

Weird stuff.... but unfortunately more common than we'd like to think!!

k

Sekhmet2014
08-29-14, 10:46 AM
If you are not feeling sufficiently engaged with your work you might try this
time management tool that might help you. It's based on the work of a psycholinguistics professor, Virginia Valian and her original essay "Learning To Work," about how to work is online. She writes about how she felt she had been getting in the way of her enjoyment of her work (her thesis at the time), so she had to find a way to learn to relax and enjoy it, without all the negative self-talk and expectations that go along with studying for a degree.

The first thing is, when you are settling in to study, decide on what you want to accomplish. Then, and this is the Zen part, set a timer for a small amount of time, say 10-15 minutes tops. During that time, do nothing but what you have assigned yourself to do: no getting up to get a drink, no sharpening pencils or testing pens, or reaching for note cards. No checking your phone. Turn your wi-fi off before you begin, of course unless what you have to do is online.

The timer goes off and you can do something else for as long as you want to refresh your mind and body. When you're ready set the timer again for another small chunk.
You will be amazed at what you accomplish in these small chunks of concentrated time.