View Full Version : Can anyone relate? College?


Darkpk55
09-18-14, 12:49 AM
I'm 20 years old and I'm taking college classes. All my life I've been terrible at history, psychology, politics, anthropology, & math. In high school I would try so hard & I failed in almost every class. I guess I'm a late bloomer. At this age, I have barely achieved the same level of intelligence as a sophomore in high school. I just couldn't retain or understand anything I read. Although my concentration is a bit better now, it's not helping with my psychology class. I studied hard for this class & I did worse than the majority of the class. I do poorly at explaining things. I end up as an introvert that never speaks because my mind just can't function or find the words to explain something.

If I was forced to major in these classes. I really would not make it through. I see others how they pick up fast. Words don't even get processed in my brain it's crazy. Ask me what the movie was about... don't know except that it was good. I have memorized what a republican is and a democrat so many times, and till this day... I can't explain to u what that is. I already forgot... and if I did know.. I wouldn't make sense when explaining.

Words don't stick to me and neither do lyrics. Most people hear lyrics and sing them. I have only memorized 2 songs in my entire life and that was with pure repetition. Can anyone relate to this? My major is nursing but now I just don't know what to do.

Jenn1202
09-18-14, 01:28 AM
I can relate. I can hardly read and comprehend written information without my ADD meds. Text to speech, audio textbooks, and films really helped me get through classes that required lots of reading. Listening to an audio textbook while doing something else (e.g. doodling, playing video games, running, etc.) helped me retain the information a lot better. Also, discussing the material with other people, such as family, friends or a tutor can also help a lot. I went from nearly failing to excelling in several classes by using these strategies.

If your attention problems make it difficult for you to complete exams, you can probably get testing accommodations, such as oral administration (having the questions read to you) or getting a scribe to write down your answers (which could potentially help you express yourself better).

Hope this helps.

sarahsweets
09-18-14, 03:14 AM
Have you ever considered the possibility that college is not your path?

Darkpk55
09-18-14, 03:49 PM
I can relate. I can hardly read and comprehend written information without my ADD meds. Text to speech, audio textbooks, and films really helped me get through classes that required lots of reading. Listening to an audio textbook while doing something else (e.g. doodling, playing video games, running, etc.) helped me retain the information a lot better. Also, discussing the material with other people, such as family, friends or a tutor can also help a lot. I went from nearly failing to excelling in several classes by using these strategies.

If your attention problems make it difficult for you to complete exams, you can probably get testing accommodations, such as oral administration (having the questions read to you) or getting a scribe to write down your answers (which could potentially help you express yourself better).

Hope this helps.

I definetly will get accomodations now that I'm struggling. It's great to hear I'm not alone.

TygerSan
09-18-14, 04:26 PM
A lot of the courses that you mention you're not good at are ones that require a lot of reading, and that throw a lot of information at you at a time. Introductory Psychology and Anthropology are the two that are the worst for that.

Sometimes colleges will allow reduced courseload as an accommodation. So, you'd only have to take 3 classes instead of 4, and you'd have more time to focus on the stuff that you find most difficult. It might be hard to graduate on time, but you might be able to use the extra time.