View Full Version : OCD/ADHD/Anxiety question * Advice *


livinlife
08-27-14, 12:36 AM
23 year old male and i relize i cant focus and never pay attention in school growing up. I have depression out of no where... Negative thoughts... Always over thinking things always thinking non stop and worrying, and i have all day anxiety and hyperactive at times.... Is it possible to have all these conditions and what is solution to do it

Tmoney
08-27-14, 08:09 AM
Yes it is possible. I have been diagnosed and living with all three for 45 years.

80% of people diagnosed with AD(H)D have a second disorder. 55% have a third!
I was diagnosed AD(H)D, with anxiety and depression in 1969.
My recipe for battling these disorders are;

The right medication
Discipline and structure
Healthy diet
Quality consistent sleep
Daily exercise (evven as simple as walking)
Support system (forum, family, fellow AD(H)Der)

But the most important ingredient to living happy and healthy with any or all of these disorders is a good sense of humor! I don't take myself or life too serious.

Hey, I have a few disorders that make life difficult, but it's the hand I was dealt and I decided many years ago to make the best of it.

My only regret in life was spending too many years suffereing in silence! This forum has been the best medicine I have ever had for dealing with my disorders, I hope it helps you in the same way!

"We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or we can rejoice because thorn bushes have roses!"

I wish good thingsfor you!

Tmoney
08-27-14, 08:10 AM
23 year old male and i relize i cant focus and never pay attention in school growing up. I have depression out of no where... Negative thoughts... Always over thinking things always thinking non stop and worrying, and i have all day anxiety and hyperactive at times.... Is it possible to have all these conditions and what is solution to do it


I was born and raised in Hollywood! Maybe its something in the water? haha.....

Greyhound1
08-27-14, 07:47 PM
It must be a S. Florida thing! I have had the focus and OCD/Anxiety issues for my whole life. Treating my ADHD with stimulants is the only thing that has helped after years of failed attempts.

I feel my OCD and anxiety are a direct result of many years of untreated ADHD.
I think it manifested from using worry and anxiety as a coping skill for ADHD shortcomings. Fear helps to motivate and never forget.

bobabuoy
08-27-14, 07:51 PM
I feel my OCD and anxiety are a direct result of many years of untreated ADHD.
I think it manifested from using worry and anxiety as a coping skill for ADHD shortcomings. Fear helps to motivate and never forget.

I've wondered about the same exact thing.

DJC-77
08-27-14, 09:03 PM
Yes it is possible. I have been diagnosed and living with all three for 45 years.

80% of people diagnosed with AD(H)D have a second disorder. 55% have a third!
I was diagnosed AD(H)D, with anxiety and depression in 1969.
My recipe for battling these disorders are;

The right medication
Discipline and structure
Healthy diet
Quality consistent sleep
Daily exercise (evven as simple as walking)
Support system (forum, family, fellow AD(H)Der)

But the most important ingredient to living happy and healthy with any or all of these disorders is a good sense of humor! I don't take myself or life too serious.

Hey, I have a few disorders that make life difficult, but it's the hand I was dealt and I decided many years ago to make the best of it.

My only regret in life was spending too many years suffereing in silence! This forum has been the best medicine I have ever had for dealing with my disorders, I hope it helps you in the same way!

"We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or we can rejoice because thorn bushes have roses!"

I wish good thingsfor you!

Excellent stuff Tmoney :) :goodpost:

Being older (55) and never diagnosed as ADD it lead to severe anxiety and depression.The only thing I can add to Tmoney's list is find a psychologist or therapist as soon as you can.The proper medication will make a world of difference and give you the will and desire to get better..GL

livinlife
08-27-14, 09:31 PM
I Have no idea guys.... not diagnosed with anything so far... just told u guys my sysptoms and I never been anxious as I am for past 2 years im now 23..... don't know where to start.

diet is clean, I workout and I feel life is so bad all I do is think all day about life and little things and then I get worried and paranoid about possible things.

DJC-77
08-27-14, 09:54 PM
I Have no idea guys.... not diagnosed with anything so far... just told u guys my sysptoms and I never been anxious as I am for past 2 years im now 23..... don't know where to start.

diet is clean, I workout and I feel life is so bad all I do is think all day about life and little things and then I get worried and paranoid about possible things.

Have you talked to a pdoc yet ???...

Check this out


When Adult ADHD Goes Untreated

Could my problem really be Adult ADHD?

Published on March 31, 2013 by Scott Shapiro, M.D. in The Best Strategies For Managing Adult ADHD



Case:

“Doctor, I have been to four psychiatrists during the past 10 years and have tried everything. They tell me I’m depressed or bipolar. The meds always just make me feel worse. I was in therapy for six years and figured it was that I had a bad childhood, but I still feel lousy. Can you help me?”

John met with me for the first time at The Hallowell Center. His financial firm had sent me similar people in the past—you know, those bright and brilliant people who seem like they should be excelling, but never seem to get their act together. A third of the patients they referred ended up having Adult ADHD and had never been diagnosed. Two of them got better on medications. Another couldn’t tolerate medications but found some relief from specialized goal-focused CBT for ADHD, as well as executive coaching.

In the opinion of Dr. Hallowell, ADHD is a misnomer – a bad term. He sees ADHD as neither a disorder nor a deficit of attention. In his personal and professional experience, he has come to define ADHD as a trait, not a disability.

John is a 46 year-old single man in a relationship with a woman and has been previously married twice. He has three children. He says he doesn’t know what to do and his girlfriend of 7 months is going to leave him if he doesn’t get some help.

ADHD is over-diagnosed, right?

Well, yes, in some places almost everyone is diagnosed with ADHD. However, more often than not, ADHD is missed and the person is labeled with depression or bipolar disorder.

When someone tells me they are depressed but every type of treatment in the book, including medications and several trials of different therapies haven’t worked, I start wondering if something else is going on. Many times, symptoms of ADHD can masquerade as other diagnoses. People with ADHD often have “mood swings” and difficulty with mood regulation. This isn’t in the DSM IV criteria, but if you have worked with hundreds of patients with ADHD, you know that ADHD causes mood swings. When someone with ADHD is sad or in a funk, they have a hard time shaking it. And when they are excited, they are really excited. This is one of the gifts and wonderful traits about people with ADHD. They are passionate people, passionate about life and passionate about letting other people know about it. If one doesn't spend the time getting to know the person, might think the person has bipolar disorder. Yes, bipolar disorder and ADHD do have a higher rate of occurring together; however, more often that not, people with ADHD who say they have mood swings really mean “ADHD swings” not manic swings.


Many clinicians were taught that if someone presents with depression and ADHD, first treat the depression and THEN treat the ADHD. In my opinion this is just backward thinking. Very often, the patient feels depressed, frustrated, and has lost interest in work and other activities, but this can be because he has experienced one failure after another or has gone from one job to the next. In our experience at the Hallowell Center, when you treat the ADHD, the person begins to acquire the ability to achieve their goals, improve relationships, meet deadlines, remember to pick up the children, avoid accidents on the road, remember their tickets before driving to the airport and feel a lot more competent, confident and happy.

Unfortunately, when patients are treated for depression with antidepressants, or worse, treated with atypical antipsychotics for bipolar disorder and kept on these medications for months or years, their symptoms often do not improve and might worsen. I have never seen this data in the literature, but during my training at Massachusetts General Hospital, I was taught a VERY IMPORTANT PEARL. Never, never, never take away someone’s dopamine. Dopamine gives us zest for life, motivation, and enables us to pay attention. It is the piece of the puzzle people with ADHD may be missing that inhibits and blocks them from reaching their potential. Guess what antidepressants and antipsychotics do? Through a feedback loop, these medications can decrease the function of dopamine in the frontal lobes and limbic system..

If any of this applies to you please continue reading I don't want to paste the entire article..Here is the link.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-best-strategies-managing-adult-adhd/201303/when-adult-adhd-goes-untreated

Greyhound1
08-28-14, 04:55 PM
In the opinion of Dr. Hallowell, ADHD is a misnomer – a bad term. He sees ADHD as neither a disorder nor a deficit of attention. In his personal and professional experience, he has come to define ADHD as a trait, not a disability.


I am curious about Dr. Hallowell's opinion on ADHD. Why does he consider it a trait rather than a disorder? Doesn't having enough traits or symptoms of ADHD determine a diagnosis? How can he call ADHD a trait when it is a cluster of symptoms or traits? Trait implies that ADHD does not impair ones life which it does.

DSM-5 Criteria for ADHD

People with ADHD show a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development:
Inattention: Six or more symptoms of inattention for children up to age 16, or five or more for adolescents 17 and older and adults; symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months, and they are inappropriate for developmental level:
*Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or with other activities.
*Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.
*Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
*Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, *chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked).
*Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.
*Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
*Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g. school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
*Is often easily distracted
*Is often forgetful in daily activities.

livinlife
08-28-14, 05:51 PM
haven't been to the doc yet... never really believed in all this to be honest... but what can the doc do? what will they end up doing if I really have these situations

Greyhound1
08-28-14, 07:51 PM
haven't been to the doc yet... never really believed in all this to be honest... but what can the doc do? what will they end up doing if I really have these situations

It's time to believe and know that it's not that uncommon. Your symptoms sound like anxiety and most likely depression. Many Drs. first course of action if diagnosed or not, would be to prescribe an anti depressant.

That was always the normal course of action with me. I never even claimed to be depressed or even felt depressed. My biggest issue was with anxiety all the way up to panic attacks. Most Drs. believe anxiety is caused by depression.
I know that not to be always true after being diagnosed and treated for ADHD and getting a lot better.


Let us know how it goes with the Dr. Appt.
Best of luck in finding an effective treatment.

livinlife
08-29-14, 07:19 PM
so this situation is cureable basically? and SHORTNESS OF BREATH.... air hunger is most likely from this also? its like all day and it goes away when I eat to capacity

Greyhound1
08-29-14, 11:39 PM
so this situation is cureable basically? and SHORTNESS OF BREATH.... air hunger is most likely from this also? its like all day and it goes away when I eat to capacity

I would say its definitely treatable. I wouldn't use the word cure able, but is very possible to overcome it. It will probably require a fair amount of effort on your part to help keep it under control. Anxiety can cause so many symptoms. The good news is that it can get much better. Once you get there, you just need to learn how to maintain a low anxiety level. Things like Mindfulness, meditation and Yoga all work well.

It's all about being aware of your anxiety levels and attempting to lower them or keep from escalating.

livinlife
08-30-14, 09:03 AM
yep I been dealing with SHORTNESS OF BREATH which leads to me eating for it to go away... very strange.. and this comes every 1 hour 2 hours even when not hungry

Greyhound1
08-30-14, 11:46 AM
yep I been dealing with SHORTNESS OF BREATH which leads to me eating for it to go away... very strange.. and this comes every 1 hour 2 hours even when not hungry

When you say shortness of breath, does it only happen when you have anxiety?

Also, much of our anxiety can manifest in our stomach. Many times a full stomach or even proper breathing exercises can ease a nervous stomach and anxiety.

3 Effective Anxiety Breathing Exercises
Breathing issues affect many people living with anxiety. In some cases, anxiety can be brought on by poor breathing habits, but more commonly anxiety creates poor breathing habits by constantly stimulating the autonomic nervous system, ultimately changing the way you breathe. When you have anxiety, you may find you suffer from any or all of the following:
*Shallow Breathing – Breathing in too quickly.
*Monitored Breathing – Thinking about your breathing too much.
*Over-breathing – Breathing in more air because you feel you're not getting enough.
*Poor breathing habits can lead to a variety of issues, the most common of which is hyperventilation. Hyperventilation is responsible for many of the symptoms of anxiety attacks, including chest pain and rapid heartbeat.

In addition, healthy breathing can be calming to the mind and body. So many people use breathing exercises to both stop hyperventilation and calm themselves when they're feeling high amounts of anxiety, and with the right breathing techniques, you can actually reduce the extent of your anxiety and anxiety symptoms.

Breathing exercises take practice, so don't expect them to work right away. But the more you practice, the better you'll get, and the easier a time you'll have calming yourself down during an anxiety attack or panic attack.

Stop Breathing Poorly Because of Anxiety Forever
You don't want to keep managing your breathing and your anxiety. You want to cure it forever, so that you never have to worry about it ever again. It is possible, with a personalized treatment plan based on the way you experience anxiety.

Exercises to Improve Breathing and Calm the Body
Co2 Rebreathing
What is it Good For: When you hyperventilate, it often feels as though you aren't getting enough oxygen. But the reality is that you are actually getting too much oxygen, and your carbon dioxide levels are too low. Try the following:
How it Works: Cup your hands over your mouth and breathe slowly. You can also try using a small paper bag. The idea is to prevent the expulsion of carbon dioxide and get it back into your lungs so that you regain the balance of Co2 in your system. Hold it over your face when you breathe, and keep breathing as you would normally to regain your carbon dioxide levels.
Additional Thoughts: Research is mixed on the effectiveness of rebreathing in regaining your Co2 levels. It's hard to stop an anxiety attack, and rebreathing doesn't appear to stop one completely. But it may help reduce the severity of the symptoms, which should decrease the likelihood that the anxiety attack drains you of your energy or causes any emotional swings.

Deep Breathing for Relaxation What is it Good For:
Deep breathing isn't always the best tool for an anxiety attack, but it is a good tool for high stress/high anxiety. Taking calm, deep breaths has a soothing effect on your body. It's not clear exactly why, but it's likely that controlled breathing combined with a few minutes away from your stressful situation gives you an opportunity to relax in a way that few people can do in the moment.
How it Works: There are different types of deep breathing strategies, but the simplest involves sitting in a chair with your back straight and your arms on the armrests. You take a deep, slow breath in through your nose lasting close to 5 or 6 seconds. You then hold for a few seconds, and breathe out slowly through your mouth, taking close to 7 seconds (breathe out like you're whistling). Repeat 10 times.
Additional Thoughts: Deep breathing can be difficult at first and not very relaxing. It takes some practice. But once you've gotten used to it, it becomes much easier. You'll find that the deep breaths calm you the most by your 10th breath and should lower your blood pressure as well. As you improve, you can lengthen the number of breaths to 20.
Advanced Inhale-Hold-Exhale Deep Breathing.
What is it Good For: Advanced deep breathing combines both of the benefits of the above two breathing exercises, making it great for those suffering from severe anxiety and panic attacks. However, it can be hard to master in a time of panic, so many people struggle to perform this type of exercise at first. If you're confident you can get the strength to use this exercise, you may find yourself able to calm down much faster.
How it Works: You'll need to find a much more comfortable place for this to work, and expect it to take a considerable amount of time. Find a quiet place you can stay for at least 15 to 20 minutes. Sit like you would for deep breathing with your back straight, but try to be comfortable.
For this exercise, you will be monitoring your heartbeat to keep a good rhythm. You will do at least 10 breath cycles, and each cycle will be comprised of three stages:
1. Inhale, count 5 heartbeats
2. Hold breath, count 7 heartbeats
3. Exhale, count 9 heartbeats
When you breathe in, make sure that you're breathing in through your stomach first and your chest second. Don't perform this exercise if you have a heart condition.
The slow, managed breaths are very calming. Holding your breath also helps regain your Co2 levels, to reduce some of the effects of hyperventilation.
Additional Thoughts: It can be very hard to perform this type of exercise, especially if it's your first time with breathing exercises. During an anxiety attack, it's hard to gather your thoughts enough to count heartbeats and calm your body. But if you can master this technique, you'll find that you should be able to calm yourself during a panic attack, and possibly experience some relief from your panic symptoms.
Choosing the Right Breathing Exercises
There are other breathing strategies you can try as well. For example, some people prefer to add a mental distraction to their breathing exercises to take their mind off their panic. You may try to:

*Imagine yourself tracing a square in your mind and inhaling/exhaling every time you turn a corner.
*Imagine blowing on a candle, except rather than try to blow it out, you try to blow it just softly enough that it dances around.
*These are the types of additional strategies that may also help you relieve some of your panic and anxiety symptoms. Your next course of action is an anxiety treatment. By curing your anxiety, you'll also stop your poor breathing habits.

livinlife
08-30-14, 08:53 PM
idk what u mean ... Idk if its anxiety but im always thinking so much and worrying and bored.... then all day shortness of breath... airhunger... it tends to go away when fulling up stomach

Greyhound1
08-31-14, 01:37 PM
idk what u mean ... Idk if its anxiety but im always thinking so much and worrying and bored.... then all day shortness of breath... airhunger... it tends to go away when fulling up stomach

My point was that your shortness of breath could easily be a symptom of anxiety since you mentioned you suffer with it. I had also quoted some breathing exercises and techniques to help with it.
Dyspnea (/dɪspˈniːə/ disp-nee-ə; also dyspnoea; Latin: dyspnoea; Greek: δύσπνοια, dýspnoia), shortness of breath (SOB), or air hunger,[1] is the subjective symptom of breathlessness.[2][3]

The clinical definition of dyspnea is an uncomfortable awareness of one's breathing effort. It is a normal symptom of heavy exertion but becomes pathological if it occurs in unexpected situations.[2] In 85% of cases it is due to either asthma, pneumonia, cardiac ischemia, interstitial lung disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or psychogenic causes,[4] such as panic disorder and anxiety.[5] Treatment typically depends on the underlying cause.[6]

livinlife
09-01-14, 09:50 PM
but why do u think I relized it after the surgrey? it wasn't before...

Greyhound1
09-02-14, 12:28 AM
but why do u think I relized it after the surgrey? it wasn't before...
I don't think you ever mentioned surgery. I know people can experience anxiety and depression as a result. Perhaps the surgery caused the anxiety which is causing the air hunger/shortness of breath. That maybe why you didn't realize it until after the surgery.

Here is some info on anxiety and depression after surgery. It's fairly common.

http://www.ehow.com/how_5752540_family-post-surgical-depression-anxiety.html

livinlife
09-02-14, 05:48 PM
woooow that's crazy.... whats best soultion

Lunacie
09-02-14, 07:37 PM
I am curious about Dr. Hallowell's opinion on ADHD. Why does he consider it a trait rather than a disorder? Doesn't having enough traits or symptoms of ADHD determine a diagnosis? How can he call ADHD a trait when it is a cluster of symptoms or traits? Trait implies that ADHD does not impair ones life which it does.

On this page, Dr. Hallowell explains (rather inadequately in my opinion) why he calls ADHD a trait rather than a disorder.
http://www.drhallowell.com/blog/dr-hallowell-i-know-how-terribly-crippling-adhd-can-be/

Greyhound1
09-03-14, 01:08 AM
woooow that's crazy.... whats best soultion

See the Dr.

livinlife
09-03-14, 05:37 PM
I am tomorrow... should I tell them anything special or just the symptom's

livinlife
09-05-14, 09:58 PM
doc gave me proazac.....its day 1 and I feel high kinda where im emotionless and dumb... is this normal in beginning 20mg

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 01:56 AM
It is normal to feel a little strange at first as your body adjusts. It takes some time to start to work effectively. It should help a little more each day. You may not notice much at first.

daveddd
09-06-14, 02:17 AM
so this situation is cureable basically? and SHORTNESS OF BREATH.... air hunger is most likely from this also? its like all day and it goes away when I eat to capacity

i would make sure this isn't a physical problem as well

daveddd
09-06-14, 02:21 AM
I am curious about Dr. Hallowell's opinion on ADHD. Why does he consider it a trait rather than a disorder? Doesn't having enough traits or symptoms of ADHD determine a diagnosis? How can he call ADHD a trait when it is a cluster of symptoms or traits? Trait implies that ADHD does not impair ones life which it does.

i don't think the word trait means its not impairing

most mental health issues are extremes of human traits, not abnormalities

if its not a trait, its a state, or a temporary condition


depression and anxiety are states

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 12:18 PM
i don't think the word trait means its not impairing

most mental health issues are extremes of human traits, not abnormalities

if its not a trait, its a state, or a temporary condition


depression and anxiety are states

Traits normally just refer to characteristics. Sure, they can cause some impairment but they are no where as impairing as a disorder. In order to be diagnosed with a disorder, according to the DSM, you have to have so and so many traits. Many people, have some ADHD traits, but do not have the disorder, because they only have one or some of the traits.

I hope that's somewhat clear - some traits does not a disorder make, but enough sure do. My point was just that ADHD is a lot more than just a trait. It is a cluster of traits used to determine the diagnosis. Saying ADHD is a trait is no different then saying any other disorder is just a trait.

Trait implies one characteristic, whereas disorder is defined by multiple.

daveddd
09-06-14, 12:20 PM
In order to be diagnosed with a disorder, according to the DSM, you have to have so and so many traits. Many people, have some ADHD traits, but do not have the disorder, because they only have one or some of the traits.

I hope that's somewhat clear - some traits does not a disorder make, but enough sure do. My point was just that ADHD is a lot more than just a trait. It is a cluster of traits used to determine the diagnosis. Saying ADHD is a trait is no different then saying any other disorder is just a trait.

Trait implies one characteristic, whereas disorder is defined by multiple.

if you go by barkley (i don't) it is just one trait, poor self regulation

daveddd
09-06-14, 12:31 PM
barkley calls adhd a trait as well, not just hallow ell

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 12:38 PM
I disagree with their description and terminology of ADHD being a trait. It is too broad.
That is like saying any disease is just a trait of bad health.

daveddd
09-06-14, 12:42 PM
I disagree with their description and terminology of ADHD. It is too broad.
That is like saying any disease is just a trait of bad health.

I'm not a fan of either of their models

but to their defense , we have medicalized quite a bit that should be classified as coping mechanisms

coping mechanisms will vary greatly throughout the adhd population, amount of use, groupings,

self regulation is the deficit , the rest is coping mechanisms

adhd isn't a disease, poor self regulation can stem from several different causes, not a singular entity

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 12:53 PM
I understand how they can say ADHD is a trait of poor self regulation but how does that make it not a disorder?

daveddd
09-06-14, 01:04 PM
if the trait of self regulation is bad enough to cause impairment in functioning its a disorder

Lunacie
09-06-14, 01:12 PM
I understand how they can say ADHD is a trait of poor self regulation but how does that make it not a disorder?

Who says it is not a disorder?

daveddd
09-06-14, 01:17 PM
a disease is something you have or you don't

trait is.. take IQ

IQ is a trait everyone has, if it falls below 70 its considered a disability

EQ (emotional intelligence ) is most likely directly correlated with self regulation

if your self regulation level (trait,emotional intelligence) is below the threshold or causes impairment its a disability

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 01:19 PM
Who says it is not a disorder?

Dr. Halloway
In the opinion of Dr. Hallowell, ADHD is a misnomer – a bad term. He sees ADHD as neither a disorder nor a deficit of attention. In his personal and professional experience, he has come to define ADHD as a trait, not a disability.

Lunacie
09-06-14, 02:01 PM
Dr. Halloway

That is someone quoting someone who misunderstood Dr. Hallowell.

I posted a link earlier where Dr. Hallowell explained the misunderstanding.

in part ...
Recently I received an “open letter to Ned Hallowell” in which the author took me to task for stating that ADHD is not a disorder but rather a trait. She then went on to explain how much pain and suffering ADHD has caused her, and she criticized me for implying that she did not have a disorder (which I most certainly did not mean to do). She said that while ADHD may not have disabled me, it was certainly disabling her.

Her letter reflects a widespread misunderstanding of my position. Let me take a moment to clarify where I stand.

Whenever I say that ADHD is a trait, I immediately go on to state that it can indeed be a disorder, and that it can ruin a life. The prisons, the ranks of the addicted, the halls of the unemployed, the people who have been multiply divorced, the people who suffer from depression, and even the people who commit suicide are over-represented by people who have ADHD. It would be absurd to claim that ADHD cannot be a crippling, chronic, lifelong disability. I fully acknowledge how desperately painful life with ADHD can be. Short of the severe outcomes mentioned above, ADHD often leads to a lifetime of underachievement, frustration, unmet potential, and ongoing sadness, if not despair.

I know how terribly crippling ADHD can be. I’ve been treating it for over 30 years in people of all ages, so I have seen firsthand how devastating ADHD can be.

My point in calling it a trait, rather than a disability, is that ADHD, if managed well, can also be associated with success at the very highest levels.

Greyhound1
09-06-14, 02:55 PM
That is someone quoting someone who misunderstood Dr. Hallowell.

I posted a link earlier where Dr. Hallowell explained the misunderstanding.

in part ...

Excellent. That clears up a lot for me. I was about ready to invite him to our forum for a debate or at least a Q & A! Gettin fired up. That is where I took issue. Thank you for the explanation. Post #8 confused me. Thought perhaps was claiming he works or knows Dr. Hallowell where the quote came from.

Lunacie
09-06-14, 02:58 PM
Excellent. That clears up a lot for me. I was about ready to invite him to our forum for a debate or at least a Q & A! Gettin fired up. That is where I took issue. Thank you for the explanation. Post #8 confused me. Thought perhaps was claiming he works or knows Dr. Hallowell where the quote came from.

I don't always agree with Dr. Hallowell - he sees ADHD as a gift as much as an impairment.

But people who misquote other people without checking their facts disgust me.
(I use snopes.com fairly often, also Wikipedia)

Also, it seems you mangled the terms "disorder" and "disability" together.
Easily done as that author didn't make a clear distinction between them here:

In the opinion of Dr. Hallowell, ADHD is a misnomer – a bad term. He sees ADHD as neither a disorder nor a deficit of attention. In his personal and professional experience, he has come to define ADHD as a trait, not a disability.

Flory
09-06-14, 07:06 PM
Yes I had OCD in my childhood and teen years alongside my ADHD :)

livinlife
09-09-14, 09:05 PM
what do u mean check if its not physical? they already ran most test....

what would descrivbe the anxiety mood swings thorugh out day and random depression swings?

megco802
11-12-14, 01:27 PM
So in short, it seems that:

ADHD going without diagnosis/treatment for an extended period of time may lead to an arise of other disorders, such as OCPD, the battle between the OCPD and the ADHD leads to severe anxiety, which in turn may lead to severe depression (vise versa)

In the end, we end up with a novel of issues and a scavenger hunt to find its true source.

In addition to this idea, i also have a question.
Can PTSD also be something as simply as severe anxiety over random memories for no apparent reason? Being over stressed over certain things in your past and you cant seem to figure out why?
Or does it HAVE to be caused by a major significant event?

OhLookABunny
12-28-14, 06:32 PM
I like Dr. Hallowell; he was one of the pioneers so to speak of awareness of adult ADD/HD. A more recent acquaintance I've made is Dr. Daniel Amen, through his books in the last few years especially Healing ADD. They both seem like very wise and compassionate doctors to me. :)

meisam317
02-16-15, 06:41 AM
Yes it is possible. I have been diagnosed and living with all three for 45 years.

80% of people diagnosed with AD(H)D have a second disorder. 55% have a third!
I was diagnosed AD(H)D, with anxiety and depression in 1969.
My recipe for battling these disorders are;

The right medication
Discipline and structure
Healthy diet
Quality consistent sleep
Daily exercise (evven as simple as walking)
Support system (forum, family, fellow AD(H)Der)

But the most important ingredient to living happy and healthy with any or all of these disorders is a good sense of humor! I don't take myself or life too serious.

Hey, I have a few disorders that make life difficult, but it's the hand I was dealt and I decided many years ago to make the best of it.

My only regret in life was spending too many years suffereing in silence! This forum has been the best medicine I have ever had for dealing with my disorders, I hope it helps you in the same way!

"We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or we can rejoice because thorn bushes have roses!"

I wish good thingsfor you!

I Have AD/HD - OCD - Asperger :D

bldt
03-03-15, 07:06 PM
Excellent stuff Tmoney :) :goodpost:

Being older (55) and never diagnosed as ADD it lead to severe anxiety and depression.The only thing I can add to Tmoney's list is find a psychologist or therapist as soon as you can.The proper medication will make a world of difference and give you the will and desire to get better..GL

I could have wrote this.I actually had to check if I did.:giggle::giggle:
:goodpost:

ADXP
07-25-15, 02:40 PM
Whenever I say that ADHD is a trait, I immediately go on to state that it can indeed be a disorder, and that it can ruin a life. The prisons, the ranks of the addicted, the halls of the unemployed, the people who have been multiply divorced, the people who suffer from depression, and even the people who commit suicide are over-represented by people who have ADHD. It would be absurd to claim that ADHD cannot be a crippling, chronic, lifelong disability. I fully acknowledge how desperately painful life with ADHD can be. Short of the severe outcomes mentioned above, ADHD often leads to a lifetime of underachievement, frustration, unmet potential, and ongoing sadness, if not despair.""""

Here is my response...xx

This is like saying that a banana can also be an orange. It is implied that both are fruits. No they cannot be both. Trait is a result from a natural phenomenon & would not cause that much havoc in almost every moment of our waking hours. A trait would not require medications in order to control its occurrence. ADD is a result of a malfunction in our brain that cannot be controlled & is out of range of control by a normal person without proper medication.

ADD is not disabling to me it destroyed me for a very long time. Calling it a trait just heightens the stigma that is destroying us as well. One of the million assumption is we all want to be high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trait

This utterly a disgrace to call it a trait. I have so much to say but let me leave it that way becoz i am getting angry.

Lunacie
07-25-15, 04:15 PM
Technically one can call ADHD a trait.

trait in Science

A genetically determined characteristic or condition. Traits may be physical, such as hair color or leaf shape, or they may be behavioral, such as nesting in birds and burrowing in rodents. Traits typically result from the combined action of several genes, though some traits are expressed by a single gene.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/trait

Dr. Russell Barkley says that ADHD is mostly genetically based.

The heritability of ADHD averages approximately 80 percent, meaning that genetic factors account for 80 percent of the differences among individuals in this set of behavioral traits. For comparison, consider that this figure rivals that for the role of genetics in human height.
http://www.russellbarkley.org/factsheets/adhd-facts.pdf

(bolding added by me)

But some of here also find Dr. Hallowell's perspective of ADHD to somewhat
dismissive of the seriousness of this disorder. He tries to be encouraging to
patients and their families, while Dr. Barkley lets us know just how serious
and imairing the disorder really is.

Greyhound1
07-25-15, 04:50 PM
Great post Luna

ADHD is a trait we do have. This trait is also an impairment and disorder by definition we have as well.

Lunacie
07-25-15, 05:16 PM
Great post Luna

ADHD is a trait we do have. This trait is also an impairment and disorder by definition we have as well.

Thank you, I didn't realize how "trait" was used scientifically, but it makes sense.

daveddd
07-25-15, 05:57 PM
Technically one can call ADHD a trait.


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/trait

Dr. Russell Barkley says that ADHD is mostly genetically based.


http://www.russellbarkley.org/factsheets/adhd-facts.pdf

(bolding added by me)

But some of here also find Dr. Hallowell's perspective of ADHD to somewhat
dismissive of the seriousness of this disorder. He tries to be encouraging to
patients and their families, while Dr. Barkley lets us know just how serious
and imairing the disorder really is.

like most traits , a strong genetic component

i think dizfriz used to quote barkley

"adhd isn't something you have or don't , its the extreme end of normal human traits"

science has shown that like all mental illness, its not just one specific brain abnormality

its hard to say that without people assuming you're invalidating the dx, thats not the case at all